Cruise Ship Upper Tonnage Limit

ggrammer
6th February 2007, 04:19
To All,

I have come to reflect that I would like to see the upper limit to the mega-tonnage spree we have seen with recent cruise ship newbuilds. QM2 only just allows for symmetry in its design and anything more might border on the grotesque. Certainly, the Freedom class ships from RCCL are suffering from a stale look (just add a couple of more frames to the Voyager class) that are hinting to a lack of originality and beauty the characterized the designs of the old liners. Your thoughts please.

George Grammer

cruiseboy
25th April 2007, 23:44
They do look like the Voyager class ships. I thought RCCL would have used a new design.
Cruise ships are getting far too big and I think there should be a tonnage limit of aroungd 160,00grt.

Paul UK
26th April 2007, 00:26
They do look like the Voyager class ships. I thought RCCL would have used a new design.
Cruise ships are getting far too big and I think there should be a tonnage limit of aroungd 160,00grt.


just wait for their 220,000 tonners on order now !!!!

Paul

cynffig
26th April 2007, 05:19
For a look at the latest monster size cruise ship - 250,000 GT- this is a link to Japan's Princess Kaguya:
http://www.princesskaguya.com/e_pkaguya2.htm

cboots
26th April 2007, 10:04
I think that one has to take onboard the design criteria for the cruise ship and that is to squeeze the last cent out of the punters in terms of what they spend onboard. I did have corporate planning responsibility for a couple of cruise ships during my shoreside career in the industry and the major factor for them was the per diem rate. That is what the average passenger spends per day over and above their fare. The whole operation revolved around maximising the per diem rate. So if the ships look like a mix of shopping mall, disco, restaurants, night clubs, sports centre, etc, so long as it stays afloat, and the passengers keep on spending, the operators will happy.
CBoots

VLCC
9th December 2007, 22:19
Its only been in the last 20 years that the tonnage war has set in, yes carrying more passengers may be more profitable but not everyone wants a cruise so what do you do with all the empty cabins?

how do you get your ship from A to B without grounding her? what happens if you need to abandon ship? do passengers really appreciate a ferry ride everytime they have to go ashore because your ship cant dock in the harbour?

will the ships out grow the suez limits probably then what do you do?

fred henderson
9th December 2007, 22:53
Only Royal Caribbean (the number two cruise group) has placed orders for cruise ships in excess of 200,000 tons. Carnival Corporation, which is twice the size of RCCL and far stronger financially, has a long running project for similar ships but remains to be convinced of the value of these giants. Carnival has ordered many more smaller ships with a greater combined passenger capacity than the RCCL orders.

It will be interesting to see which business model is most successful. It will be a dramatic reversal of fortune however, if any of these ships are sailing with empty cabins.

Fred(Thumb)