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  #1  
Old 18th March 2012, 00:07
LochinvarLad LochinvarLad is offline  
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FAO All Nav Officers

What were your top 5 toughest entries and exits.
Mine were:-
1) Vernon Inner in anything other than a slack tide
2) Jarrow Coal Jetty. Long haul with some Gordie pilot yapping in some unintelligable tongue
3) Gib. Getting that wheel change right when before getting into dead water without hitting the breakwater was a trick.
4) Fleetwood. Lining up to that off centred lock. Murder if there was the slightest zephyr
5) Getting under the Forth Bridge at exactly the same time as a train was passing over. Thats why every Navo in the 1st & 4th MCM had a BR timetable amongst their books.

Most fun:-
The Inner passage of the Hebridies. A lot of prep neede and its a long watch to go through. Did it twice South and once North.The Gulf of Corryvreckan whirlpool is a laugh, did it once. Looks impressive though, but to drive though its OK if you watch the water. Inner passage was hard work but a lot better if the Minches were crinkly.
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  #2  
Old 18th March 2012, 00:13
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NoR NoR is online now  
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Sailed my 27ft UFO through Corryvreckan in 1983. No probs and few free beers at Crinan on the strength of it.
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  #3  
Old 18th March 2012, 04:27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LochinvarLad View Post
Most fun:-
The Inner passage of the Hebridies. A lot of prep neede and its a long watch to go through. Did it twice South and once North.The Gulf of Corryvreckan whirlpool is a laugh, did it once. Looks impressive though, but to drive though its OK if you watch the water. Inner passage was hard work but a lot better if the Minches were crinkly.
Was that the Sound of Mull, Sound of Islay and the Skye passage (Kyle of Lochalsh)???
Interesting and great scenery but not "fun"
Did it many times to avoid the bad weather.
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  #4  
Old 18th March 2012, 08:27
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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"with some Gordie pilot yapping in some unintelligable tongue"

Probably a seaman.
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  #5  
Old 18th March 2012, 09:05
borderreiver borderreiver is online now  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LochinvarLad View Post
What were your top 5 toughest entries and exits.
Mine were:-
1) Vernon Inner in anything other than a slack tide
2) Jarrow Coal Jetty. Long haul with some Gordie pilot yapping in some unintelligable tongue
3) Gib. Getting that wheel change right when before getting into dead water without hitting the breakwater was a trick.
4) Fleetwood. Lining up to that off centred lock. Murder if there was the slightest zephyr
5) Getting under the Forth Bridge at exactly the same time as a train was passing over. Thats why every Navo in the 1st & 4th MCM had a BR timetable amongst their books.

Most fun:-
The Inner passage of the Hebridies. A lot of prep neede and its a long watch to go through. Did it twice South and once North.The Gulf of Corryvreckan whirlpool is a laugh, did it once. Looks impressive though, but to drive though its OK if you watch the water. Inner passage was hard work but a lot better if the Minches were crinkly.
On the Border Reiver we went under the Forth bridge while a train was above. Border Reiver had a very large steam whistle which was blown. The train could not be seen for steam
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  #6  
Old 18th March 2012, 09:36
Robert Hilton Robert Hilton is offline  
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Downstream from Norwich, waiting for Reedham bridge to open, whilst the run into the bight takes your light ship steadily towards the hire cruisers alongside the pub. The grockles would leap onto the bank like cats.

I have been under the Skye bridge a number of times before it was built and hope to do so a few more times. The Sound of Luing as an alternative to Corrievreckan if you have the nerve.
__________________
Getting worse and enjoying every minute.

Last edited by Robert Hilton : 18th March 2012 at 09:36. Reason: Misprunt
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  #7  
Old 18th March 2012, 10:15
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Michal-S Michal-S is offline  
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Goole. As one pilot described it-the port built in XVIII century for horse-hauled barges...and nothing changed since.
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  #8  
Old 18th March 2012, 15:33
LochinvarLad LochinvarLad is offline  
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Robert. I used to live in the first downstream cottage in Reedham. Used to love the panic that ensued amongst the grockles whenever a steamer came up river. Generally used the Sound of Luing as Corryvreckan was trickier.
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  #9  
Old 18th March 2012, 18:51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michal-S View Post
Goole. As one pilot described it-the port built in XVIII century for horse-hauled barges...and nothing changed since.
Michal.

Did he mention Grismby where the locks are aligned at an angle to enable sailing ships to be warped into Royal Dock? Both Goole and Grismby still operating too. Says something for the original workmanship.
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  #10  
Old 19th March 2012, 07:49
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All,
The Pentland Firth?!!
Yours aye,
slick
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  #11  
Old 19th March 2012, 08:41
Spurling Pipe Spurling Pipe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparkie2182 View Post
"with some Gordie pilot yapping in some unintelligable tongue"

Probably a seaman.

Is that really necessary?
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  #12  
Old 19th March 2012, 10:22
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Michal-S Michal-S is offline  
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Goole

Quote:
Originally Posted by pilot View Post
Michal.

Did he mention Grismby where the locks are aligned at an angle to enable sailing ships to be warped into Royal Dock? Both Goole and Grismby still operating too. Says something for the original workmanship.
I have never been to Grimsby. Goole used to give me enough thrill to enter the basin to the port-side of the lock after lifting-bridge with 85-metres long vessel. Once after some tough entry we were joking with pilot that local hospital's cardiatic ward is always on duty during high water (limiting conditions to enter or leave the port).
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  #13  
Old 19th March 2012, 13:25
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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"Is that really necessary?"

In the context that "with some Gordie pilot yapping in some unintelligable tongue" is necessary..........

Yes.
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  #14  
Old 19th March 2012, 13:41
Spurling Pipe Spurling Pipe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparkie2182 View Post
"Is that really necessary?"

In the context that "with some Gordie pilot yapping in some unintelligable tongue" is necessary..........

Yes.
And the "Probably a seaman" bit?
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  #15  
Old 19th March 2012, 13:51
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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As the initial post carried more than a modicum of disdain...........

So did mine.

Nothing personal.

At least .......... Not as personal as the............

"Some Gordie pilot yapping in some unintelligable tongue" remark.
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  #16  
Old 19th March 2012, 14:15
borderreiver borderreiver is online now  
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Another great is going through the Port of Le Havre going passed the swing bridges how many passager trains did we hold up then full bus plus cars
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  #17  
Old 19th March 2012, 14:19
Spurling Pipe Spurling Pipe is offline
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Thank you.
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  #18  
Old 19th March 2012, 16:37
LochinvarLad LochinvarLad is offline  
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Sparkie and Spurling.
No disrespect was meant toward the Geordie Pilot. I am sure he felt the same way about me.I speak very broad North East Scots. Ken fit like, min?
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  #19  
Old 19th March 2012, 19:02
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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Fair ennuf L.L.

No disrespect intended to the R.N. likewise.



Dinna fret y'sen la........

S2182

Now if we could only settle the South Atlantic situation so easily..............

Last edited by sparkie2182 : 19th March 2012 at 19:05.
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  #20  
Old 19th March 2012, 19:22
captainjohn captainjohn is offline  
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Haven't seen any comments about this side of the Atlantic. For me sailing our of New York, the Newark Bay Draw before it was taken down..axis of the bridge openingoff set about 20 degrees to the channel axis.The current always seemed to be underfoot and you were never sure when you left the dock in Port Newark or Port Elizabeth that the draw wouldn't stick half open. Happened to me one night. Also getting into the oil berth behind the Charles River Bridge in Boston.
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  #21  
Old 19th March 2012, 19:26
sparkie2182 sparkie2182 is online now  
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Would this be the "Kill Van Kull" stretch, Captainjohn?

We had a shipmaster who lost two props there on two consecutive voyages.

The office was not pleased.
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  #22  
Old 19th March 2012, 20:25
Anchorman Anchorman is offline  
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All the stone jetties had their moments, but I think Dean Quarry took some beating,on a miserable winters morning with poor vis,onshore wind, and just the fore peak in.
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  #23  
Old 19th March 2012, 20:26
McCloggie McCloggie is offline  
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Portsmouth initially seemed difficult on an RN ship - just so much going on - but with a good team and doing it regularly I found we became pretty good. Same as anything I suppose.

The ones that stand out for me are:

- The Thames going all the way to/from Tower Bridge and Sea Reach. It was a long haul and took a lot of concentration even when I was used to it and even when we had a pilot. At night, the lights from the shore and from the disco boats could be confusing and there could be a tide running when berthing/unberthing as well.

- Anywhere in the Channel Islands - lots of yachts, French fishermen trying to berth outboard and huge tidal differences and races.

- Going through to Albert Dock in Liverpool from the river seemed difficult but it was probably more shiphandling than navigation.

- Other stand out places were Torbay - very tight, Boulogne - ferry here, ferry there, ferry up your chuff all holding alongside with thrusters which threw us sideways going into the lock!

Rosyth in itself was not too hard but you passed Admiralty House going inbound from the Bridges so timing had to be (well was supposed to be) spot on!

With the extra RN manpower available and a good team working together though, pilotage became an enjoyable challenge on most occasions and something to take pride in.

McC
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  #24  
Old 19th March 2012, 20:39
LochinvarLad LochinvarLad is offline  
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Agreed McCloggie Pompey was easy but the Vernon eddy current was always a pain. The Channel islands reminds me of when I was NavO off Highburton.Us and a sister ship were tied up at the German Jetty in Alderney.We had a bet on a race back to Port Edgar. We were outboard and concocted a plan to snaek off early. So 2 hours before ETD we cast off, drifted away then fired up the Deltics which always made a big bang.Sister ship (name withheld) woke up, panic ensued ,she set off and pulled down a lot of the German Jetty facilities as they forgot to cast off.
But you are right I loved pilotage.
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  #25  
Old 19th March 2012, 21:00
McCloggie McCloggie is offline  
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Ah the bang and F1 type roar of twin deltics with the ensuing black smoke. I remember it well!

Funniest thing I saw in the CIs was an RNR S/Lt being put through his paces for his "ticket". He was doing the pilotage with me and the usual team acting as safety and checking him.

CO: "Come on Sub. Is there a head mark for me here? WHere is it? What is it? Come on - speak to me!"

Flustered S/SLt: "It should be there Sir. Look" and promptly displays the appropriate page in the CI Pilot.

CO is rendered speechless and usual team step in!

Never had to do Vernon on a ship but I do remember folk telling me about it!

McC
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