Info? general please from Graham Wallace - Ships Nostalgia
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Info? general please from Graham Wallace

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  #1  
Old 5th January 2017, 19:22
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Info? general please from Graham Wallace

Hi Graham, I believe you keep BP records,(some?) of news personnel and ships.
I sailed either as a J/e or 4/E on the ss Bombardier and the Queen 50KT-DWT, between 65-66.
The sailings were enjoyable, all though I cannot name all the Officers both engine/ deck , or the PO's and Pumpman.
My mind is playing tricks, with one particular Engineer (3/e or X3/e) Robert Falconer Thomas- we new him as Robert, if he was on form 'TORCHIE' as he would not rest until he had bottomed a problem, and his torch beam highlighted many a piece of engine room auxiliary machinery.
Robert to his considerable attributes academically was as a BP HND Apprentice, and a Fellow of the Royal Institute. Robert was an apprentice in 1955-56 or earlier.
My question is??? Is there confirmation that Robert was a Fellow of the Royal Institution, and did he join Fleet A as an engineer superintendent , with Fred Day some time in the mid 1970's.
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  #2  
Old 6th January 2017, 23:04
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david freeman View Post
Hi Graham, I believe you keep BP records,(some?) of news personnel and ships.
I sailed either as a J/e or 4/E on the ss Bombardier and the Queen 50KT-DWT, between 65-66.
The sailings were enjoyable, all though I cannot name all the Officers both engine/ deck , or the PO's and Pumpman.
My mind is playing tricks, with one particular Engineer (3/e or X3/e) Robert Falconer Thomas- we new him as Robert, if he was on form 'TORCHIE' as he would not rest until he had bottomed a problem, and his torch beam highlighted many a piece of engine room auxiliary machinery.
Robert to his considerable attributes academically was as a BP HND Apprentice, and a Fellow of the Royal Institute. Robert was an apprentice in 1955-56 or earlier.
My question is??? Is there confirmation that Robert was a Fellow of the Royal Institution, and did he join Fleet A as an engineer superintendent , with Fred Day some time in the mid 1970's.
David,

I have some answers but first his name was Robert Faulkner Thomas.

RFT was a 1958 BP Marine Engineering Apprentice and attended Hendon Technical College. According to my files he started his OND apprenticeship at Hendon which at the time had been running an HND course for two years for selected 1956 and 1957 Apprentices who transferred over to Hendon. Starting in 1958 at at Hendon might have been a coincidence.

In November 1959 at Hendon there were 12 1956 HND (A2) students and 11 1957 HND (A1) students. Out of that group of 25 only one (DL Morgan) started his OND at Hendon Tech. Unfortunately I have no information on HND students after 1959 and Bob falls in that category, general consensus was of him in the HND course.

In 1963 He was awarded the Special Final, Final award winner for1958 intake along with RG Low. Second’s Motor Cert 1965, Chief’s Steam Cert 1968. Junior Engineer Ensign April 1964, Cygnet 3E Dec 1969. I first came in touch with him March 2003, but unfortunately never heard anything of his BP career, a missed opportunity.

However I do have contacts and know a little more, he was an Engineering Supt in early 1970’s, certainly in C fleet. He was present at DJ Alcock’s (all old EA’s knew him) retirement party (year?),
Transferred to the oil Major’s Bunker Committee and remained there for many years.

It is probable that he was not a Member of the Royal Society.

He died 1st February 2015

In 1965 my only crew list for the Bombardier was leaving drydock March/April so cannot help you with your memory.

But I do have a lot of old BP info, ships, crew lists and more.

Graham

Last edited by Graham Wallace; 6th January 2017 at 23:07..
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  #3  
Old 7th January 2017, 08:40
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Thankd Graham. Old father time marches on!!!
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  #4  
Old 7th January 2017, 11:12
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Harlequin Harlequin is offline
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Hi Graham, I was hoping you might be able to supply any info. on a Malcolm Jackson who was a BP engineering apprentice in the late 60s. He was my apprentice when he came to Smiths Dock in I968-69 for experience in a ship repair environment, and he was with me for about a year. He was a great lad, and I'm sure he went on to achieve his tickets. We did keep in touch for a while after he left the yard and first went to sea, but unfortunately we did lose touch.
Hope you don't mind my enquiry.
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  #5  
Old 7th January 2017, 17:31
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Thankd Graham. Old father time marches on!!!
David, I take smaller steps these days.

Graham
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  #6  
Old 7th January 2017, 17:35
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Originally Posted by Harlequin View Post
Hi Graham, I was hoping you might be able to supply any info. on a Malcolm Jackson who was a BP engineering apprentice in the late 60s. He was my apprentice when he came to Smiths Dock in I968-69 for experience in a ship repair environment, and he was with me for about a year. He was a great lad, and I'm sure he went on to achieve his tickets. We did keep in touch for a while after he left the yard and first went to sea, but unfortunately we did lose touch.
Hope you don't mind my enquiry.
Harlequin,

I do have some info on him, let me flesh it out a little and I'll be back.
Unfortunately I have never been in touch with him.

Graham
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  #7  
Old 7th January 2017, 17:38
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Thanks Graham, hope I'm not putting you out.
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  #8  
Old 7th January 2017, 17:52
Jim S Jim S is offline   SN Supporter
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Re Robert Faulkner Thomas - He was a Fellow (the top level of membership) of what was then the Institute of Marine Engineers - This from the I Mar E Centenary Handbook of 1989.
At that time he resided in Northwood, Middlesex.
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  #9  
Old 10th January 2017, 21:28
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harlequin View Post
Hi Graham, I was hoping you might be able to supply any info. on a Malcolm Jackson who was a BP engineering apprentice in the late 60s. He was my apprentice when he came to Smiths Dock in I968-69 for experience in a ship repair environment, and he was with me for about a year. He was a great lad, and I'm sure he went on to achieve his tickets. We did keep in touch for a while after he left the yard and first went to sea, but unfortunately we did lose touch.
Hope you don't mind my enquiry.
Harlequin, No problem, he seems to be a little of an enigma.

M (Malcolm?) Jackson BP Marine Engineering Apprentice/Cadet.

The first time I noticed M Jackson’s name was in August 1969 crew list aboard the(MV) Commodore as an AJE and from then on the following;

(SS)Industry, 4E 12/1970- 3/1971
(MV)Dragoon, 4E 3/1972- 7/1972
(SS)Ambassador, x3E 12/74 She sank Jan 1975 and he possibly joined her one month earlier.
(MV)Tenacity, 3E 10/1976- 1/1977

I was never certain M Jackson was ‘Malcolm’ but being an Assistant Junior Engineer (AJE) in 1969 was certain that particular ‘M’ was an ex Engineering Apprentice/ Cadet. I have no crew lists from March 1965 (Ships leaving drydock and therefore not the whole fleet) to August 1969, I have a full list of 1964 intake and so presumed he was therefore a 1965 intake.

I know approximately 20 1965 intake who were split amongst 7 major technical colleges but none ever mentioned his name, which is not unusual. Smiths Dock 1968/69 would fit in that period.

He seemed to have fast promotion from AJE-JE-4E and then remained 3E, and unusual (?) to be on /off Steam/Motor ships.

I do know a number of people he sailed with on the above ships, but again his name was never mentioned. A certain Lecky on Shipsnostalgia sailed with him on the Tenacity in 1977.

His possible highlight in BP was unfortunately to be on the Ambassador for a very short time when she sank January 1975.

Graham

Last edited by Graham Wallace; 11th January 2017 at 17:19..
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  #10  
Old 11th January 2017, 10:15
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Thank you for the time and effort in supplying me with this info Graham. I'm sure that he did go on to become chief engineer.
He had a bad experience on his first ship, three crew members were killed when a wire parted whilst berthing, I know from one of his letters to me just how badly it affected him, I believe two of them were cut in two, an upsetting thing for anyone, let alone a youngster on his first trip. Once again, many thanks.
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Old 11th January 2017, 17:22
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Thank you for the time and effort in supplying me with this info Graham. I'm sure that he did go on to become chief engineer.
He had a bad experience on his first ship, three crew members were killed when a wire parted whilst berthing, I know from one of his letters to me just how badly it affected him, I believe two of them were cut in two, an upsetting thing for anyone, let alone a youngster on his first trip. Once again, many thanks.
Yikes!, I'll have a look at some later years 1985 + and see if I can find him. of course he could have moved on.

Graham
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Old 13th January 2017, 10:52
david freeman david freeman is offline  
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Thank you for the time and effort in supplying me with this info Graham. I'm sure that he did go on to become chief engineer.
He had a bad experience on his first ship, three crew members were killed when a wire parted whilst berthing, I know from one of his letters to me just how badly it affected him, I believe two of them were cut in two, an upsetting thing for anyone, let alone a youngster on his first trip. Once again, many thanks.
Question Harlequin, was the incident at one of the buoyed berths in the eastern Med or off Banda Mashur in the gulf. I remember in my early days, and on the crude ships visiting both Lebanon and the other Syrian port (Tripoli and Banias)??? in the eastern med Buoyed berths and during mooring and un-mooring how scary the after poop was, especially if taking the log and one had to go either via the steering gear hatch or the funnel door to track done some log detail. Un-mooring I found most unpleasant because if one came out of a galley exit entry point the wires could be snaking down the deck and out over the bits. A change of underpants was required, and to a first tripper to these berths un-nerving
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Old 13th January 2017, 13:21
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Hi David, in answer to your query. I believe the incident occurred whilst the ship was being assisted by tugs when one of the lines parted, and that those involved were at their stations on the foc'sle head.
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Old 13th January 2017, 15:04
dougmcfarlane dougmcfarlane is offline  
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There was an incident with similarities in the early seventies. I believe it was on a River boat in Nigeria/ W Africa when a fo'csle 'dolly', pedestal- mounted, fairlead detached under mooring rope stress during mooring operations. A Russian/ eastern bloc doctor provided medical attention.
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Old 13th January 2017, 17:44
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Hi David, in answer to your query. I believe the incident occurred whilst the ship was being assisted by tugs when one of the lines parted, and that those involved were at their stations on the foc'sle head.
Was it not the Tweed incident? My Uncle was Cat Officer on there when it happened. No fatalities though. He did tell me his side of it. They got both ashore who had lost their legs. Sorry could have wires crossed with another incident though.
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Old 13th January 2017, 17:54
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Couldn't really say Kev, I was only told about this third party. I do remember being told in the letter I received that one of the crewmen had actually been decapitated. I believe the crew were either Indian or Pakistani.
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Old 13th January 2017, 18:04
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Couldn't really say Kev, I was only told about this third party. I do remember being told in the letter I received that one of the crewmen had actually been decapitated. I believe the crew were either Indian or Pakistani.
I think the Tweed was on her Maiden voyage when the incident occurred Harlequin. Not sure of the year but it was around the same time as the Renown incident maybe a little after. There are better BP historians than me on here who will probably be more specific Uncle was Cat officer on there also at the time. Defo no decapitations though.
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Old 13th January 2017, 19:56
brooksy brooksy is offline  
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I think on the Tweed one of the Old Man leads had only been tack welded to the deck and it just carried away with the weight that was on it.The Master at the Time was Gill Barber and I can remember him talking about it when we were on the Kiwi.I got the impression that he was effected by that incident as I suppose were many others on the Tweed at the time.
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Old 14th January 2017, 20:20
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I think on the Tweed one of the Old Man leads had only been tack welded to the deck and it just carried away with the weight that was on it.The Master at the Time was Gill Barber and I can remember him talking about it when we were on the Kiwi.I got the impression that he was effected by that incident as I suppose were many others on the Tweed at the time.
Aye Brooksy, the cause was one of the old man leads only being spot welded on according to my Uncle. He did the first aid on the 2 lads. Now here's something I can't verify or confirm so could be typing out of my proverbial. Uncle Tony told me he had heard one of the casualties took his own life a few years later. As I said can't confirm it as fact but neither could our Tony to be fair.
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Old 15th January 2017, 14:46
brooksy brooksy is offline  
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Aye Brooksy, the cause was one of the old man leads only being spot welded on according to my Uncle. He did the first aid on the 2 lads. Now here's something I can't verify or confirm so could be typing out of my proverbial. Uncle Tony told me he had heard one of the casualties took his own life a few years later. As I said can't confirm it as fact but neither could our Tony to be fair.
Kevjacko I heard the same that one of the lads took his own life.Whether this is true or not you know how rumours soon got around the fleet.
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