The Last Doxford - Page 2 - Ships Nostalgia
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The Last Doxford

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  #26  
Old 4th December 2016, 11:04
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Originally Posted by 760J9 View Post
There is some kind of a childish spate between Tyne and Wear Museums and Beamish about funding that has apparently meant people can't go into see it. it is in the Regional Museums Store where large exhibits are kept, the large sheds you referred to, adjacent to the model engineering shed. There is a really backward mindset in Museums hierarchy, where the public interest is the sacrificed on the altar of their own self interest. Take the working model of the Doxford 760J9 engine. It was built in Doxfords Engine works, by the tool room staff there. It is of a Sunderland designed and built engine, by a Sunderland Company whose origins can allegedly be traced back to the Knights of Willliam the conqueror who settled at Doxfordham in Northumberland. The model was in Sunderland Museum and loaned to what is now the Discovery Museum, then part of Tyne and Wear museums. When the museums were reorganized, the model mysteriously became the property of the discovery museum and will remain there. It belongs to and in Sunderland and is part of our local history and it should be back where it belongs. As for the 3 cylinder engine, I think it can be viewed by arrangement with the Doxford Engine Friends Association (DEFA). I will find out and post the details here when I do.
In the past I have experienced the disappearance of exhibits from a Museum which was down to the local Council and are somewhere in their storage facility never to be seen again it would seem.
I would be obliged if you could let me have the details and Thank You.
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  #27  
Old 4th December 2016, 12:28
Les Gibson Les Gibson is offline  
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Sailed on 2 ships with Doxfords. The 'Iron Crown' of Common brothers with a Scott Doxford, brilliant ran like a sewing machine. Then the 'Blanchland' Stevie Clarkes only the 2nd P type built was a disaster. Constantly breaking down culminating in crankcase explosion in the Pacific en route Pimentel to Aucland. Doxford sent a gang of fitters out to Auckland who decided that the shaft was not aligned with engine correctly!
Ship was eventually sold for scrap following severe damage to Main engine
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  #28  
Old 4th December 2016, 13:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewisholgerjorgensen View Post
never said it was, read carefully.
the Cammell Laird Fullagar, double acting engines with OP

Please read this very carefully I will only say this once a double acting engine is also reffed to as a double banger(fires on both strokes in the same cylinder) and the Fullagar is a 2 stroke OP.Here endth the lesson
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  #29  
Old 4th December 2016, 13:28
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Duncan112 Duncan112 is offline  
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Posted this link to my drop box before but may still be of some interest - brochure for Fullagar engine - photos of preserved one in my gallery

https://www.dropbox.com/s/9ynkx5dt9c...ngine.pdf?dl=0
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  #30  
Old 4th December 2016, 13:33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Les Gibson View Post
Sailed on 2 ships with Doxfords. The 'Iron Crown' of Common brothers with a Scott Doxford, brilliant ran like a sewing machine. Then the 'Blanchland' Stevie Clarkes only the 2nd P type built was a disaster. Constantly breaking down culminating in crankcase explosion in the Pacific en route Pimentel to Aucland. Doxford sent a gang of fitters out to Auckland who decided that the shaft was not aligned with engine correctly!
Ship was eventually sold for scrap following severe damage to Main engine
First 2P'swas MONTANA & TUDOR PRINCE
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  #31  
Old 4th December 2016, 14:21
Les Gibson Les Gibson is offline  
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'Blanchland' may have been 3rd one then! I know it was one of the first and I think 'Taybank' of Bank line was an early one with problems.
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  #32  
Old 4th December 2016, 14:24
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Originally Posted by A.D.FROST View Post
First 2P'swas MONTANA & TUDOR PRINCE
Was it the Tudor Prince that had the Crankcase explosion?
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  #33  
Old 4th December 2016, 16:16
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Originally Posted by Les Gibson View Post
'Blanchland' may have been 3rd one then! I know it was one of the first and I think 'Taybank' of Bank line was an early one with problems.
Well Les you were possibly on the 4th.one.(59 built)
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  #34  
Old 4th December 2016, 16:20
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Originally Posted by chadburn View Post
Was it the Tudor Prince that had the Crankcase explosion?
She had problems with cross-head keeps but I don't no of any c/c explosions but I know the NORTH SANDS (J) had one (killed the2nd.)
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  #35  
Old 4th December 2016, 19:16
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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Aye, that was the vessel the North Sands, thanks A.D.
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  #36  
Old 4th December 2016, 20:37
howardws howardws is offline  
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Originally Posted by Stephen J. Card View Post
Once in a while I went below to enjoy the views!
My first ship as a watchkeeper (1966) was Caltex Calcutta with a 5 cylinder Doxford LB. I was in the last few months of my apprenticeship and was put on the 8-12 on my own - (my salary went up from £25-0s-0d to £68-13s-4d and I was called Senior Engineer Apprentice by Caltex and Acting Fiver by ship staff). I used to spent a small part of every watch standing in the top port forward corner of the engine room watching what seemed poetry in motion to me!
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  #37  
Old 4th December 2016, 21:35
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Originally Posted by howardws View Post
I used to spent a small part of every watch standing in the top port forward corner of the engine room watching what seemed poetry in motion to me!

Even did the same on Loch Lomond. Walk behind the wheelhouse, step into the funnel door and you could see the tops of the big 9 cyl Kincaid B&W. Sometimes in pale green, sometimes pale blue. I think the 2/E's use to change the colour every year or so. Didn't matter the colour... it was usually spotless.
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  #38  
Old 19th May 2017, 16:39
New Haven Neil New Haven Neil is offline  
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As a cadet I sailed on a 76J6 in Bibby Line's Warwickshire, 1978 I think. Ran like a sewing machine, but was a complete pig to start astern. This was allegedly because as they were experimenting with increasing turbocharging, they gave her upper piston cranks more lead to get a bigger exhaust pulse. Of course going astern the timing was all to hell.... IIRC the lead was alleged to be 11 degrees, but as I only sailed on the one I don't know what a 'normal' lead was on a J type. I have to say I loved it as an engine, but I didn't have to change a combustion belt in that 5 months! Ahem.
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  #39  
Old 20th May 2017, 00:59
JohnBP JohnBP is offline  
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British Freedom, P type, ran well, couple of burst cooler pipes, constant separator cleaning....
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  #40  
Old 20th May 2017, 07:55
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British Freedom, P type, ran well, couple of burst cooler pipes, constant separator cleaning....
Unless she was re-engined? she had a Wallsend/Doxford 67LB6 ('P' circa >1959)
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  #41  
Old 20th May 2017, 08:41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New Haven Neil View Post
As a cadet I sailed on a 76J6 in Bibby Line's Warwickshire, 1978 I think. Ran like a sewing machine, but was a complete pig to start astern. This was allegedly because as they were experimenting with increasing turbocharging, they gave her upper piston cranks more lead to get a bigger exhaust pulse. Of course going astern the timing was all to hell.... IIRC the lead was alleged to be 11 degrees, but as I only sailed on the one I don't know what a 'normal' lead was on a J type. I have to say I loved it as an engine, but I didn't have to change a combustion belt in that 5 months! Ahem.
Lead - an interesting concept - on Bank Lines 76J6 Corabank Class the lead on the cranks was 9 degrees 28' but because of the differential stroke of the upper and lower pistons this translated to a difference of just under 2 degrees between IDC (Least combustion space volume) and TDC on the lower piston.

The 76J4C Fish class had zero lead - the engine would not stop naturally at a dead spot, but if it was left in one position after maintenance it wouldn't kick on air and had to be turned to a more suitable position.
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  #42  
Old 20th May 2017, 09:00
Somerton Somerton is offline  
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It was very interesting to see the post about the 2 Port Line ships . Both were fine ships . In days before the box boats ! I sailed in the Port Sydney in 1958 and in the Port Melbourne in. 1960 . Great ships . I have very happy memories of those days . Many years later I saw the Port Line crest from the bow of the Port Sydney in the Maritime museum in Melbourne . Happy days indeed. I was on deck . Alex C .
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  #43  
Old 20th May 2017, 09:44
New Haven Neil New Haven Neil is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duncan112 View Post
Lead - an interesting concept - on Bank Lines 76J6 Corabank Class the lead on the cranks was 9 degrees 28' but because of the differential stroke of the upper and lower pistons this translated to a difference of just under 2 degrees between IDC (Least combustion space volume) and TDC on the lower piston.

The 76J4C Fish class had zero lead - the engine would not stop naturally at a dead spot, but if it was left in one position after maintenance it wouldn't kick on air and had to be turned to a more suitable position.
Our Lancashire and IRC Herefordshire were 'allegedly' add-ons to Bank line builds, the same as Corabank. The Warwickshire was equally a Bank Line copy but of an earlier 3+2 hold configuration class. Nice old ship, good classic lines, it was a good trip but that astern starting.....grrr. Did my first watches on my own on her, as the second preferred his bed of a morning. Irish and liked a beer.... Totally handamatic, I learnt quickly!
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  #44  
Old 27th May 2017, 16:52
JohnBP JohnBP is offline  
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AD you are correct, should have checked my discharge book first, good catch....
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