Small ore carriers - Ships Nostalgia
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Small ore carriers

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  #1  
Old 17th April 2017, 08:13
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Small ore carriers

I was looking at a picture of my old ship, the Arisaig and noticed that on the fore side of the goalposts, plumbing the forecastle, seem to be two stowed derrick's. Some of the other ore carriers seem to have an "ordinary" foremast, instead of the goalposts so I am wondering what purpose these derricks would serve? They were certainly never used in my time!
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  #2  
Old 17th April 2017, 09:13
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Must admit that in the hundreds of visits to 'my ore carriers' I never noticed any difference in deck equipment....perhaps someone like Varley can answer you??

Geoff
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  #3  
Old 17th April 2017, 09:39
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George, the derricks were mainly used (if there were no shore-side cranes available ) to load heavy stores eg. coils of rope or pallets of paint etc....

Frank

Last edited by Frank P; 17th April 2017 at 09:54..
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  #4  
Old 17th April 2017, 09:58
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank P View Post
George, the derricks were mainly used (if there were no shore-side cranes available ) to load heavy stores eg. coils of rope or pallets of paint etc....

Frank
Sounds about right. I have a recollection of a hatch on the forecastle , welded shut but really little more.
Thanks anyway
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  #5  
Old 17th April 2017, 10:37
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Varley Varley is offline   SN Supporter
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George, Geoff. Not really my bag. One for the Mates. Only carried ore in OBOs and never saw one of those 'geared' (except PROBO MV Arctic which I take as a special case and those were cranes).
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  #6  
Old 17th April 2017, 11:56
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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Have sailed on many of the wee ore carriers ( including the Arisaig ) . The forward
derricks plumbed the stores hatch into the focsle but they would be welded in position by rust as I never remember them being topped.
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  #7  
Old 17th April 2017, 15:03
vickentallen vickentallen is offline  
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The only time I saw the after derrick rigged on the "Morven" (Denholms Ore carrier) was to load Fingers Fleck (Chief Engineer)'s Organ (piano type),, presento from Mitsubishi Drydock Yokohama, onboard . Sure livened up the parties..
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  #8  
Old 19th April 2017, 08:21
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TOM ALEXANDER TOM ALEXANDER is offline  
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On the Sagamore, the goal posts forward, I believe, were to support the forward mast for the forward masthead light, and also to show where the front of the ship was when the rest of it was submerged in the North Atlantic.
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  #9  
Old 19th April 2017, 15:31
George Bis George Bis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TOM ALEXANDER View Post
On the Sagamore, the goal posts forward, I believe, were to support the forward mast for the forward masthead light, and also to show where the front of the ship was when the rest of it was submerged in the North Atlantic.
Sounds like some of the Arisaig,s voyages!
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  #10  
Old 19th April 2017, 18:45
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They weren't known as "BISCO submarines" for no reason!........................
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  #11  
Old 19th April 2017, 20:03
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They weren't known as "BISCO submarines" for no reason!........................
How dare you!
BISC(ore) geoff
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  #12  
Old 20th April 2017, 07:55
George Bis George Bis is offline
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We did think about a periscope on the Arisaig!
.
It was said that Houlder Bros. insisted that their ore carriers went south in the winter while we went north but I am sure that someone from Houlders would tell it differently.

Joking apart they were good, seaworthy ships. Whatever the weather they got the job done.
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  #13  
Old 20th April 2017, 08:11
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Bis View Post
We did think about a periscope on the Arisaig!
.
It was said that Houlder Bros. insisted that their ore carriers went south in the winter while we went north but I am sure that someone from Houlders would tell it differently.

Joking apart they were good, seaworthy ships. Whatever the weather they got the job done.
Well George , they may have got the job done but they were
underpowered , uncomfortable and hardworking ships. They suited some because of being back in the UK regularly but they were no
holiday.
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  #14  
Old 20th April 2017, 08:48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Bis View Post
We did think about a periscope on the Arisaig!
.
It was said that Houlder Bros. insisted that their ore carriers went south in the winter while we went north but I am sure that someone from Houlders would tell it differently.

Joking apart they were good, seaworthy ships. Whatever the weather they got the job done.
Don't know where that story came from but it certainly was an instruction that didn't reach or was ignored by the Houlder carriers I was on. Frequently from Belle Isle to the Bristol Channel, the outside decks were no go areas and it was normal to look at green water outside the ports for a full week. They were well named submarines. The two bigger ones were no better.
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  #15  
Old 20th April 2017, 10:28
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As a former Ship Scheduling Controller of BISCO/BSC fleets I can confirm that no such instructions were issued by any Owners at any time.....and would have been ignored anyway!

Geoff
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  #16  
Old 20th April 2017, 16:36
Shipbuilder Shipbuilder is offline
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When I was in the Sagamore in 1964, a huge sea smashed over the bow and ripped both derrick posts out of the deck. The derricks whipped back, and bent the heels by about 90 degrees. One of the posts was bent about two feet out of true at the top. We were outward bound from Newport towards Savona with 4,000 tons of coiled steel sheeting aboard. It all shifted, and a lot of it unravelled. It was an experimental outward cargo. One of the Skyfotos images from the starboard bow shows the broken derricks bent backwards, and dumped into the space in front of Nr1, where they were tied down until they could be cut away in Savona. I never saw the derricks used, and I was there for two years!
Bob
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  #17  
Old 20th April 2017, 19:57
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
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I was in the Pennyworth and the Monksgarth. Both were bad sea ships and very uncomfortable in any sort of sea. Semi submersible with the ability to roll on wet grass would describe them both.
However, they both were good feeders and I first ate a wonderful Geordie dish called Panaskelty or Pan Haggerty on these ships.
One thing I recall was that there was very little opportunity to work out on deck because of the constant foul weather, so we did a lot of sugi and painting in the tunnel and in the accommodation.
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Old 21st April 2017, 00:16
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Kennedy View Post
I was in the Pennyworth and the Monksgarth. Both were bad sea ships and very uncomfortable in any sort of sea. Semi submersible with the ability to roll on wet grass would describe them both.
However, they both were good feeders and I first ate a wonderful Geordie dish called Panaskelty or Pan Haggerty on these ships.
One thing I recall was that there was very little opportunity to work out on deck because of the constant foul weather, so we did a lot of sugi and painting in the tunnel and in the accommodation.
pat panakelty .lovely from the north east wife was from durham had it once a week keep well tony
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  #19  
Old 21st April 2017, 09:24
John Cassels John Cassels is offline  
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The "Large "ore carriers ( Dunkyle etc) were not much better. Same discomforts
only on a larger scale. Was on two of them ; Dunkyle and the "Drunken Duncan".
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  #20  
Old 21st April 2017, 19:25
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pat panakelty .lovely from the north east wife was from durham had it once a week keep well tony
That was it Tony, a sort of corned beef bake. We got it a couple of times a week on the Pennyworth, plus corned beef hash cakes for breakfast, delicious!
Regards,
Pat
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  #21  
Old 21st April 2017, 21:06
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Indeed one of my favourite dishes as a kid in the Boro.....best one I had apart from at home was on the other Dalgleish ore carrier...Ravensworth..

geoff
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  #22  
Old 21st April 2017, 22:48
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Not sure which ship this is. I worked on the Finnimore Meadow which was very similar.
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  #23  
Old 22nd April 2017, 22:01
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Nick- that's my 1975 pic of Souter's (Bamburgh Shipping Co) "Bamburgh Castle" at Glasgow General Terminus Quay.....
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" I live in retirement now and through my window comes the sound of seagulls
And sets my mind remembering
The evening stars like memories sail far beyond the distant trees
Way out across the open seas
I hear them sing .........................
And sometime (I) think in all this world,the saddest thing to be
Old Admirals who feel the wind,and never put to sea "


Al Stewart, "Old Admirals", "Past Present & Future LP"
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