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500 kHz Recordings A9M

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  #26  
Old 30th July 2015, 02:33
Paul Braxton Paul Braxton is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finbar O'Connor View Post
Hello Paul,

I have a full recording of a DDD SOS broadcast on
500 khz from GLD.

Would you like a copy of this posted here. I say this
because neither GNI or GLD appear on the recording
I have just uploaded.

Regards
Finbar

Absolutely, Finbar. That would really rekindle some memories if you could. Thank you very much in anticipation.

Best regards, Paul
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  #27  
Old 30th July 2015, 04:00
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Music to my ears, I miss listening to 500. Thanks for the memories Finbar.
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  #28  
Old 30th July 2015, 13:13
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings DDDSOSdeGLD 8TH March 1994

Greetings again,

Please find attached another dose of Nostalgia
with this recording of LandsendRadio/GLD, with
a lovely sounding MCW transmitter on 500 khz.

From the DTG of the broadcast, ie 081229 utc,
this recording was made in daylight, yet shows the
range of reception SAG in the north, up to Wick,
yet also copying the ships answering GLD's broadcast,
being well south of my home QTH.

Note the resounding blast from GPK, thundering in to
my Regenerate receiver. Distance from here to GPK
being only 100 miles.

I still have SUH , 4XO recording waiting if anyone
wants them posted here.

Sit back and enjoy this recording from over 21 years
ago.

Regards
Finbar
Attached Files
File Type: mp3 RegSosGLD080394Mod1.mp3 (9.53 MB, 172 views)
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  #29  
Old 30th July 2015, 14:40
R651400 R651400 is offline  
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Mni tks agn Fb... First time I've heard "Man overboard" (French trawlerman perhaps?) as a full-blown distress.
Having said that the MF "propagation" between EJM and the UK/EU coastal waters is truly something else..
No comment on the standard of the morse!
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  #30  
Old 31st July 2015, 00:38
Paul Braxton Paul Braxton is offline  
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Very many thanks, Finbar, for that piece of radio nostalgia. Can't help wondering why use of SOS instead of XXX. I had a man overboard once (in the Pacific) and used the urgency XXX which is what the book said if I remember it aright.

Thanks agn. and best regards. Paul
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  #31  
Old 31st July 2015, 14:33
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Was there not a proviso that if there was risk of an imminent life or death situation then it could be raised to a Distress. Seem to think this came up in a thread sometime ago. The quote below comes from a current web site for use of the Distress signal.

- The likely emergencies are man overboard, being holed or running aground, fire, and medical emergencies.





Hawkey01
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  #32  
Old 31st July 2015, 15:49
R651400 R651400 is offline  
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...and DDD signifies the controlling station ie GLD is relaying the message for the vessel in distress.
Below is my transcript of the DDD SOS GLD message which has a couple or more interesting points. Dtg given in UTC.. Coastguard control Swansea so why not Ilfracombe/GIL or Anglesey/GLV as DDD control . Hope I've got the position right! If so where?

DDD SOS DDD de GLD... Sanmornik/FTYO info nr 1... Sanmornik/FTYO in position 5115n 00626.50w man overboard. Immediate assistance required. Rescue helicopter 190 proceeding. Swansea coastguard co-ordinating.. GLD 081229utc...
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  #33  
Old 1st August 2015, 12:24
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Malcolm,

the distress area is almost dead centre from both stations. I cannot now remember what our area was at GIL.
What I would suggest is that this could have happened after the cessation of 500
at GIL and its closure. It was remote during the DOC system. The controlling
station would have been GLD who still had WT.

Neville - Hawkey01
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  #34  
Old 1st August 2015, 15:02
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings A9M sends HNY greetings

Hi,

Regarding the DDDSOS de GLD, and the non use of
GIL, I had assumed that GIL had already closed on
500, at that stage, if my memory serves me well,
but stand to be corrected. Just not sure.

Attached is another long haul DX signal on 500 khz
from A9M, sending a Happy New Year greetings
message on 500 khz. This is followed by several
other stations, ship and shore, including an Italian
vessel sending a TR to TriesteRadio IQX. Both are
heard at reasonable strength.

I have found the recording of GNF close down, in
1992, but have yet to clean it up. The original
has lots of noise. With filtering this can be sorted.

Regards
Finbar EJM ( was GMH until 1950 )
Attached Files
File Type: mp3 A9MsendsHNYgreetingsIQXworksTR500kHz.mp3 (1.57 MB, 78 views)
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  #35  
Old 2nd August 2015, 09:50
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Finbar, I see on your profile you're still working at Malin Head. Is Valentia still open too?

John T
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  #36  
Old 2nd August 2015, 15:09
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings Malin Head and Valentia Radio

Hello John,

You asked about Valentia Radio EJK. Yes it is still
operational.
Both stations EJM and EJK were given a huge
revamp over 2 years ago, particularly Malin Head,
where the operations room was transformed into
a much more space saving and effective set up. A
new purpose built command and control equipment
container was installed beside the original building
(built by the GPO in 1913 ). The stations transmitter
room was also re-wired as was the rest of the building.

Both stations use a pair of 150 foot towers, insulated,
and fed against a proper earth mat. Between these towers
is the original 500 / 421 khz Tee antenna. This is now used
for Navtex on 518 khz and 490 khz. The 490 khz
service is to provide the UK Coastguard weather broadcasts
for the North and West of Scotland.

Transmitter power is 1 kw on R/T and Navtex, but the
Navtex transmitter is reduced in power during night time
transmission slots, as per regulation.

I am now retired from EJM, my last watch, a night duty
was in March 2009. I served there for 34 years. I was
the guy who sent the last CQ de EJM close down, CW
transmission, on 500 khz, on the 31st December 1988.

Regards
Finbar
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  #37  
Old 2nd August 2015, 23:55
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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Thanks for the info, Finbar. I was on Valentia last year - it never have occurred to me that EJK was still going but I suppose modern security ideas wouldn't permit a visit.

John T
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  #38  
Old 3rd August 2015, 15:22
R651400 R651400 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkey01 View Post
the distress area is almost dead centre from both stations. I cannot now remember what our area was at GIL.
Neville if my morse hasn't failed me and you take the co-ordinates as per Swansea coastguard sent in GLD's DDD message the man overboard is somewhere inland near Godalming!
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  #39  
Old 3rd August 2015, 16:16
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Malcolm,

truthfully I did not listen to it all too closely. Just thought there was typo in the QTH and just dropped a decimal point into it ie 06.26W hence me saying mid area. Put it off the north west coast of Devon or there abouts.
Had another listen and you are totally correct it does give the psn as 00626.50W but long way from Godalming. If you use 51.15N and 006.26W in Google maps it comes up as I said.

Neville - Hawkey01
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  #40  
Old 4th August 2015, 05:03
R651400 R651400 is offline  
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Agreed Neville but if that extra zero on the longitude was misconstrued to QTH 51.15N 00.626W my GPS registers it as nr Godalming.
Still to this day can never fathom out why UK coast station staff didn't co-ordinate the distress situation themselves as I'm sure was done by other European coast stations eg DAN.
Maybe Finbar can tell us how the distress procedure worked at EJM?
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  #41  
Old 4th August 2015, 14:38
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If my memory serves me correctly if we received info from CG it was sent as received until we had QSO'd with them to correct said error. Also when everything went modern as we all know we seem to have ended up with deg,mins,secs, and something else tagged on.
Never thought of 00.6. Personally I would not have sent the info until it had been clarified. How times do change!

Neville.

Last edited by hawkey01; 4th August 2015 at 14:42..
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  #42  
Old 4th August 2015, 15:04
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings Malin Head CG Radio EJM MRSC

Hello R651400

You ask a very interesting question regarding co-ordination of distress and rescue at Coast Radio Station in the UK and what the situation was and is at our Irish Coast Radio Stations.

With our history of being a UK coast radio station, GMH, up to the 31st of December 1949 and with the formation of the Irish Republic and the break with the British Commonwealth at midnight of that day, the station was from then fully run by the Irish Post Office, callsign EJM.

I can only comment on the proceedure for co-ordination during the 1960's onward, which was done by the Irish Navy, at their base at Haulbowline, in County Cork. Effectively the nations marine MRCC.
This was transferred to ATC at Shannon airport in the early 1970's
and remained like that until the coast radio stations were moved from Post and Telegraphs to the Department of Marine, in 1993 and we
got a new name for our service, IMES, Irish Marine Emergency Service. The MRCC function was moved from ATC Shannon to the new HQ, in Dublin. This was manned by marine Radio Officers and
the VHF coverage for Dublin and Wicklow, which had been controlled from Malin Head Radio was also transferred there.
In 2000 both Malin Head and Valentia also became MRSC's.
This is the current status for all 3 stations.

The operation of joint MRCC/MRSC/CoastRadio stations is a much
more efficient and effective situation and has worked very very well.

Might I add that we manage rescue for much more than the marine
area. This includes the Inland river and lake system ( with two VHF
stations, Lough Ree CG Radio, controlled from Malin Head, and
Lough Derg CG Radio, controlled from Valentia ). Island medical
evacuation to hospital. Mountain and Cave Rescue, plus hospital to
hospital helicopter transfers by our 4 dedicated helicopters. Cliff
rescue, lifeguard and missing persons search and rescue, is also
part of our remit.

Needless to say Weather broadcasts, Navigational warnings, taking
TR's ( from the many island ferries), Gale warnings and running the
Navtex system. We now cover the West Coast of Scotland on Navtex for UK Coastguard weather broadcasts, on 490 khz.

Sadly, a few years ago, we lost our Link Call service, though the
phone patch system is still used in medical emergencies to facilitate hospitals to talk directly to ships, via MF or VHF.

AIS is monitored and is available from all our sites.

Finally, I can confirm that, from my experience, coast radio stations work far better, when, with proper training, they co-ordinate their
own distress and rescue work. Might I also add that staffing stations with people who have worked and have experience of life at sea
is vital. The just KNOW what it is like out there...
Staff training is carried out every 3 to 4 years and entails 3 weeks
at the National Maritime College in Cork.

Best regards
Finbar EJM ( Retired)
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  #43  
Old 5th August 2015, 11:37
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Finbar,

many thanks for that post. Very interesting.

Hawkey01
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  #44  
Old 5th August 2015, 14:35
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings NorthforelandRadio GNF QRT 500

Attached is a recording of the closure of Northforeland Radio GNF
on 500 khz, in 1992.

It is surprising that no other UK coast station calls or acknowledges
the broadcast from GNF.

The recording is longer than the actual broadcast from GNF, to
give athmosphere to the sounds of radio traffic on 500 khz at
that time.

Regards
Finbar EJM
Attached Files
File Type: mp3 GNFQRT160292FilterMod1Clip2.mp3 (9.06 MB, 81 views)
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  #45  
Old 5th August 2015, 15:48
trotterdotpom trotterdotpom is offline  
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"Agreed Neville but if that extra zero on the longitude was misconstrued to QTH 51.15N 00.626W my GPS registers it as nr Godalming."

Just as an aside, there is a memorial to Jack Phillips, the RO on Titanic, at Godalming, from whence he came. Spooky or what?

John T
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  #46  
Old 5th August 2015, 21:34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finbar O'Connor View Post
With our history of being a UK coast radio station, GMH, up to the 31st of December 1949 and with the formation of the Irish Republic and the break with the British Commonwealth at midnight of that day, the station was from then fully run by the Irish Post Office, callsign EJM.
Is that the correct year Finbar? Think it might have been somewhat earlier. (You may still be able to edit it).
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  #47  
Old 5th August 2015, 22:13
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Ron, I googled Malinhead Radio EJM and the following webpage gives the date of callsign change as 1951:-
http://www.maritimeradio.pro/ireland/ejm.htm
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  #48  
Old 5th August 2015, 23:28
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I stand corrected. Thanks for that.
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  #49  
Old 6th August 2015, 01:44
Finbar O'Connor Finbar O'Connor is offline  
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500 kHz Recordings GMH to EJM 1st January 1950

Hello Ron and Jim,

I can confirm that both Malin Head Radio and Valentia Radio
used their respective British callsigns, ie GMH and GCK, until
the 31st December 1949.

There is clear notation of the callsigns used and the move,
in records of the period. Historical records can be examined at
Kew.

Jim, the website link you quote is wrong regarding the
changeover year. Use of EJM and EJK started on the 1st
January 1950.

I also note that the IOWT ( Inspector of Wireless Telegraphy)
writes, in May of 1949 that Oban Radio Station will open
at 0800 gmt May 16th, on a temporary experimental basis,
call sign being GNE. Watch on 1650 kc/s, Oban transmitting on
1650, 1841 and 2500 kc/s A3. Service for small craft only.

W/T sked times given ( several). Oban will call ships on 1605 kc/s
A2

Regards
Finbar EJM
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  #50  
Old 6th August 2015, 09:10
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Thanks Finbar, I knew the change was post war and just googled to confirm (the mighty google gets it wrong again).
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