Tank Cleaning - Ships Nostalgia
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Tank Cleaning

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  #1  
Old 23rd June 2008, 16:23
d.r.wing d.r.wing is offline  
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Question Tank Cleaning

Anyone know when the canvas wind sails were introduced to vent tanks, and how do they do it nowadays?
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  #2  
Old 23rd June 2008, 17:20
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I can't answer Your question about the canvas vents but nowadays they use air driven extractor fans to vent the tanks.
Tony.
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  #3  
Old 23rd June 2008, 17:34
Steve Woodward Steve Woodward is offline  
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Heres another way : JETFAN125
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  #4  
Old 23rd June 2008, 17:45
d.r.wing d.r.wing is offline  
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Water/Air driven fans! pretty obvious really I wonder why they took so long to be developed. We also used to wash the tanks down with hoses shows how long I've been away from the action.

Last edited by d.r.wing : 23rd June 2008 at 17:46. Reason: Spelling error
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  #5  
Old 23rd June 2008, 21:16
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afuel afuel is offline  
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In late 60's we were using Butterworth steam driven/steam heated sea water.

Butterworths were mounted on round deck mounts (cover unbolted and removed) and then the 2 large nozzles (Butterworth machine) spinning at 150 rpm or so would be lowered every few minutes or so to wash sides of tanks down.

The deck gang would go down into tanks, after the waste overboard and muck out the heavy stuff with buckets and rope. Until tanks were clean and gas free.

Hard, hot, dirty work.
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  #6  
Old 24th June 2008, 11:10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afuel View Post
In late 60's we were using Butterworth steam driven/steam heated sea water.

Butterworths were mounted on round deck mounts (cover unbolted and removed) and then the 2 large nozzles (Butterworth machine) spinning at 150 rpm or so would be lowered every few minutes or so to wash sides of tanks down.

The deck gang would go down into tanks, after the waste overboard and muck out the heavy stuff with buckets and rope. Until tanks were clean and gas free.

Hard, hot, dirty work.
afuel,

You are right about the hot and hard dirty work but it meant that there was plenty of overtime to be had.

Cheers Frank
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  #7  
Old 24th June 2008, 12:42
JimC JimC is offline  
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Sure do remember the Butterworth system, the brass buckets and shovels etc. Also remember using canvas venting systems which consisted of a four sided canvas 'sail' suspended over the tank lid feeding down into a long canvas tube extending to just above the deep floors. First time I used these was in 1954 so they've been around at least as long as that.
I also remember tank cleaning at anchor at The Tail o' The Bank prior to going up to Barclay Curle Drydock. Our anti-pollution system was a joy to behold. It consisted of pumping all the dirty oil-sludge filled waste water from the Butterworth system into No.6 Centre tank. When that tank was full; it was emptied overboard. Since oil floats on water - it was the job of the pumpman and apprentice to watch for the first sign of oil emitting from the overboard discharge. When this 'showed' the valves were closed and the cleaning operation continued until we had a load of sludge in No.6 and all but one clean, gas free tank. The sludge was then pumped into a purpose-built sludge barge together with the remaining material from No.6.
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  #8  
Old 24th June 2008, 15:29
d.r.wing d.r.wing is offline  
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I was a lecky and not involved with tank cleaning as such, I do remember a
2nd enr. making a venturie out of brass to suck the water/sludge from the tank being cleaned to storage. I think we used to discharge the sludge etc to shore tanks. I started work as a dockyard apprentice in 1952 and tankers along side were using the canvas vents then.
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  #9  
Old 24th June 2008, 20:20
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When I was a tanker stiff

we were not set up for a slops tank. When we changed cargo we would go in and discharge our product then leave and go outside until we were well out of sight of land, then drift around out there and Butterworth our tanks, pumping everything overboard into the sea.

There we sat drifting with our oily puddle. Every so often the mate would call down and we'd engage the engine and move out of our mess. When done we would go back in and get inspected and load product.

I attach an image of the ship the USS Pecos AO-65. In the early 1970's the US Navy enlistments were WAY down. Can you say Vietnam. So the Navy took their men off their auxiliary ships and put them on ships with guns, and hired we civilians to operate their auxiliary ships. The Navy brought this ship into a Navy Shipyard and the 285 enlisted and officers who ran her all left and we 31 much higher paid civilians took over.

The only changes were they took off the guns and took away 250 six high berth racks. Since the Navy had fourteen people on each engine watch, eight in the boiler room alone, we wondered if their ships we different. Nope. Same automatic equipment by the same maker as the civilian T2's.

We ran as we usually did with a Fireman/Watertender, an Oiler and an Assistant Engineer each of three watches.

The second picture show the bos'n, left and the pumpman. This civilian crew thing on military vessels was an example of what we COULD do. Sail a conventional ship with 31 total crew. The contracts were placed out to bid and companies put together the best deal they could. BUT ALL the Unions involved had to agree too. To reduced manning. So we only had one instead of two pumpmen, so when we cleaned tanks he earned 26 hours of overtime for each 24 hours he worked. And the pumpman and bos'n were duplicates of each other and during the hours of darkness they each got some sleep spelling each other.

There was a skipper and three versus four mates. The Chief Mate worked the 8-12 watch. All the more reason for a strong bos'n and pumpman. A Chief Engineer and three assistants, the 1 A/E, me, stood the 8-12 watch.

Greg Hayden
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File Type: jpg USS-Pecos-AO-65.jpg (23.4 KB, 161 views)
File Type: jpg PecosButterworthing-Bosn-left-Pumpman-right.jpg (49.7 KB, 150 views)
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  #10  
Old 30th June 2008, 18:40
Shiny Shiny is offline  
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Wasn't there something called "gollering" a sort of water driven vacuum/hoover you took down into the tank to suck up the sludge?
I remember replacing the anodes as well - big ingots bolted inside the tank to reduce rusting(?)
Shiny
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  #11  
Old 2nd July 2008, 14:30
JimC JimC is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiny View Post
Wasn't there something called "gollering" a sort of water driven vacuum/hoover you took down into the tank to suck up the sludge?
I remember replacing the anodes as well - big ingots bolted inside the tank to reduce rusting(?)
Shiny
Don't remember 'gollering' but seem to recall using a 'stripping pump'.
Long time ago - for me 47 years to be exact!

Jim C.
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  #12  
Old 3rd July 2008, 17:27
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andysk andysk is offline   SN Supporter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
........ Also remember using canvas venting systems which consisted of a four sided canvas 'sail' suspended over the tank lid feeding down into a long canvas tube extending to just above the deep floors. First time I used these was in 1954 so they've been around at least as long as that ........
We used exactly the same system on Hector Heron in the mid 1970's - see the attached pic.
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File Type: jpg HH Gas Freeing (Show 2 - 187).jpg (82.9 KB, 141 views)
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  #13  
Old 3rd July 2008, 18:22
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Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is offline  
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Does anyone remember the tank cleaning ship, "Tulip Glen" which was usually based in Glasgow, although she hailed from Birkenhead.
She was a small, maybe 600 ton vessel that would come alongside the ship.
And they would hoist steam hoses on board and insert them into the tanks. Then live steam would do the bulk of the work. They still had to send a black gang down afterwards to mop up, but I believe it was a lot faster and more thorough than any other method.
Pat
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  #14  
Old 4th July 2008, 17:18
chadburn chadburn is offline  
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I have a feeling that the "Tulip Glen" was an ex Navy vessel (steam job T.E.) something like an old oiler which was converted for oil tank slopping the name sounds familiar to me. At the same time there use to be a de-gaussing vessel doing the rounds although not at the same time on the same ship!!
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  #15  
Old 11th July 2008, 18:00
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiny View Post
Wasn't there something called "gollering" a sort of water driven vacuum/hoover you took down into the tank to suck up the sludge?
I remember replacing the anodes as well - big ingots bolted inside the tank to reduce rusting(?)
Shiny
Suspect you mean GOLAR fans?

The sucking of sludge may well have been done by an eductor (venturi effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venturi_effect) or the Wilden Pump (http://www.wildenpump.com/catalog/category_2.cfm), both still used around the coast today.
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  #16  
Old 11th July 2008, 18:13
NINJA NINJA is offline  
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When I was on the Cavendish, a LPG tanker in the early 70's we still erected sails to help in the gas freeing of the cargo tanks before going into drydock.
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  #17  
Old 11th July 2008, 19:15
Steve Woodward Steve Woodward is offline  
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I remember a device for removing sludge and scale from cargo tanks, it consisted of a hopper feeding the muck shovelled up from the bottom of the tanks into a set of rotating crushers to break up the larger pieces of scale then feeding the sludge into a powerful water-jet eductor which propelled the sludge out of the tank and over the side, this is old technology and now banned, the name of the device was a Beaver-Jet
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  #18  
Old 18th July 2008, 23:34
Monket Monket is offline  
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Nobody's mentioned the slug of "Board of Trade " rum you were given when you came out of the tanks.
You were supposed to drink it straight down which would take your breath away and expel the gas from your lungs.
Where were "elf and safety" when you needed them.
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  #19  
Old 19th July 2008, 01:23
Raz Jones Raz Jones is offline  
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On Esso Tankers in the early 60's we used the Butterworth Tank washing system and the Vent-Axia water powered extracting machines we AB's were always well rewarded with liberal tots of 4 Bells rum by the Chief Officers at every break for mealtimes and smoko's etc, great days they were ha ha ha.
Regards Ray
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  #20  
Old 19th July 2008, 09:27
jimmys jimmys is offline  
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Tankcleaning

I worked for Texaco and we did a lot of tank cleaning. In the early eighties I was seconded across to PanOcean Anco on the Anco Sceptre for motor time and to obtain chemical and chemical product endorsements on my certificate. I was there for six months.
On these ships the deck crowd "puddled" the cargo tanks with buckets and pans to clean them out. They were welcome to it.
The vessel also had a Golar vent fan. It was driven by steam turbine and this fan was "The Mad Geordie", built by a famous Newcasle company.
I was a steam man and was asked by the Mate to operate it, the motor men would not go near it. No wonder it was aptly named.

regards
jimmys
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  #21  
Old 19th July 2008, 13:03
randcmackenzie randcmackenzie is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Woodward View Post
I remember a device for removing sludge and scale from cargo tanks, it consisted of a hopper feeding the muck shovelled up from the bottom of the tanks into a set of rotating crushers to break up the larger pieces of scale then feeding the sludge into a powerful water-jet eductor which propelled the sludge out of the tank and over the side, this is old technology and now banned, the name of the device was a Beaver-Jet
Dickerman pump was another type of sludge eductor which could be powered either by air or water pressure.

Still widely used for residue removal from ballast tanks, dry cargo holds etc, and very effective.

Depending on the residue it goes faster than you can shovel.

I know of one class of OBO which has the whole system permanently in place for dry cargo residue disposal.
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  #22  
Old 19th July 2008, 13:28
dmor319 dmor319 is offline  
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Tank Cleaninig

Here is a photo of tank cleaning of the DERBY mid sixties.
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  #23  
Old 20th July 2008, 17:18
dmor319 dmor319 is offline  
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Here is a photo of tank cleaning of the DERBY mid sixties.
I must ammend this as we were tank diving.The shot of rum that we got must have been watered down as it tasted like old spice.
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  #24  
Old 20th July 2008, 17:37
Bill Davies Bill Davies is offline  
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Gas Freeing on OBOs
One of the first OBOs I was on involved making ready the ship for her first Bulk Cargo (Ore) from Dampier. We had discharged the Oil Cargo (ex Ras Tanura) in Iwakuni and commenced a T/C and had to have the vessel 'In all respects ready' on arrival Dampier. I make that point because you paid for mistakes with your job.
Usual configuration for Tank Cleaning. Four B/W machines through the Hatch Covers (2P2S) and Four machines trunked through the TSTks.(2P2S).
On completion of the wash remove the machines from the Hatch covers )keep the outer TSTk machines operating (keeps the temp up). When machines from Hatch Covers are clear stop washing with outer machines. Bring vessel around so she has wind across the ship and open the Hatches (thoughts of Venturi, Bernoulli for the academically inclined)

Hey Presto you are Gas Free in five minutes.
We might have to use the Wilden slurry pumps to assist with cleaning out the wells.
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  #25  
Old 21st July 2008, 11:38
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I recall Meco (Mining Engineeering Co.) fume extraction tank fans being used (the 60's?) on many Shell Tankers (UK) ships. Had a suspicion they were taken from use because of the possibility of sparking - am I remembering correctly? (assuming there are some Joe Shell folk out there today).

Mike

Last edited by mikeg : 21st July 2008 at 15:37.
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