Heaving To query - Ships Nostalgia
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  #1  
Old 21st May 2015, 15:13
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Heaving To query

One of our Radio Officer's Association members has submitted a short article in which he describes a ship he was on heaving to in a Typhoon. As far as he can remember they lowered both anchors down but did not let them go right out but used them to provide a braking effect. I have looked through several manuals and not seen anything suggesting such a procedure. Hence coming to the professionals for advice! Thank you, Cheers, Roger
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Old 21st May 2015, 15:24
frangio frangio is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Bentley View Post
One of our Radio Officer's Association members has submitted a short article in which he describes a ship he was on heaving to in a Typhoon. As far as he can remember they lowered both anchors down but did not let them go right out but used them to provide a braking effect. I have looked through several manuals and not seen anything suggesting such a procedure. Hence coming to the professionals for advice! Thank you, Cheers, Roger
Only thing I can think of is a Sea Anchor - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_anchor

Used one on an exercise with a ship's lifeboat and never heard of them being used for ships but was only at sea a couple of years.
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  #3  
Old 21st May 2015, 16:43
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Frangio, Yes, I agree. I have looked at the sea anchor method you have indicated and seen it described in seamanship manuals, but doubt if this could be used in a Typhoon. Was on ships that had to heave to on two occasions during my time at sea but never saw use of the anchors as described by our contributor. Thanks for replying. Regards, Roger
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  #4  
Old 21st May 2015, 21:09
Ken Wood Ken Wood is offline  
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Never actually heard of such a procedure, but it it would make sense to use any means possible to cause drag, especially to keep head to wind. My only concern would be sending anyone for'd in typhoon conditions.
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Old 21st May 2015, 21:14
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Originally Posted by Ken Wood View Post
Never actually heard of such a procedure, but it it would make sense to use any means possible to cause drag, especially to keep head to wind. My only concern would be sending anyone for'd in typhoon conditions.
Ken, That seems to be what this chap was suggesting happened, but agree it would be a bit dicey going for'd. The ship was a trooper. So might have been higher out of the water than average cargo vessel foc'sle. Thank you for the reply. regards, Roger
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  #6  
Old 21st May 2015, 21:38
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You walk your anchors right out in deep water and you may have a job getting them back.

I've been on ships with small 'wave oil' tanks in the focsle plumbed into the hawse pipes so that you could spread oil on the water to lessen the sea...
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  #7  
Old 21st May 2015, 22:08
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Must admit that I have never heard of that and as Cisco states you might have a problem heaving them home.
Many years ago on passage across the North sea one of the anchors let go unknowingly to us on the bridge as it was bad weather.
We were puzzled as to why we were going so slow.
When the weather moderated we found out why and when we brought the anchor home it was polished like a new sixpence!!!!
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  #8  
Old 22nd May 2015, 01:15
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Whilst I have never heard of it either in our day we would have had a decent warning so preparation time would have been available and no need to put the crowd fwd once the storm was upon her.
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Old 22nd May 2015, 04:29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Bentley View Post
One of our Radio Officer's Association members has submitted a short article in which he describes a ship he was on heaving to in a Typhoon. As far as he can remember they lowered both anchors down but did not let them go right out but used them to provide a braking effect. I have looked through several manuals and not seen anything suggesting such a procedure. Hence coming to the professionals for advice! Thank you, Cheers, Roger
I've never heard of the procedure either but in addition to the other problems mentioned here I think one would need divers to unravel the twisted cable before being able to retrieve them.

I would also worry about the damage I could do to the bow section and forward deck machinery by lowering anchors at sea in such conditions.
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  #10  
Old 22nd May 2015, 05:44
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I have been on a yacht that used a drouge type sea anchor to hold the boat into the wind and waves but never thought that such devices would be suitable for ocean going merchant ships.
Checking the subject on Google ,I see that a company called Coppins make sea anchors of the para drouge type and other styles for any size vessels , the bigger the better in their words.
Surely hanging the ship's ground anchors out of the hawsepipes into the sea during heavy weather to any extent would be akin to doing French knitting in the dark.

Bob
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  #11  
Old 22nd May 2015, 06:27
Robert Hilton Robert Hilton is offline  
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Maybe the original intention was to anchor, if the depth was suitable. Letting her drag would make sense if there was plenty of sea room astern. A rare situation.
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  #12  
Old 22nd May 2015, 06:35
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The times I have heaved to, especially on Trawlers, we used to put her nose into it and ride it out.
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  #13  
Old 22nd May 2015, 07:12
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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# 12

Ditto in station-keeping pilot cutters.

When appropriate, we would also simply lie a-hull, often in dreadful conditions.

End-on at dead-slow ahead must surely be the best option?
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  #14  
Old 22nd May 2015, 14:18
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Thank you everyone who has provided such professional answers. I will change that part of the article to avoid possible embarrassment to the writer. The incident described happened over 60 years ago. Like me the author is past the 80 mark! Best wishes, Roger
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  #15  
Old 22nd May 2015, 14:21
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Quote:
You walk your anchors right out in deep water and you may have a job getting them back.
I can vouch for that, well on a yacht at any rate

Did get it back but was worried for a bit.
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  #16  
Old 22nd May 2015, 16:53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cisco View Post
You walk your anchors right out in deep water and you may have a job getting them back.

I've been on ships with small 'wave oil' tanks in the focsle plumbed into the hawse pipes so that you could spread oil on the water to lessen the sea...
I thought that the windlass was fitted to be of such power as to retrieve the anchor and attached chain's total length if lowered out to it's maximum scope and this as a save working load and not a maximum weight.
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  #17  
Old 22nd May 2015, 17:08
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We were in bad weather in the channel on a coaster with no power and ordered to lower anchor to slow the drift. eventually the tug Meecham assisted with an engine part. I only post this as it may be feasible as a last resort that a large vessel may do this when there is a possibility of running aground.
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  #18  
Old 22nd May 2015, 18:31
Barrie Youde Barrie Youde is offline  
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#17

Hi, Canadian,

Most of us understand heaving-to and being without power as two very different states of existence. To heave-to is a tactical and intentional manoeuvre. To be without-power is unintended; and calls for very different tactics for survival.
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  #19  
Old 22nd May 2015, 19:49
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I did not imply the large vessel was without power. just trying to help the questioner.
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  #20  
Old 23rd May 2015, 00:41
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re: "it may be feasible as a last resort that a large vessel may do this when there is a possibility of running aground."

Attached:
2009-PashaBulkerAnchors.jpg (32.0 KB)
2009-PashaBulkerAnchors1.jpg (34.5 KB)

My memory tells me that the Pasha Bulker crew were criticized for NOT dropping her anchors before being driven ashore?

These particular pictures were taken at the time to show both anchors stowed. I do not recall where I got these pictures? It may have been here on SN?

I seem to recall some here on SN saying that 'if you were going to go aground you better have both anchors down'?

Greg Hayden
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Attached Images
File Type: jpg 2009-PashaBulkerAnchors.jpg (32.0 KB, 46 views)
File Type: jpg 2009-PashaBulkerAnchors1.jpg (34.5 KB, 49 views)
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  #21  
Old 23rd May 2015, 03:49
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Greg, I recall the Pasha Bulker going aground on Nobby's Beach Newcastle Australia in 2007 while I was living in Queensland

Bob
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  #22  
Old 23rd May 2015, 07:22
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I have never seen or heard of this method being performed but do remember clearly, in nautical college many years ago, (probably for masters), a lecturer explaining this method as one of many options available to a master in extreme conditions as a type of sea anchor when hove to, to lessen drift. Bruce.
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  #23  
Old 23rd May 2015, 10:45
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Again my thanks for the latest comments on the question I posed. Regards, Roger
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  #24  
Old 23rd May 2015, 11:24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joebuckham View Post
I thought that the windlass was fitted to be of such power as to retrieve the anchor and attached chain's total length if lowered out to it's maximum scope and this as a save working load and not a maximum weight.
Is this anything to do with the "Equipment Number" - never quite grasped this piece of maritime esoterica.
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  #25  
Old 23rd May 2015, 15:23
janmike janmike is offline  
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janmike

I spent many liner trips between Borneo and Japan with the average rate of 30 storms a season. So I encountered many a storm. Anchors would never be used at deep sea on account of the cables and anchors swinging about and holing the stem. If one had lost the use of the engines then the book theory is to secure a coil of mooring rope to another length of mooring rope and use that as a sea anchor. You have to look that up in a very old seamanship manual

Regards Mike
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