Did the Merch change your taste - Ships Nostalgia
23:09

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

Did the Merch change your taste

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 7th August 2008, 22:55
degsy degsy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,632
Did the Merch change your taste

Reading through these threads on feeding, makes me think back to when I was a "picky eater" as me Mam used to say. Would not eat curries or Chinese grub, fish made me baulk an the thought of prawns made me go green. When she put the Sunday dinner out mine was the one with no gravy. Then I went to sea and as me Dad used to say when I came back " you would eat your way down a jigger full of s*** come back and lick the walls" he had a way with words I think it was the Irish in him. In me cupboard in me flat I have got all kinds of chilli sauces and spices. And like nothing more than trying out recipes from all over the world. My latest was Lamb Tagine from North Africa. I put it down to the Merchant Navy experience. As it was once put to me by a Chief Grocer "Its there son eat it or starve" that was at a Palm Oil Chop supper on an E. D. I did'nt starve and as long as its dead I will eat it. Another thank you to the Grocers an Cooks of the M. N.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 8th August 2008, 11:44
Pat Kennedy's Avatar
Pat Kennedy Pat Kennedy is online now  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 8,549
One meal I had never tasted before I went to sea was liver and bacon, because my mother hated liver and wouldnt have it in the house. I tried it, very dubiously, because I was starving hungry, and I loved it! I have eaten at least once a month for the last fifty years.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 8th August 2008, 11:53
pete's Avatar
pete pete is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
My location
Posts: 936
Curry, used to hate it now can't get enough of it...................pete
__________________
Liz, Where are my Glasses??
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 8th August 2008, 12:07
paisleymerchant's Avatar
paisleymerchant paisleymerchant is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Hotels / Catering
Active: 1975 - 1991
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 1,006
I am the same it was Curries for me in fact before i went to see i would not even put pepper on me dinner !
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 8th August 2008, 14:18
Chris Isaac's Avatar
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1962 - 1980
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
My location
Posts: 3,039
And we all developed an educated palette for all manner of things from all over the world: food, beer, wine, ladies etc etc etc Many things that we would never had tried had we stayed at home with our mothers watching !
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 8th August 2008, 21:46
eldersuk's Avatar
eldersuk eldersuk is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1957 - 1990
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
My location
Posts: 1,498
Degsy's post reminds me of my first trip to sea in ED's. The grocer's usual practice was to put on Palm Oil Chop at lunchtime on the first Sunday after arriving Lagos. The tradition was to lubricate and prepare the gullet for the coming assault by imbibing copious quantities of pink gin.

For a first tripper who had never heard of either pink gin or Palm Oil Chop this presented a serious challenge. However, like a lot of other things which cropped up in my strange new life I persisted at it until I got it right, which turned out to be very rewarding indeed.

Derek
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 8th August 2008, 23:44
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,740
basic fare in our house 13 to feed so going to sea was a real education to my palette ive probely trair almost everything now i am in my seventies china boats was the best food for a young lad of 16 tony allen
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 9th August 2008, 03:09
degsy degsy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,632
palm oil chop the effects

Quote:
Originally Posted by eldersuk View Post
Degsy's post reminds me of my first trip to sea in ED's. The grocer's usual practice was to put on Palm Oil Chop at lunchtime on the first Sunday after arriving Lagos. The tradition was to lubricate and prepare the gullet for the coming assault by imbibing copious quantities of pink gin.

For a first tripper who had never heard of either pink gin or Palm Oil Chop this presented a serious challenge. However, like a lot of other things which cropped up in my strange new life I persisted at it until I got it right, which turned out to be very rewarding indeed.

Derek
I sailed with a Chief Eng. name of Evans who loved Palm Oil Chop with all the extras, Gin Chilli's etc etc. Only thing was he suffered from the Duke of Argyles, 1st Leccie went into his office one morning after a Palm Oil/Gin Orgy, Senior Officers only do, came out P***ing himself laughing. He said he could hear Evo crying in his bog as he passed the West African Acid. The Leccie said there where other sound effects apart from Evo's wailing a full trumpet voluntary as the poor man got shut. Certain foreign dishes should be taken in moderation, poor Evo was walking like John Wayne for a couple of days. One blessing was it kept him out of the engine room, there was a rumour going round he asked the Chief Steward to look at the Argyles , I can not report the Grocers response here leave it to your imagination
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 9th August 2008, 22:53
eldersuk's Avatar
eldersuk eldersuk is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1957 - 1990
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
My location
Posts: 1,498
I well remember Roy Evans, from the Mumbles area of Swansea and known as Evans the Engine, or more commonly Evans the Bed!! I'm not surprised he over indulged on the Palm Oil Chop, he did on most things, such as beer and loud operatic music on his tape recorder at 3 o'clock in the morning.
Even though he could be a nuisance, I was sorry to hear he crossed the bar a couple of years ago.

Derek
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 9th August 2008, 23:24
degsy degsy is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,632
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by eldersuk View Post
I well remember Roy Evans, from the Mumbles area of Swansea and known as Evans the Engine, or more commonly Evans the Bed!! I'm not surprised he over indulged on the Palm Oil Chop, he did on most things, such as beer and loud operatic music on his tape recorder at 3 o'clock in the morning.
Even though he could be a nuisance, I was sorry to hear he crossed the bar a couple of years ago.

Derek
Sounds like the man himself. He had his wife with him one trip, she was a real lady. We used to P*** him off in the saloon by emptying the cheese board of Danish Blue and Camembert he used to get a real cob on. The Leckie who heard his wailing was Jack Blackburn, they used to go on the beer together and have some right rows nearly came to blows one night. A very entertaining pair.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 14th August 2008, 19:31
calvin calvin is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 611
got a liking for far east food in the merchant navy chinese japapenese and thai now great favourites and great likinng for sushi and sake like suntory whiskey but alas cant find any importers in north east.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 14th August 2008, 23:29
fredav1 fredav1 is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 27
Regarding curries I tried so many times to like it but never did. All my shipmates said you would like it in it's real home, India. So when I went to Bombay I bought one of these sooper dooper jobbies. Took one mouthful and nearly puked up. What I used to do on curry day was ask for rice only then pour a tin of shakey milk over it and make a rice pud.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 18th August 2008, 18:50
finetune finetune is offline  
Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1969 - 1988
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 45
Sailed with Stevie Clarkes for 16 years and was introduced to tripe&onions.I liked it.Never had it at home though,my mum and later my wife would'nt entertain it.Lucky they were both curry lovers.
George
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 15th October 2011, 09:59
alan ward alan ward is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Purser
Active: 1966 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by degsy View Post
Reading through these threads on feeding, makes me think back to when I was a "picky eater" as me Mam used to say. Would not eat curries or Chinese grub, fish made me baulk an the thought of prawns made me go green. When she put the Sunday dinner out mine was the one with no gravy. Then I went to sea and as me Dad used to say when I came back " you would eat your way down a jigger full of s*** come back and lick the walls" he had a way with words I think it was the Irish in him. In me cupboard in me flat I have got all kinds of chilli sauces and spices. And like nothing more than trying out recipes from all over the world. My latest was Lamb Tagine from North Africa. I put it down to the Merchant Navy experience. As it was once put to me by a Chief Grocer "Its there son eat it or starve" that was at a Palm Oil Chop supper on an E. D. I did'nt starve and as long as its dead I will eat it. Another thank you to the Grocers an Cooks of the M. N.
I echo all that,my conversion started when my Dad and I lived together in the 60`s.He couldn`t cook at all,poor soul, and having to feed not only himself but a picky 13 year old can`t have been easy.By the time I joined ED`s I less so,by the end of a year I`d eat anything,and probably had.My cupboards are the same,a thousand sauces of varying heat.It drives my missus mad,she`ll cook something and I reach for the tabasco!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 15th October 2011, 10:01
alan ward alan ward is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Purser
Active: 1966 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Isaac View Post
And we all developed an educated palette for all manner of things from all over the world: food, beer, wine, ladies etc etc etc Many things that we would never had tried had we stayed at home with our mothers watching !
Hear,hear, a good all-round education in the finer things in life
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 15th October 2011, 12:36
tom roberts tom roberts is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 907
Melon Jam had tins of it to myself when peggy on the British Supremecy 1954 spread on bread made by second cook and baker I think his name was Mc Cabe best baker I ever came across,took most of my life to find it again but now I have it made by a lovely old lady in France, one thing I hated was the sight of a tray of melted brawn with board of trade salad never been able to eat it.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 15th October 2011, 14:54
alan ward alan ward is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Purser
Active: 1966 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom roberts View Post
Melon Jam had tins of it to myself when peggy on the British Supremecy 1954 spread on bread made by second cook and baker I think his name was Mc Cabe best baker I ever came across,took most of my life to find it again but now I have it made by a lovely old lady in France, one thing I hated was the sight of a tray of melted brawn with board of trade salad never been able to eat it.
What memories you lads are awakening;making brawn in the larder on the England when Brian,a Boy Cook who had worked there the previous voyage,poked his head through the hatch`Oh aye brawn eh?minced shite you`ll poison some poor bastard one day`then he ran.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 15th October 2011, 15:44
Satanic Mechanic's Avatar
Satanic Mechanic Satanic Mechanic is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 7,633
Sort of, though it happened before I went to sea.................

My father having been at sea had a taste for just about every type of foreign food especially curry in all forms and "chinee chow" the result being that I was exposed to such food from as early as I can remember, including him famously bringing containers of Bandari curry home whenever a ship with a Bandari appeared in the port. He wasn't a cook himself but he did a mean Nasi Goreng if pushed. A lot of the neighbours, at least the ones who had not been to sea, considered this some sort of child abuse

Me? It gave me a life long love of global food and real curry in particular.
__________________
This message brought to you in a relaxing methylated purple glow for your comfort and enjoyment
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 15th October 2011, 16:17
Charlie_Wood's Avatar
Charlie_Wood Charlie_Wood is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Port Authorities
Department: Pilotage
Active: 1970 - Present
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Satanic Mechanic View Post
Sort of, though it happened before I went to sea.................

My father having been at sea had a taste for just about every type of foreign food especially curry in all forms and "chinee chow" the result being that I was exposed to such food from as early as I can remember, including him famously bringing containers of Bandari curry home whenever a ship with a Bandari appeared in the port. He wasn't a cook himself but he did a mean Nasi Goreng if pushed. A lot of the neighbours, at least the ones who had not been to sea, considered this some sort of child abuse

Me? It gave me a life long love of global food and real curry in particular.
Crikey SM, are you my brother. My (Glaswegian) pa was a BI man and I remember the nasi goring, chinky chow and curries, normally cooked at 2300 on his return from the pub. I still cook one of his specials, Macaroni cheese with tomatoes, hard boiled eggs and corned beef all added in, on a fairly regular basis. God knows where he got that one from though.

As a young uncert 3/O on the Clan Robertson the Mate, Peter Kemp was a very smooth but supercilious fecker who didn't have any other chums to go ashore with so I was always ordered to accompany him. I was never allowed to pick my own food and he went out of his way to order anything I thought I didn't like. A great education and much appreciated with the benefit of hindsight. Mind you I had to know my place, when he said he'd organised transport up the road he used to sit in the cab and I'd be perched on the dunnage he'd just flogged on the back of the lorry.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 15th October 2011, 16:27
Thats another Story Thats another Story is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 3,628
i was brought up on pee whack scouse liver and onions. then to go to far of lands and eat fish head curry sushi stir fry was a real eye opener and Bowell opener
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 15th October 2011, 16:40
NoMoss's Avatar
NoMoss NoMoss is offline   SN Supporter
a.k.a. Ted Sandle
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Radio Officer
Active: 1956 - 1986
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
My location
Posts: 943
I soon lost my pickiness. On one ship that was stored for a shorter trip than we were doing, the porage was full of weevels. Being still in my teens with an appetite to match, I thought ' You are what you eat and those weevels have eaten porage, so they are porage as well,' and down they went.
__________________


Ted (36 in a 75-year-old body)
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 15th October 2011, 16:40
Satanic Mechanic's Avatar
Satanic Mechanic Satanic Mechanic is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 7,633
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredav1 View Post
Regarding curries I tried so many times to like it but never did. All my shipmates said you would like it in it's real home, India. So when I went to Bombay I bought one of these sooper dooper jobbies. Took one mouthful and nearly puked up. What I used to do on curry day was ask for rice only then pour a tin of shakey milk over it and make a rice pud.
I was in Bombay, ok Mumbai, last year. I went into the office where the office boss knows of my curry addiction.

Him: "We heard you were coming, so we have pre ordered the curry, Is Indian Curry ok"

Me: "??????????- just checking - but this is Mumbai?"

Him: "Yes but now we have British Curries here as well - they are very popular"

So there you go


next episode - taking coal to Newcastle
__________________
This message brought to you in a relaxing methylated purple glow for your comfort and enjoyment
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 15th October 2011, 21:13
Donald McGhee's Avatar
Donald McGhee Donald McGhee is online now  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1964 - 1970
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
My location
Posts: 741
Having spent my first 5 years in Nigeria I was well used to exotic food and was really pleased to sample "new" dishes like mince and tatties, stovies, liver and bacon and fish and chips when I returned to live with my Grandparents for three years. Bit of an **** about face process for me.

Going to sea opened up a whole new box of food that was alternately altered either beyond recognition to its detriment, or turned into something approaching heaven, dependent on the cook!

Bank Line curries still can't be beat and the pepper soups, palm oil chops and groundnut stews are still some of my favourite tucker (make 'em meself). No wonder I am almost spherical!
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 15th October 2011, 22:01
GeeM GeeM is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 82
I spent my Engineer Cadetship with Turnbulls at Poplar Tech between 79 and 83When I first arrived the sight of people eating jellied eels In the East End Pubs nearly turned my stomach . By the time I finished 3rd Phase I was putting them away with everybody else.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 16th October 2011, 10:56
alan ward alan ward is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Purser
Active: 1966 - 1976
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeeM View Post
I spent my Engineer Cadetship with Turnbulls at Poplar Tech between 79 and 83When I first arrived the sight of people eating jellied eels In the East End Pubs nearly turned my stomach . By the time I finished 3rd Phase I was putting them away with everybody else.
If ever you fancy some of them again,look up a firm called Eels on Wheels and they`ll deliver them to you
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When and why did Shell change their funnel colours? clydesiderman Ship Research 10 28th October 2008 21:20
Propeller Change thompson1951 Ship Research 7 15th June 2006 16:02
Did Call-signs Change? John Leary The Radio Room 24 25th May 2006 13:39



Search the net with ask.com
Support SN
Ask.com and get


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.