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  #1  
Old 29th June 2005, 15:14
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Elmbank

Pictured 1935 ish
Handed over to Bank Line 23/4/25
Torpedoed and lost 21/9/40 in North Atlantic
One of some 18 Sister Ships out of H & W Govan
Sorry Ron and Julian, have done my best at enhancing but if you would like the Original copy, I,d be only to pleased to send it to you..............pete
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Old 29th June 2005, 15:15
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Blew it. Sorry. How do I get the Picture to upload??...pete
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  #3  
Old 29th June 2005, 20:19
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Thanks Dave, you're right......Worked first time but obviously without the blurb........thanks for that...........pete
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  #4  
Old 25th July 2013, 17:11
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old Elmbank

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Thanks Dave, you're right......Worked first time but obviously without the blurb........thanks for that...........pete
Could this be the one - Cape Town view
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  #5  
Old 25th July 2013, 22:27
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Oh the memories!
She is the splitting image of the Clydebank,on which I spent two happy years as senior app with Wilkie Rutherford as mate and capt. Holland as master.
The crew lived forward and the two huts on the foredeck were the crew galleys,twas on that ship that we apps had the daily task of going to the aft peak and pumping up fresh water into 5 gall drums and carrying forward to fill up the tanks in the officers and masters bathroom,we had washbasins in the cabin but not connected.Still 2 years on the far east run ,it was heaven.

jim
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  #6  
Old 25th July 2013, 23:37
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Is a cracking photo and the portholes in the hut must have been the cabins too then Jim?
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  #7  
Old 26th July 2013, 15:34
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Originally Posted by John Dryden View Post
Is a cracking photo and the portholes in the hut must have been the cabins too then Jim?
On the Clydebank the crew toilets were on the port side and if you look you will see the familiar cascade down the boot topping. The Bhandaris with their coal fired galleys were on the Starboard side. One got a pong of curry and rancid ghee on one Bridge Wing and the distinctive smell of crew ablutions on the other.
The crew lived in the Forecastle and it was an interesting sight on Sundays when they were made to take every single item of gear out and stow it on No I hatch as the Master made his inspection.
If I remember the Engine and Deck Serangs had their own cabin and the Chippy too. The Butler lived midships across the alleyway from the Apps.
Happy days on Clydebank with no radar no autohelm no running water and often on one engine. I will never forget the sight of those ag wallahs grinding valves on the gratings at the top of the Engine Room in the heat and haze of exhaust fumes.
JC
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  #8  
Old 26th July 2013, 19:03
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Clydebank

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Originally Posted by John Campbell View Post
On the Clydebank the crew toilets were on the port side and if you look you will see the familiar cascade down the boot topping. The Bhandaris with their coal fired galleys were on the Starboard side. One got a pong of curry and rancid ghee on one Bridge Wing and the distinctive smell of crew ablutions on the other.
The crew lived in the Forecastle and it was an interesting sight on Sundays when they were made to take every single item of gear out and stow it on No I hatch as the Master made his inspection.
If I remember the Engine and Deck Serangs had their own cabin and the Chippy too. The Butler lived midships across the alleyway from the Apps.
Happy days on Clydebank with no radar no autohelm no running water and often on one engine. I will never forget the sight of those ag wallahs grinding valves on the gratings at the top of the Engine Room in the heat and haze of exhaust fumes.
JC
Here she is courtesy of Photoship. One of the Bank Line old ' work horses' in my mind.
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  #9  
Old 28th July 2013, 22:56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Campbell View Post
On the Clydebank the crew toilets were on the port side and if you look you will see the familiar cascade down the boot topping. The Bhandaris with their coal fired galleys were on the Starboard side. One got a pong of curry and rancid ghee on one Bridge Wing and the distinctive smell of crew ablutions on the other.
The crew lived in the Forecastle and it was an interesting sight on Sundays when they were made to take every single item of gear out and stow it on No I hatch as the Master made his inspection.
If I remember the Engine and Deck Serangs had their own cabin and the Chippy too. The Butler lived midships across the alleyway from the Apps.
Happy days on Clydebank with no radar no autohelm no running water and often on one engine. I will never forget the sight of those ag wallahs grinding valves on the gratings at the top of the Engine Room in the heat and haze of exhaust fumes.
JC
me,ories must play tricks,I thought that the galleys were both sides,I distintly remember the chickens getting slaughtered on the port side fwd.on the Eide festival,but it was a long time ago,when were you on the clydebank John?

jim
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  #10  
Old 29th July 2013, 01:07
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Just saying Jim but I guess he was aboard the Elmbank,if not he has good information..what is baffling me(and I,m easily baffled)is no portholes in the forecastle... must have been rough and tough.
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  #11  
Old 29th July 2013, 09:07
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Originally Posted by jimthehat View Post
me,ories must play tricks,I thought that the galleys were both sides,I distintly remember the chickens getting slaughtered on the port side fwd.on the Eide festival,but it was a long time ago,when were you on the clydebank John?

jim
I joined Clydebank in Hull on July 1954 and paid off in Port Sunlight Birkenhead on March 1955. Jim.
I remember the heads were on the port side as we had an alcoholic Ch. Off who did his one and only trip with Bank Line with us. He was always desperate for money for booze and flogged anything he could get his hands on. There was a store room between the two sets of lavatories and ablutions - there was no piped water all had to be carried in old paint drums etc. This store was not big but the mate (thinking of beer money) decided to cram it full of empty paint tins and we were ordered to pack as many in as we could - this we did and when we shut the door they all fell down making the heavy teak door impossible to open more than a few inches. What a laugh - we signed off and I wonder who had the misfortune to break in there -- if they ever did.
The Master was Captain Hale - he hated the Mate and gave him a Double DR if I remember. The Mate got Hale really mad when we had Christmas Day in Rabaul. The Mate set off one of those fumigation smoke bombs in the saloon . There was a skylight right under the old man's forward port holes and the smoke rose up and entered there. Hale thought the ship was on fire and most of the officers were all sleeping off a boozy Christmas lunch and were hard to arouse despite Hales exhortations etc. When he eventually found the cause he was beside himself with rage.
There was a lazarette store down aft in the steering flat where there was a Mate's locker containing everything from beeswax, marline spikes, new paintbrushes, hand cuffs , spun yarn and all sorts of chandlery . The mate decided to flog off a lot of this gear to a fellow alcoholic Aussie stevedore in Rabaul and Hale found out.
I liked my time on the Clydebank and only did the short trip on her but it was full of adventure.
I remember she just had the one telegraph on the Bridge. One handle for the port Eng and the other the Starboard one. Going up the Mississippi was an experience as the pilots used the engines to their max with them being blast injection and slow to start . It was hard going keeping the movement book up to date and swinging these handles.
From Hull we went down the Channel and across the Atlantic on one engine. The poor Engineers were exhausted
That's all for now Jim
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  #12  
Old 29th July 2013, 23:32
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just checked my discharge book and I joined the Clydebank in Keil on the 4/4/55 and left in Durban on the 6/8/56 and joined the eastbank on the 7/8/56 as acting third mate for the voyage home.

I remember we caught the harwich /hook ferry and then trained up to Keil.

jim
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  #13  
Old 30th July 2013, 01:34
Hamish Mackintosh Hamish Mackintosh is online now  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Campbell View Post
I joined Clydebank in Hull on July 1954 and paid off in Port Sunlight Birkenhead on March 1955. Jim.
I remember the heads were on the port side as we had an alcoholic Ch. Off who did his one and only trip with Bank Line with us. He was always desperate for money for booze and flogged anything he could get his hands on. There was a store room between the two sets of lavatories and ablutions - there was no piped water all had to be carried in old paint drums etc. This store was not big but the mate (thinking of beer money) decided to cram it full of empty paint tins and we were ordered to pack as many in as we could - this we did and when we shut the door they all fell down making the heavy teak door impossible to open more than a few inches. What a laugh - we signed off and I wonder who had the misfortune to break in there -- if they ever did.
The Master was Captain Hale - he hated the Mate and gave him a Double DR if I remember. The Mate got Hale really mad when we had Christmas Day in Rabaul. The Mate set off one of those fumigation smoke bombs in the saloon . There was a skylight right under the old man's forward port holes and the smoke rose up and entered there. Hale thought the ship was on fire and most of the officers were all sleeping off a boozy Christmas lunch and were hard to arouse despite Hales exhortations etc. When he eventually found the cause he was beside himself with rage.
There was a lazarette store down aft in the steering flat where there was a Mate's locker containing everything from beeswax, marline spikes, new paintbrushes, hand cuffs , spun yarn and all sorts of chandlery . The mate decided to flog off a lot of this gear to a fellow alcoholic Aussie stevedore in Rabaul and Hale found out.
I liked my time on the Clydebank and only did the short trip on her but it was full of adventure.
I remember she just had the one telegraph on the Bridge. One handle for the port Eng and the other the Starboard one. Going up the Mississippi was an experience as the pilots used the engines to their max with them being blast injection and slow to start . It was hard going keeping the movement book up to date and swinging these handles.
From Hull we went down the Channel and across the Atlantic on one engine. The poor Engineers were exhausted
That's all for now Jim
Capt' Freddy Hale was master of the Ivybank circa 50/51,great chap wonder what he did wrong to land that old tub?
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  #14  
Old 31st July 2013, 09:24
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Ivybank

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Originally Posted by Hamish Mackintosh View Post
Capt' Freddy Hale was master of the Ivybank circa 50/51,great chap wonder what he did wrong to land that old tub?
Hallo Hamish,

I know what you mean, but as a member of the Liberty Ship fan club, should point out that the ' Ivybank' in 50/51 was only a few years old. Here she is in all her splendour, with the trademark t'gallant mast proud.
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  #15  
Old 31st July 2013, 09:30
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I wonder how many of the Samboats still had the gun platforms up on the monkey island like the good old maplebank.
jim
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Old 31st July 2013, 11:30
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gun platforms

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Originally Posted by jimthehat View Post
I wonder how many of the Samboats still had the gun platforms up on the monkey island like the good old maplebank.
jim
Hallo Jim

Possibly the removal of the two gun platforms on the upper deck would have meant serious surgery, so they were left. Can recall being in a strong gale in Cook Strait N.Z. and standing in the port side gun bay of the Maplebank when it was vibrating from the wind caught underneath. 'Strumming' would be a better word.
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  #17  
Old 31st July 2013, 15:18
Hamish Mackintosh Hamish Mackintosh is online now  
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They were removed on the Ivybank, but the "arm chair" gun platform can be clearly seen on the fordeck in that picture of her, which seems to have been removed from the others
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Old 31st July 2013, 16:11
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I wonder how many of the Samboats still had the gun platforms up on the monkey island like the good old maplebank.
jim
In order that guns could be "re" fitted if the Cold War went Hot.
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Old 31st July 2013, 22:57
Aberdonian Aberdonian is offline  
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Monkey Island Armament

The deck of the monkey island on the Liberty ship Tielbank had the footprint remaining of what was said to be a steam-powered weapon capable of projecting a type of Mills bomb, or so I was told by the Mate. This unlikely-sounding armament was deemed unreliable, according to his account.

An online search for any reference to this kind of weapon came to nothing so I still wonder about it.

Keith

Last edited by Aberdonian : 31st July 2013 at 23:03.
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  #20  
Old 31st July 2013, 23:07
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You are talking about a Holman Projector, Aberdonian I think?

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Old 1st August 2013, 09:24
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Holman Projector

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You are talking about a Holman Projector, Aberdonian I think?

Regards
Hugh
You have set the bells ringing, Hugh. An online account of the weapon tallies in with the Mate’s description; even the name of the armament now sounds familiar to me.

Although inaccurate, the large cloud of black smoke caused by an explosion scared off enemy pilots who believed they were encountering a much more formidable weapon. Amusing, too, is the story of a first demonstration in front of Churchill when lunchtime bottles of beer were fired off in place of overlooked ammunition.

According to Wiki, 4,500 Holman Projectors were produced during the Second War, some being used to fire grapnels in commando assaults.

Keith
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Old 3rd August 2013, 20:24
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Hello Keith,

Not a popular weapon by all accounts.

From DEMS by Max Reid.
Holman Projector

This was a device which had to be seen to be believed. It used steam, direct from the ship’s boilers or compressed air from a nearby tank,to hurl a tin about the size of a soup tin into the air. Into this tin, one placed a Mk 36 Hand Grenade (Mills Bomb), making sure that the arming device was inside the can, the grenade pin was now pulled, the arming device being held in place by the sides of the can. To launch, you merely dropped the tin into the barrel, when it hit the bottom, steam or air pressure propelled the can out the tube into the path of the oncoming aircraft. The air resistance would pull the can from the grenade thereby releasing the firing mechanism; about three seconds later, the grenade was supposed to explode in front of the aircraft. Of course, by this time the frightened gunner had rolled under a sand bag enclosure to escape the hail of shrapnel which invariably sprayed the ship’s deck. It was a “desperation weapon” to say the least, and fortunately did not survive the entire war. The fear in a late teenager who had to fire this weapon was overwhelming to say the least.

See drawing below from my copy of the DEMS pocket book.

Regards
Hugh
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  #23  
Old 4th August 2013, 14:35
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Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Hallo Hamish,

I know what you mean, but as a member of the Liberty Ship fan club, should point out that the ' Ivybank' in 50/51 was only a few years old. Here she is in all her splendour, with the trademark t'gallant mast proud.
They do say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder Alan, but your thumbnail of the Ivybank sure looks as though she was an ugly duckling
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Old 4th August 2013, 18:10
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Liberty Ship appeal

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Originally Posted by ccurtis1 View Post
They do say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder Alan, but your thumbnail of the Ivybank sure looks as though she was an ugly duckling
Not the best photo of a liberty, so can agree with you. They had a rather bluff bow. As a class though, they surely had a stately appearance, especially when loaded. See the sister ship Ericbank here, looking quite handsome ( In my opinion!)
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  #25  
Old 4th August 2013, 20:34
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Originally Posted by Alan Rawlinson View Post
Not the best photo of a liberty, so can agree with you. They had a rather bluff bow. As a class though, they surely had a stately appearance, especially when loaded. See the sister ship Ericbank here, looking quite handsome ( In my opinion!)
I quite agree Alan. I have a photograph of the Avonmoor taken in Buenos Aires sometime between September 1943 and December 1944 in which my dad sailed, and she looks so similar. Seeing how I was born in May 1944, he must have left my mother with a going away present.
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