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Somalia's pirates - Merged Threads

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  #1  
Old 21st March 2006, 17:12
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Somalia's pirates - Merged Threads

If anyone is interested I am on a 'Flotell' (accommodation rig) being towed from Singapore to Mexico via the Suez Canal. We are being towed by the tug
'Wolraad Woltemade' and are averaging a speed of approx. 6.0 knots. We expect to arrive in Mexico around 25th.May, a total voyage of three months. There was some concern about 'Pirates' as we approached the Somali coast and we went into (still are) M****C LEVEL 2 security plan. I'm not fully convinced that fire hoses will stop grenade launchers but there you go. It was a relief when the nuclear powered aircraft carrier 'Charles De Gaulle' came close by and escorted us "through the gap" and now we are in the Red Sea things seem to be a lot more relaxed. Incidentally the carrier told us that out of a crew of 2,000. 600 are air crew, I find that amazing. Anyway we plod on.
Cheers
Ray
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Old 21st March 2006, 17:43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayJordandpo
If anyone is interested I am on a 'Flotell' (accommodation rig) being towed from Singapore to Mexico via the Suez Canal. We are being towed by the tug
'Wolraad Woltemade' and are averaging a speed of approx. 6.0 knots. We expect to arrive in Mexico around 25th.May, a total voyage of three months. There was some concern about 'Pirates' as we approached the Somali coast and we went into (still are) M****C LEVEL 2 security plan. I'm not fully convinced that fire hoses will stop grenade launchers but there you go. It was a relief when the nuclear powered aircraft carrier 'Charles De Gaulle' came close by and escorted us "through the gap" and now we are in the Red Sea things seem to be a lot more relaxed. Incidentally the carrier told us that out of a crew of 2,000. 600 are air crew, I find that amazing. Anyway we plod on.
Cheers
Ray
Ray
Will probally see you there Im off to the Gulf of Mexico on April 14th to join the Atlantis/Balder Project might get a few cervezas with you.
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Old 21st March 2006, 18:09
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See you there

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdynia
Ray
Will probally see you there Im off to the Gulf of Mexico on April 14th to join the Atlantis/Balder Project might get a few cervezas with you.
Will keep ane eye out for you. A few "Coronas" will go down a treat.
Ray
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Old 22nd March 2006, 07:02
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"Me Perdona me perdona. Pero yo tomo Corona!"
"Corona una cervesa mas fina!"

This used to pump out of Guadalajara (Mexico) shortwave mariachi radio station I listened to crossing the Pacific in the early sixties.
Always wondered what it tasted like and now you can buy it almost anywhere just like San Mig...
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Old 22nd March 2006, 07:09
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Hey Ray, Have a few Cuba Libre for me when you hit Mexico, or even Bacardi & Kaluah. Have a safe trip, too! Vix
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Old 17th July 2006, 09:27
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Somalia's pirates - Merged Threads

From Macon.com -

20 Filipino seamen freed by pirates

MANILA, Philippines - About 20 Filipino seamen kidnapped by pirates in Somalia in March have been released and are on their way home, officials said Monday.

The men were freed Saturday, and it was not clear whether any ransom has been paid, said Roy Cimatu, the government's special envoy to the Middle East.

The men were seized after their oil tanker, the United Arab Emirates-registered MT LIN1, offloaded its cargo at a southern Somali port on March 29, the Philippine Foreign Affairs Department said.

Cimatu said the owners of the ship, who were not identified, negotiated for the release of the men. No other details were provided.

Piracy in Somalia rose sharply last year, with the number of reported incidents at 35, compared with two in 2004, according to the International Maritime Bureau. The bandits target both passenger and cargo vessels for ransom or loot.


Rushie
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Old 17th July 2006, 18:29
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There was a program on TV last night 3 hrs long,all about the problem of Pirates. It showed the Chinese soldiers shooting the ones they caught in the head after the trial. They had shot the crew of one ship and stole the ship. What they like to do now is take the captain and the chief engineer hostage and hold them for ransom,so far they are getting the shipping company paying the money to the pirates in less than three days,not saying how much they paid.
John
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Old 18th July 2006, 08:58
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Pirates

The Chinese don't mess about, do they?
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Old 7th August 2006, 07:53
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More piracy....

From the BBC -

Trawler safe after pirate ordeal

Crew members will receive health checks before flying home
A South Korean fishing boat with 25 crew members seized by pirates off Somalia in April has arrived in Kenya.
The Dongwon-ho 628 was released after the alleged payment of a ransom of several hundred thousand dollars.

Wearing tattered clothes, the sailors were greeted with cheers from diplomats and journalists as they disembarked in the Kenyan port of Mombasa.

The men - from South Korea, Indonesia, Vietnam and China - are to be given health checks before being flown home.

'Compensation'

The trawler was fishing with two other South Korean boats in international waters when speedboats landed attackers on board.

"We were not tortured but there was a lot of tension as the rescue mission continued," Vietnamese sailor Nguyen Xuan Qua told Reuters news agency.


The ship was released by the pirates after three months

"We did not know when we were going home. All our lives hung in the balance."

The Indonesian, Chinese and South Korean ambassadors to Kenya welcomed the crew in Mombasa, Reuters reports.

"We want to ensure that their rights are taken care of and that they will be compensated by the company they work for," the Chinese envoy said.

Hijackings and piracy have been frequent off the Somali coastline, with maritime gangs demanding ransoms for the safe release of crew.

The area became one of the most dangerous in the world for piracy after warlords ousted Somalia's former ruler in 1991 and divided the country among themselves.

However incidents of piracy are said to have lessened since the Islamic Courts Union militia imposed more control over the south of the country since June.


Rushie
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  #10  
Old 1st November 2006, 15:38
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Somalia's pirates - Merged Threads

From the BBC -

Ten Somalis have been sentenced to seven years in jail for piracy and hijacking by a Kenyan court.
The men were arrested earlier this year by the US Navy which responded to a reported hijack off the Somali coast.

The pirates had maintained they were fisherman and had not held 16 crew members of an Indian ship for ransom.

Somalia's coastline is one of the world's worst areas for piracy, but incidents have declined since the Islamic courts rose to power in June.

Somalia has been in the grip of warlords and militias for years and has not had a functioning national government since 1991.

The Union of Islamic Courts (UIC) has consolidated its control over much of southern Somalia after seizing the capital, Mogadishu.

The UIC was set up by businessmen who wanted to impose law and order, and their gunmen have become Somalia's strongest fighting force

The decline in piracy has also been attributed to foreign navy patrols.

When the case opened in the Kenyan port city of Mombasa in February the suspects said they were fishermen and did not know why they had been "abducted" from their fishing boat.

But Indian sailors identified the men, who were caught by the US Navy in international waters, and said they had been tortured by them.

The rescued Indian vessel was brought to Mombasa because it was the nearest port.


Expect them in the UK at anytime then...?

Rushie
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  #11  
Old 1st November 2006, 20:23
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It is now 7 years since Tony Blair downgraded piracy from being a capital offence. Of course, he was under pressure from the EU to remove the death sentence entirely from UK law and piracy, along with setting fire to HM Dockyards, treason and mutiny all fell foul of the PC sword. However, this sent entirely the wrong message to the pirates.

It's taken many years of fighting by piracy victims such as myself, to get Western Navies interested in taking on the pirates particularly when this involves "hot pursuit" whereby a foreign warship enters the terrritorial waters of another country to capture pirates. Now the US Navy has gone to the trouble of capturing pirates, for the Kenyan court to hand down such lenient sentences is disgraceful. In future pirates in Africa will know that even if they are captured by a Western warship while attacking a merchant ship, the courts will effectively let them off.

There is only one answer to this problem and it is one that was used successfully by the Royal Navy operating on the China coast during the 19th Century. Pirates should be fired upon and blown out of the water. Any survivors should be executed. After that the village/town the pirate vessel came from should be shelled and and distroyed.

Pirates are a disease. Killing them is the only way to remove the problem
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Old 1st November 2006, 21:48
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Wow !!!!!
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  #13  
Old 2nd November 2006, 00:59
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Cap'n Pete....very strong forthright comments there.

As a non-seafarer I admire your views and my mind says "yes"....off with their heads..!

Nice one Cap'n..!

Rushie
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Old 2nd November 2006, 06:58
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I have to agree with captain Pete. the penalties for piracy are far too lenient. lets have it as a capital offence and execute them. any threats about shelling the ports they come from would encourage the locals to stamp these guts out as well.
Fair play to you Captain Pete. Having been there you will know far better the situation than any who may dissagree with your comments.
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  #15  
Old 2nd November 2006, 09:23
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As Master I was boarded by pirates in the early 70's before it became newsworthy. I was also assigned to the three IMO piracy task forces that visited Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia in the 90's. The problem is very complex and the only people who can solve it are the Governments of the areas where the pirates have their bases. This will never happen for many reasons.

Our seamans solution of, hang them and then send the gun boats in to the villages that they come from would be an excellent solution & would probably work. Again, it can never happen. Back to the drawing board.
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Old 2nd November 2006, 23:16
Cap'n Pete Cap'n Pete is offline  
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Look John, if the United States can keep merchant seamen locked up for a year and then present them in court in leg irons and chains, just so they can appear as prosecution witnesses in a pollution case against one of their shipmates, then their ability to execute a few pirates off the African coast is not fanciful.

I once visited the family of a British master who'd been murdered by pirates in Indonesian waters in 1992. Perchaps we should ask them and the families of all the other hundreds of merchant seamen who've lost their lives in pirate attacks what the best answer is to eradicating the problem.

Joining a committee is not the answer!
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Old 2nd November 2006, 23:37
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I agree with you Peter. What I am saying is that the people who need to take action are the Gov'ts of Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines & China. They are never going to do this. The only time the U.S will take action is if their interests are getting seriously affected - so it won't happen. The Russians sent warships to the South China Sea a few years ago after some Russian ships were boarded - this only lasted a few months until the threat to the Russians was resolved.
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Old 3rd November 2006, 10:18
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Another Somali hijacking

From Shabelle Media Network -

United Arab Emirates-registered vessel has been seized off coastline of the Somali capital Mogadishu, the MV Fishana vessel is reported charted by Somali businessman.

Somalia Pirates
The Somali businessman charted-vessel was carrying charcoal from El maan port near Mogadishu, Somali capital.

Abdurrahman Olow, prominent Mogadishu-based businessman, who owns the charcoal shipment, told Radio Shabelle Radio that, the captain of the hijacked ship had contacted with him confirming that the ship has been hijacked.

Mr. Abdurrahman said, the hijackers let us speak with the captain of the vessel, who also confirmed that they were taken hostages,
The ship had anchored at Mogadishu international airport loading off food stuff before sailing to Elman port near Mogadishu for loading charcoal to United Arab Emirates.

At least 12 Indian crewmen were on board while the captain is reported to be an Ethiopian national.

According to Mr. Olow the hijackers have taken the ship to 45 miles away from Mogadishu coastlines.

"We donít know who the hijackers were, but we have been told that a group of Somali armed men seized the ship, he told to Radio Shabelle.

It is amazing that to see or hear that the pirates have again resumed their evil operations in Somalia he added.

He said, that he has already informed the authorities of Islamic courts union for the hijack of ship adding that the Islamic courts have pledged to take deceive action against that.

The International Maritime Board has already warned of an alarming increase in piracy in Somali waters and has urged ships to avoid the area.

It is the first time to hijack a ship since the Islamic courts took control of the Somali capital Mogadishu and much of the southern part of Somalia, though more than 40 piracy attack took place before the Islamists came into force.

This move is coincided after 10 Somali pirates sentenced by a Kenyan court for seven years in prison for each in Kenya after convicting that they hijacked an Indian ship.


Rushie
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Old 3rd November 2006, 17:12
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I'm glad we're on the same page John. After the attack on my ship I was invited to see the UK Minister of Shipping. He and his senior civil servants were very well informed of the piracy problem in the Malacca and Singapore Strait. However, as he explained to me "We cannot just send in the gun boats, Old Boy, because we're the former colonial power, don't you see?"

I think it's time the Western powers stopped worrying about upsetting littorial states that refuse to tackle pirates and give their naval forces the ability to shoot on sight.
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Old 3rd November 2006, 18:15
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May I put forward a slightly different point of view--- 7 years is actually a pretty decent sentence, and they WERE convicted. Take into consideration that they will probably serve the full sentence, in atrocious conditions of incarceration, and I think we in the "west" have little to quibble about regarding this sentencing.

NOTHING is ever again going to attract a capital sentence in the "civilised" Western world. In the UK, IF they had been convicted, despite lots of top class representation at the public expense, they would almost certainly have attracted a lower scale of punishment-- perhaps not even imprisonment--- but even if so sentenced, take off time spent on remand from the term of imprisonment imposed, plus the statutory early release, and then the excellent conditions within the prison environment, the number of agencies/ persons involved in attempting rehabilitation.......... and so on ad infinitum

I also doubt that we will revert to the Palmerston theory of gunboat diplomacy---never mind that it is difficult enough for the RN to police the areas it is already involved in (war zones, drugs enforcement,fishing enforcement,civilian evacuations etc etc) never mind trying to be in the right spot at the right time in a vast area of sea.

Just my humble opinion-- in no way condoning piracy, I abhor it as much as the next person.
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Old 3rd November 2006, 18:22
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Cheers John....they hang at dawn.....yip, yap, yahoo...
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Old 4th March 2007, 12:59
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Somalian pirates arrested.

From the BBC -

Four pirates who are part of the gang that have hijacked a United Nations-chartered cargo ship in Somali have been arrested, aid officials say.
The UN said the authorities in Puntland arrested the gunmen when they went to purchase supplies in Bargal port

The hijacked ship, MV Rozen, had just delivered food aid to north-eastern Somalia when pirates seized it.

Piracy was rampant in Somalia but stopped last year when the Union of Islamic Courts (UIC) were in power.

Since the overthrow of the UIC at the turn of the year, Somalia has been descending back into the violence and chaos seen in the previous 16 years, and this latest incident raises fears of a resumption of lawlessness on the seas as well.

'Ordeal'

"The arrest is welcome but the safe release of the crew and the vessel remains our chief concern. We very much hope the ordeal will end soon," Peter Goossens, the UN's World Food Programme Somali country director, said in a statement.

Four pirates are still aboard the hijacked vessel and the fate of the 12 crew is still unknown. The crew is composed of six Kenyans and six Sri Lankans.

Mr Goossens said the ship which had anchored six miles off the coast of Puntland region had started sailing southwards.

Initial reports indicated that the administration in Puntland had started negotiations with the pirates, but the WFP says no demands for ransom has been made.

On Monday, the UN said a US warship was heading towards the Somali coast.

The Rozen had delivered 1,800 tonnes of food aid to the semi-autonomous Puntland region and was returning to its home port of Mombasa in Kenya when it was seized on Sunday.

The Rozen was attacked last year off a port south of Mogadishu, but dodged the pirates that time, the WFP said.

In October, Kenya jailed a group of Somali pirates after they were captured by the by the US Navy off the Somali coast.


Rushie.
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  #23  
Old 5th March 2007, 13:59
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Post US warship monitors pirates (BBC News)

A US warship is heading towards the Somali coast, say UN staff, after pirates hijacked a food aid ship.

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Old 3rd April 2007, 16:10
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Post Somali pirates seize Indian ship (BBC News)

Heavily armed pirates have seized an Indian cargo vessel off the coast of Somalia's capital, maritime officials say.

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  #25  
Old 5th April 2007, 16:31
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Somalia's pirates - Merged Threads

From the China People's Daily -

Pirates who hijacked an Indian-flagged cargo ship as it was preparing to dock at Mogadishu port early this week are demanding a ransom of 20,000 U.S. dollars before releasing the freighter.

Kenya's maritime official said on Thursday the pirates reduced the ransom from 40,000 dollars earlier demanded for the release of MV Nimatullah, which was seized with 14-member crew while delivering 900 tons of cargo off the Somali coast.

"The vessel has been brought to coast off Haradheere, the well- known pirates' nest in central Somalia,"Andrew Mwangura, head of the Kenyan chapter of the Seafarers Assistance Program (SAP) said in a statement.

The freighter whose owner Issa Bhata is based in Dubai was hijacked by pirates armed with assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades in a speedboat in Somali waters on early Monday.

This is the second vessel to be hijacked in the Somali waters in six weeks. The International Maritime Bureau has described the Somali waters as one of the dangerous ones in the world.

"WFP (World Food Programme) and SAP are very concerned with this second hijacking of a vessel in Somali waters within six weeks, as vessel owners will become very reluctant to transport goods to Somali ports because of that,"said Mwangura.

"This will endanger the lifeline of food aid by ocean transport, as WFP plans to transport urgently needed food aid for some 850,000 vulnerable population especially the displaced and women and children, in impoverished and war-torn Somalia,"he said.

"Any disruption in this lifeline will cause immediately hunger among this target group. We appeal for the immediate safe return of the 12 crew members of the MV Rozen and the 14 crew of the MV Nimatullah."

The latest seizure followed the hijacking of a United Nations chartered ship, the Rozen, with its crew of six Kenyans and six Sri Lankans in late February. The vessel had just delivered food aid in northeastern Somalia.

Waters off the unpatrolled 3,700 km Somali coastline saw scores of pirate attacks between March 2005 and June last year, when Islamists seized Mogadishu and then moved into much of southern and central Somalia.

Last month, Kenyan maritime officials monitoring the pirate- infested east African coast said raiders had returned to the Somali settlement of Haradere,about 300 km north of Mogadishu.


Rushie
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