How to Splice a Wire Rope - Ships Nostalgia
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How to Splice a Wire Rope

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  #1  
Old 5th February 2009, 06:24
Arthur Jenner Arthur Jenner is offline
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How to Splice a Wire Rope

HOW TO SPLICE A WIRE ROPE
by AJ
I don't suppose that anyone who reads this article will ever be called upon to actually splice a wire rope, but as we all know, you can never tell when, during some emergency, someone will say, `Is there anyone here who is able to splice this wire rope?' Then you will be able, proudly but modestly, to raise your hand and reply, `Yes, I can. Do you want a long splice, a short splice, an eye splice, or would you like me to put a thimble in the end? The only trouble is that I haven't brought my marlin-spike with me.'
It may be a matter of life and death, or perhaps I should say, lives and deaths, because it could actually come to that you know. That is why you should always carry a marlin-spike. It isn't exactly the ideal tool for carrying in one's trouser pocket though, because, unless the pocket is specially reinforced, the sharp end would most likely pierce the bottom of it, allowing the marlin-spike to fall down your leg and cause a nasty injury to your foot. There other ways to carry it, however, and one of these is, if you happen to be a lady, in your handbag. It will of course make the reticule rather heavy, and may cause the carrying strap to break eventually So if you are a lady, and if you are considering carrying a spike, make sure that you have a heavy duty handbag.
The marlin-spike is a bit awkward for a man to carry, but thanks to the little hole in the blunt end, it can be threaded on to a piece of heavy string or a ropeyarn and either slung across your shoulder or suspended from your belt. Spunyarn could be used instead of string, but it smells a bit of stockholm tar, and some people might not like that very much. Actually I think it's a much nicer smell than either after-shave or garlic, but I suppose not everyone has my kind of nose. They should think themselves very lucky because my nose has got some disadvantages as well. It tends to get blocked up fairly often and it isn't always easy to clear. I expect you are going to say, `Why don't you use your marlin-spike to dig out the bogies or whatever they are', aren't you. Well I don't mind because I'm used to bloody smart Alecs like you, butting in when I'm trying to write a serious article.
I suppose I've wandered away from the subject of wire splicing a bit, but then it is no good trying to teach someone something if you don't give them some idea of the tools that they will have to use. For instance, imagine trying to explain how to make a piece of furniture. `Take a saw and cut a piece off a lump of wood.' The person reading that might wonder what on earth a saw was. He might think it was like a marlin-spike. Imagine trying to cut wood with a marlin-spike.
A marlin-spike may not be much use to you if you want to splice a very large wire and you haven't got a vice. Now I'm not silly enough to suggest that you carry a vice around on your person. If you have a car though, it might be a good idea to carry one of those little portable workbenches in the boot. If there isn't much room in it, you could always leave the spare wheel at home, or if you are too chicken to do that, you could put it in the back seat and leave the kids at home. I don't think that there is going to be much room in this article to describe how to actually perform the splice, because I'm limited by my controller to a certain number of words, so if you want to complain, write to him, not me; and perhaps he'll commission me to write a second instalment.
One final word of warning. If you are a gentleman, and have decided to carry your marlin-spike in your pocket with the blunt end down, be very careful when you put your hand in to get your pipe and matches, because you could impale your wrist on it. It may be advisable to wear one of those wide leather wrist-straps.
(to be continued)
(perhaps)

Last edited by Arthur Jenner : 5th February 2009 at 06:32.
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Old 5th February 2009, 06:32
John Crossland John Crossland is offline
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Old 5th February 2009, 10:59
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Brilliant Arthur.
Mike
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Old 5th February 2009, 11:32
Peter Fielding Peter Fielding is offline  
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Arthur,
When you eventually get round to actually describing how to splice a wire rope, I suspect it may come as something of an anticlimax after this hilarious preamble!
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  #5  
Old 5th February 2009, 12:16
Arthur Jenner Arthur Jenner is offline
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Originally Posted by John Crossland View Post
Yes John. If there is one item that is essential for wire rope splicing, it is a good picture of an 'I' boat, especially if it is to be an 'I' splice.
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Old 5th February 2009, 15:14
Fieldsy Fieldsy is offline
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Originally Posted by Arthur Jenner View Post
HOW TO SPLICE A WIRE ROPE
by AJ
I don't suppose that anyone who reads this article will ever be called upon to actually splice a wire rope...
My time had finally come - asked to splice a wire rope for the first time in my life. 'No problem' sez I - remembering seeing the heading of Arthur's post. Wrestled the ends of a greasy wire into my lounge (where my PC is), withdrew my spike from it's home in my nether regions, and clicked on the link ready to follow the expected guidance.

I've totally lost face with the local Brownie pack and terrified I won't get the grease stains out of the carpet before the missus returns.

Thanks Arthur.
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Old 5th February 2009, 15:28
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I can just imagine what a policeman would have to say to you if you got spotted carrying a marlin spike...
"Now then sir, you say you've got it in case someone needs a wire rope splicing, eh? I think we'll talk about that down at the station"
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  #8  
Old 5th February 2009, 16:02
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Peter Jenner Peter Jenner is offline
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That Knot's funny.
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  #9  
Old 5th February 2009, 16:31
Doug Jenner Doug Jenner is offline  
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No wonder I grew up not knowing how to splice a wire rope. Thanks, Dad!
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Old 5th February 2009, 18:17
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Brilliant Arthur! Hurry up with the next installment.
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Old 5th February 2009, 18:43
Santos Santos is offline  
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Splices - Oh happy days, I was taught as a Cadet to Splice both Rope and wire and with my fellow cadets was often called on to splice eyes in the new mooring ropes and wire springs.

We used to do this in the Cargo sheds ashore before they were loaded onto the ship and whilst we were working by the ships after our leave had ended. We had a little work bench with a vice on it for the steel wire but used to sit inside the mooring rope coils when splicing them.

Chris.
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Old 5th February 2009, 19:25
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No wonder I grew up not knowing how to splice a wire rope. Thanks, Dad!
Another 'Jenner' on the site, welcome Doug. Can we expect more yarns to the standard that Arthur has set?
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  #13  
Old 5th February 2009, 20:27
Arthur Jenner Arthur Jenner is offline
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I think I might have raised the hopes of some of the unfortunate people who read my scribblings. The secret society of ancient sailors has forbidden me to reveal the secrets the actual use of the spike and I am terrified that if I tell any more secrets they will tie marline splikes to my toes and drop me in deepest of the deep 'you know what', so I implore you to ignore my previous instructions and go back to bed.
Any ex AB's of my vintage will obviously be expert in use of the spike and will naturally knock up a Liverpool splice for you at the drop of a hat.
Ta ta for now

Last edited by Arthur Jenner : 5th February 2009 at 20:30.
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Old 5th February 2009, 20:40
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I want to know what Santos's vice was that he kept on a bench. Was it not house trained ? Was it the vice that cannot be mentioned ?

On the other hand, Arthur should be declared a national treasure, or something. What's going on in the hand that isn't occupied by Arthur ?

More please.

Ian
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  #15  
Old 5th February 2009, 21:09
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Glad I am an engineer and the only thing I needed in my pockets were a torch ( flash light for the rest of you ) and a "shifter" ( adjustable wrench for the rest of you )

Would rather clean a purifier ( centrifuge for the rest of you ) than try to splice a wire rope .

Derek
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Old 5th February 2009, 21:58
Santos Santos is offline  
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I want to know what Santos's vice was that he kept on a bench. Was it not house trained ? Was it the vice that cannot be mentioned ?


Ian
All that I can remember Ian is that she was about 5' 4" , blue eyes oops
actually it was painted green

Chris
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  #17  
Old 5th February 2009, 22:20
steve todd steve todd is offline
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How to splice a rope

Brute force and ignorance was what a lampy on the Argentina Star taught me. Year later I was still at it making the 12" dia slings that lifted the Piper Alpha rig jacket out of Cherbourge. I'm the geezer in the hard hat.

Steve Todd

Chateanurf Ropes 2.JPG

Chateanurf Ropes 6.jpg

Chateanurf Ropes 9.JPG
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  #18  
Old 6th February 2009, 09:40
trucker trucker is offline
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heart

once you join the marlin spike to the wire,before parting the wire. before the first tuck.make sure you don,t break the poor wire,s heart.
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Old 6th February 2009, 11:14
Doug Jenner Doug Jenner is offline  
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Another 'Jenner' on the site, welcome Doug. Can we expect more yarns to the standard that Arthur has set?
No, Sister - I'll leave all the yarns to the old man. If you want a newsletter or brochure on the other hand...
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Old 7th February 2009, 12:43
deckboypeggy deckboypeggy is offline  
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splice.wow

Quote:
Originally Posted by steve todd View Post
Brute force and ignorance was what a lampy on the Argentina Star taught me. Year later I was still at it making the 12" dia slings that lifted the Piper Alpha rig jacket out of Cherbourge. I'm the geezer in the hard hat.

Steve Todd

Attachment 12292

Attachment 12293

Attachment 12294
3 very intresting phots. that is splicing that is one claim to fame all of you i bet you never used a serving board.worm and parcel with the lay turn and serve the other way, that has never left me,i would say you are or were riggers on the highest level. we used to cut the heart out..
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Old 12th February 2009, 02:29
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cant wait for the FID to apear???
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Old 12th February 2009, 05:40
Arthur Jenner Arthur Jenner is offline
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The FID may very well appear.

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Originally Posted by jim barnes View Post
cant wait for the FID to apear???
If you are not very careful, I may just do that. I may subject you to the explanation of the necessity of always being in possession of a large FID just in case you are suddenly called upon to put an eye in a very, very large rope.
So just you watch out Jim Barnes
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Old 12th February 2009, 15:25
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another point regarding the splicing of the wire rope and a said vice been necessitated? well by golly by gum and a monkey loose up the for mast! as i remember the wire was lashed to a satisfactory point on the bulk head or even to a water tight door and then it was made ready and usually the chippy or a scary old AB would proceed to teach the deck boy or jos how to proceed and to teach him how to insert the SPIKE(care full how you say that) then after being shown then it was the turn of the D/B or JOS to do it and struggle funny how it looked so simple! ??
Then it was eyes in the Polly ropes and more confusion with eight strands and wait for it another piece of kit a FID, or as the hard knocks said "every finger a spike and every thumb a fid,,,question any good at tying boot laces, been told cant wear rigger boots any more on site. lol
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Old 13th February 2009, 12:25
PollY Anna PollY Anna is offline  
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Hi Jim (Barnes)

The first time I saw a large mooring rope Fid used in earnest was when a Bosun used it to defend himself against 2 drunken Ab's he didn't hit them with it until they stepped over the door sill in to his cabin. No names no pack drill but it was very effective he only hit them twice very neat and effect splice. The size and weight of that very large tool made from Lingnan Vite (the only wood that doesn't float to dense). Later that trip I saw it used for the purpose it was designed for funny enough it was one of the Ab's that it had been on the receiving end which I thought at the time rather a funny little twist all was forgiven when both sobered up. They came back from ashore drunk it didn't happen at sea but tied up in port.

Regards Ron
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Old 13th February 2009, 12:36
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yes a very usefull tool in all sorts of situations, i believe in the days of sail the thole pins (i think thats what they where called) where used to fasten the rigging to the ships gun wales, similar to large FIDS but also part of the Bosuns taking charge kit if you get my gist !!!
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