Twin Screw Glens - Ships Nostalgia
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Twin Screw Glens

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  #1  
Old 4th March 2009, 20:37
steve2 steve2 is offline  
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Twin Screw Glens

The old Twin -screw Glens were built prior to WW11 and reportedly were too speedy to join convoys. I seem to remember that one was converted to an Auxiliary Carrier and also that another one was captured on the stocks in the Nedderlands. This one was convered to an Armed Merchant Raider by the Kriegsmarine. I don't think she ever managed to get out of the Baltic and do any raiding. Anyone know any more about these ships war service?
Steve2
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  #2  
Old 5th March 2009, 09:16
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Tai Pan Tai Pan is offline  
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Glengarry was captured being built and named Hansa by the gerries she had a chequed life as an AMC and depot ship before holts got her back after the war.
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Old 5th March 2009, 09:24
steve2 steve2 is offline  
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Thanks for that John, heard the tales but the old memory plays tricks. Hadn't realised that she was actually captured in Cobenhagen. Those old Glens cetrainly had a loyal following.
Steve2
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  #4  
Old 5th March 2009, 12:49
BillH BillH is offline  
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The following information is taken from an old back up CD I have at work but I believe what I have at home may have some additional info.

GLENROY (3) (1938 - 1966)
O.N. 166256. 9,809g. 5,875n. 483.0 x 66.4 x 31.3 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

15.8.1938: Launched by the Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Ltd., Greenock (Yard No. 571), for Glen Line Ltd., London. 1938: Completed. 10.1939: Requisitioned by the Admiralty at the end of her second voyage. 23.10.1939 until 30.4.1940: Converted into a Fleet Supply Ship. 10.6.1940: Arrived at Liverpool for conversion into an Infantry Assault Ship. 12.9.1940: Damaged by aircraft bombs whilst at Liverpool, requiring further repairs. 24.11.1940: Conversion completed. 2.1941: Sailed into the Mediterranean. 22.4.1941: Grounded at the entrance to Alexandria whilst outward to participate in the evacuation of Greece, and was left behind. Subsequently repaired and on 22 & 26.5.1941: Made two abortive attempts to land reinforcements on Crete being forced to withdraw by intense enemy aircraft actions and returned to Alexandria. 23.11.1941: Departed from Alexandria with supplies for Tobruk and when in a position 31.39N., 26.28E., was at 16:05hrs damaged by a aircraft torpedo. Subsequently her troops transferred to FARNDALE and GLENROY was taken in tow toward Alexandria by CARLISLE. However due to the nature of the damage she was beached at Mersa Matruh to prevent sinking. 26.11.1941: Refloated and 3 days later arrived in tow at Alexandria for repairs which were undertaken between March and November 1942 to make seaworthy for journey to Cardiff for permanent repairs. Early 1943 following repairs was reduced to a care & maintenance basis. 15.10.1943 until 21.2.1944: Converted into an LSI(L) at Belfast. 17.6.1944: Damaged by a mine explosion during the D-Day landings and returned to Cardiff for repair which took from 10.7.1944 until 20.1.1945. 21.6.1946: Declared surplus to naval requirements. 14.8.1946: Handed over to Silly, Cox and Company, Falmouth for restoration to her original profile. 27.5.1948: Returned to Glen Line service. 9.1966: Sold to Ataka and Company Ltd., Japan, for demolition at Onomichi. 29.10.1966: Sailed from Kobe bound to Onomichi but was resold and 2.11.1966: Demolition was commenced at Kure, by Tarumoto Sangyo K. K.


GLENEARN (5) (1938 - 1970)
O.N. 166254. 9,869g. 5,981n. 483.1 x 66.4 x 31.3 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

29.6.1938: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 368), for Glen Line Ltd. 1938: Completed. 15.10.1939: Requisitioned by the Admiralty at the end of her second voyage for conversion into a Fleet Supply Ship, by Palmer's at Hebburn. This took from 22.10.1939 until 25.4.1940. 6.5.1940: Returned to commercial trade. 2.7. 1940: Arrived at Liverpool for conversion into an Infantry Assault Ship. 13.12.1940: Conversion completed. 2.1941: Sailed into the Mediterranean. 24.4.1941: Sustained forecastle damage during the evactuation of Greece. 26.4.1941: Further damaged and disabled being taken in tow by GRIFFIN to Alexandria for repair. 7.1941: Rammed at Suez by the burning GEORGIC which had been set ablaze during an air raid. Taken to Colombo for repair which commenced 28.12.1941. Subsequently uprated and saw service on the D-Day landings sustaining damage which was repaired on the R. Clyde during 7.1944. 1945: Sent for service in the Far East. 18.7.1946: Declared surplus to naval requirements. 8.8.1946: Handed over to Smith's Dock at Middlesbrough for restoration to her original profile. 12.1947: Returned to Glen Line service. 10.1970: Sold for $74 per light ton to Tung Cheng Steel and Iron Works, Taiwan, for demolition. 12.11.1970: Delivered at Kaohsiung. 10.1.1971: Work commenced. 28.2.1971: Completed.


DENBIGHSHIRE (1939 - 1967)
O.N. 166276. 8,983g. 5,393n. 483.1 x 66.4 x 38.0 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wain Maskin-og-skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

29.10.1938: Launched by N. V. Nederlandsche Scheepsbouw Maatschappij, Amsterdam (Yard No. 269), for Glen Line Ltd., London. 1939: Completed. 1942: Whilst serving on the Malta convoys was set on fire at Valetta and subsequently repaired. 1945: Served with the Pacific Fleet train. 1946: Returned to Glen Line Ltd. 12.1967: Transferred to The China Mutual Steam Navigation Company Ltd., (A. Holt and Company, managers), Liverpool. 1968: Transferred to The Ocean Steam Ship Company Ltd., (same managers), Liverpool, and renamed SARPEDON. 13.5.1969: Sold, for $49 per light ton, to Tui Cheng Company Ltd., Kaohsiung, for demolition. 11.8.1969: Delivered at Kaohsiung. 10.1969: Work commenced.


BRECONSHIRE (1) (1939 - 1942)
O.N. 172758. 9,776g. 5,908n. 482.0 x 66.2 x 35.0 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

2.2.1939: Launched by the Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Company of Hong Kong Ltd., Hong Kong (Yard No. 276), for Glen Line Ltd. 9.1939: Completed. 11.1939: Requisitioned by the Admiralty at the end of her maiden voyage and converted into a Fleet Supply Ship. 23.3.1942: Whilst enroute from Alexandria to Malta as part of convoy MW 10., was bombed and severely damaged by aircraft. Taken in tow and later struck a defensive mine whilst approaching Grand Harbour, and sank in Marsax Lok Bay, Malta and subsequently capsized during salvage attempts and was abandoned. 14.8.1950: Raised bottom upward, her superstructure having been cut away, and sold to Leopoldo Rodrigues, Malta and was subsequently towed, upside down, to Messina where she was beached pending scrapping or rebuilding. 1952: Sold to Navigazione Libera Triestina, Trieste and towed to Taranto and righted ready for rebuilding. 1954: Demolished at San Marco Trieste without having been rebuilt.


GLENGYLE (5) (1939 - 1970)
O.N. 166293. 9,919g. 6,045n. 483.1 x 66.4 31.3 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

18.7.1939: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 372), for Glen Line Ltd. 1939: Completed and requisitioned by the Admiralty. 19.10.1939 until 6.4.1941: Converted into a Fleet Supply Ship. 6.4.1941: Returned to commercial trade. 27.6.1941: Arrived at John Brown's Clyde shipyard for conversion into an Infantry Assault Ship. 10.9.1941: Conversion completed. 2.1942: Departed for the Mediterranean. Subsequently saw service far and wide sustaining little or no damage, being the most fortunate of the trio. 17.7.1946: Handed over to Vickers-Armstrongs, on Tyneside, for restoration to original profile. 3.3.1948: Returned to Glen Line service. 10.1970: Transferred to The Ocean Steam Ship Company Ltd., (A. Holt and Company, managers), and renamed DEUCALION. 1971: Sold to Tung Cheng Steel and Iron Works, Kaohsiung, for demolition. 9.6.1971: Arrived at Singapore. 12.6.1971: Handed over to Mitsui and Company, for final delivery voyage. 9.8.1971: Work Commenced.


GLENORCHY (2) (1939 - 1942)
O.N. 172760. 8,982g. 5,383n. 483.0 x 66.4 x 31.2 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

5.1939: Launched by the Taikoo Dock and Engineering Company of Hong Kong Ltd., Hong Kong (Yard No. 277), for Glen Line Ltd., London. 12.1939: Completed. 13.8.1942: Attacked and sunk by a German "E" Boat whilst 5 miles N. W. of Kelibia Light, Tunisia.


GLENARTNEY (4) (1940 - 1967)
O.N. 166297. 8,986g. 5,365n. 483.0 x 66.5 x 30.6 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

27.12.1939: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 373), for Glen Line Ltd. 1940: Completed. 1.1967: Sold for $140,000 to Seibu Koygo K. K., Japan, for demolition. 16.3.1967: Sailed from Kobe bound to Onomichi. 1.4.1967: Demolition commenced.


GLENGARRY (3) (1946 - 1970)
O.N. 181037. 9,144g. 5,392n. 483.1 x 66.5 x 30.5 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by the shipbuilder, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

6.11.1939: Launched by Akt. Burmeister and Wain Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen (Yard No. 643), for Glen Line Ltd., London. 5.1940: Completed, but seized by Germany when Denmark was over-run, prior to delivery. Subsequently operated as MEERSBERG by Hamburg Amerika Linie. Operated as a Submarine Depot Ship with the 25th. and 27th. Flotillas. 1942: Converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser by Wilton Fijenoord, Rotterdam. 1945: Commissioned as HANSA (Schiff 5) but did not operate. 4.5.1945: Recovered by the Allied Authorities at Kiel, allocated to the Ministry of War Transport and renamed EMPIRE HUMBER. 1946: Delivered to Glen Line Ltd., and reverted to GLENGARRY. 8.1970: Transferred to The Ocean Steam Ship Company Ltd., and renamed DARDANUS. 1.1971: Transferred to Glen Line Ltd., and reverted to GLENGARRY for her final voyage to Sakaide for demolition. At 09:00hrs, 10.2.1971: Delivered to Mitsui and Company, with the proviso (see note below) that the name would revert to DARDANUS prior to demolition. 1.3.1971: Miyayi Salvage Corporation, commenced demolition at Tadaju, Kagawa Pref.

[N.B. Although Lloyd’s Register records make note of the proviso to revert to DARDANUS they have no confirmation as to whether or not this actually happened.]
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  #5  
Old 6th March 2009, 03:49
teb teb is offline  
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Twin Screw Glens

Steve2- If of interest I sailed on Glenearn on her maiden voyage after refit(round australia trip)as 1st RO-great ship she was too-also did coasting trips on Glenroy-Glengarry-Glenartney -Teb








g
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  #6  
Old 7th March 2009, 11:29
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Click on this link for a piece on the Glenroy.
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/galler...67/ppuser/8509
Note:- There are two pages on this link.

Last edited by Hugh Ferguson : 7th March 2009 at 16:29. Reason: Addition
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  #7  
Old 7th March 2009, 13:18
steve2 steve2 is offline  
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Wow, Thanks for all the info Guys. I knew they got about and had a hard war. Shows how tough those ships were. Is there any truth in the tale that when the Glengarry was taken back into Glen Line there was a Swastika painted on a bulkhead in the engine room which the crew kept repainting until told to desist by George Holt?
Thanks again All - Steve2
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Old 8th March 2009, 12:02
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Tai Pan Tai Pan is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve2 View Post
Wow, Thanks for all the info Guys. I knew they got about and had a hard war. Shows how tough those ships were. Is there any truth in the tale that when the Glengarry was taken back into Glen Line there was a Swastika painted on a bulkhead in the engine room which the crew kept repainting until told to desist by George Holt?
Thanks again All - Steve2
Dont know about that steve, however John Paskett my 2nd R/O did locate a morse key that was from the German days, it was so heavy and stiff that you needed arms like Godzilla to use it.
It is now on show at Poldu Radio Club with a short history of Glengarry.
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Old 8th March 2009, 15:09
steve2 steve2 is offline  
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John- Slightly different subject but I remember from being on the Elpenor and Cyclops that the hulls were strengthened in way of the masthouses by sections of heavy riveting. This was to take the recoil from any guns that were to be fitted in case of war. The ships plans also included details of where the shell hoists were to be fitted. Don't know if the de-gausing gear worked as doubtless most of the copper cabling had been, errr, liberated.
Steve
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Old 8th March 2009, 22:53
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I sailed on the Glenorchy 1961 / 1962 ( ex Priam), therefore there must have been Blue Funnel twin screw ship of a similar class, how many ?.
There was a no stop policy, we had a piston failure on one engine just after leaving Suez east bound, down the shaft tunnel a large clamping strap was applied to the shaft of the defective engine. The engines where B&W double acting, combustion above and below the piston, Twin screw 6 Cylinders, with 8 fuel valves each cylinder, 48 fuel valves in total, each weighing 1 cwt. The piston change was carried out in the Red Sea whilst the other engine was running. The 3Rd engineer, whose job it was to use the big hammer and stretch the piston rod and tighten up the bottom nut was steaming , he was kept cool by being drenched with buckets of cold water from the brine room by his mates. The lower fuel valve fuel pipes where liable to failure, lift the fuel pump, disconnect the pipe and try to pull it out whilst the lower piston yoke was going up and down rapidly, but we loved every minute.
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Old 9th March 2009, 11:33
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always wondered what engineers did down there.
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Old 17th September 2009, 16:18
kennicott kennicott is offline  
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I was a junior engineer on Glengyle in 1960/61 when after leaving Suez westbound we had a major main piston failure, number 4 unit on starboard engine. This unit was stripped and we came home on the full port engine and 5 cylinders of the starboard engine (reduced revs). If I remember correctly we were only 2 days late.
Kennicott
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Old 31st October 2009, 14:49
John Earley John Earley is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teb View Post
Steve2- If of interest I sailed on Glenearn on her maiden voyage after refit(round australia trip)as 1st RO-great ship she was too-also did coasting trips on Glenroy-Glengarry-Glenartney -Teb








g
bit of a long shot this but if you are still on these boards Steve I'd love to see any pictures that you may have of the old girl, particularly if they included the radar shack where my Dad worked 1942-46 .

Swop you some of the war period

Nick
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Old 8th February 2011, 20:21
John Earley John Earley is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve2 View Post
John- Slightly different subject but I remember from being on the Elpenor and Cyclops that the hulls were strengthened in way of the masthouses by sections of heavy riveting. This was to take the recoil from any guns that were to be fitted in case of war. The ships plans also included details of where the shell hoists were to be fitted. Don't know if the de-gausing gear worked as doubtless most of the copper cabling had been, errr, liberated.
Steve
My Father who served on HMS Glenearn 1943-45 says that the de-gaussing gear was incredibly loud and used to make the entire ship vibrate and drum when entering and leaving harbour. Apparently the crew eventually got used to it and managed to sleep through it. When the de-gausing eventually stopped the silence was so deafening that all sleeping crew would apparently immediately awake in a state of panic !
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Old 24th December 2011, 16:39
Julian Calvin Julian Calvin is offline
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Bit late coming to this thread. Was on the (ex) Glengarry when she made her last voyage to Sakaide for scrap, paid off April '71. She was indeed renamed "Dardanus". When pilot boarded for inland sea passage, he could not believe that vessel still did 19kts. Not for long though as we then lost one engine.
If I remember correctly (doubtful nowadays) the Chinese. Bosun who paid off into retirement in his late 60s had only been on four Glen/BF ships throughout his life at sea.
Luckily left the ship at anchor so didn't witness the final indignity of her being run up the beach.
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Old 24th December 2011, 18:33
MWD MWD is offline  
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2 x 6cyl B&W double acting! can't think of much worse, except perhaps Union Castle's Capetown & Stirling Castles, 2x 10 cyl. versions, converted to run on heavy fuel oil!

Have many friends who sailed on them, luckily I managed to stay on the steamers.

MWD.
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Old 3rd October 2012, 07:41
sonofchippy2 sonofchippy2 is offline  
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Glenroy plse refer Website Glenroy.freeservers.com.

Quote:
Originally Posted by steve2 View Post
The old Twin -screw Glens were built prior to WW11 and reportedly were too speedy to join convoys. I seem to remember that one was converted to an Auxiliary Carrier and also that another one was captured on the stocks in the Nedderlands. This one was convered to an Armed Merchant Raider by the Kriegsmarine. I don't think she ever managed to get out of the Baltic and do any raiding. Anyone know any more about these ships war service?
Steve2
My father served on Glenroy 1940 1942, his story on a website. It has considerable technical info on engines , admiralty reports and photos.
It saw considerable action. Bombed straffed torpedoed and mined.
Almost sunk twice
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Old 3rd October 2012, 07:52
sonofchippy2 sonofchippy2 is offline  
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photos wanted of GLenroy anyone???

[quote=teb;298537]Steve2- If of interest I sailed on Glenearn on her maiden voyage after refit(round australia trip)as 1st RO-great ship she was too-also did coasting trips on Glenroy-Glengarry-Glenartney -Teb


Hi

Do you have any photos of Glenroy,?? My father served on her 1940 to 1942. I have many photos but want to make a model of Glenroy in her wartime role. Im particularly interested in superstructure details.
Derricks winches layouts etc, these wouldnt have been different in the war .so any at all above the decks would be of interest and useful to me.
If interested i have website inc photos etc of my father wartime experiences on her. You may be interested in the beneath waterline.
Photos of her in drydock showing her twin screws.
Glenroy.freeservers.com
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Old 3rd October 2012, 07:58
sonofchippy2 sonofchippy2 is offline  
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Glenroy please refer to Website Glenroy.freeservers.com.

[quote=BillH;298265]The following information is taken from an old back up CD I have at work but I believe what I have at home may have some additional info.

GLENROY (3) (1938 - 1966)
O.N. 166256. 9,809g. 5,875n. 483.0 x 66.4 x 31.3 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

15.8.1938: Launched by the Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Ltd., Greenock (Yard No. 571), for Glen Line Ltd., London. 1938: Completed. 10.1939: Requisitioned by the Admiralty at the end of her second voyage. 23.10.1939 until 30.4.1940: Converted into a Fleet Supply Ship. 10.6.1940: Arrived at Liverpool for conversion into an Infantry Assault Ship. 12.9.1940: Damaged by aircraft bombs whilst at Liverpool, requiring further repairs. 24.11.1940: Conversion completed. 2.1941: Sailed into the Mediterranean. 22.4.1941: Grounded at the entrance to Alexandria whilst outward to participate in the evacuation of Greece, and was left behind. Subsequently repaired and on 22 & 26.5.1941: Made two abortive attempts to land reinforcements on Crete being forced to withdraw by intense enemy aircraft actions and returned to Alexandria. 23.11.1941: Departed from Alexandria with supplies for Tobruk and when in a position 31.39N., 26.28E., was at 16:05hrs damaged by a aircraft torpedo. Subsequently her troops transferred to FARNDALE and GLENROY was taken in tow toward Alexandria by CARLISLE. However due to the nature of the damage she was beached at Mersa Matruh to prevent sinking. 26.11.1941: Refloated and 3 days later arrived in tow at Alexandria for repairs which were undertaken between March and November 1942 to make seaworthy for journey to Cardiff for permanent repairs. Early 1943 following repairs was reduced to a care & maintenance basis. 15.10.1943 until 21.2.1944: Converted into an LSI(L) at Belfast. 17.6.1944: Damaged by a mine explosion during the D-Day landings and returned to Cardiff for repair which took from 10.7.1944 until 20.1.1945. 21.6.1946: Declared surplus to naval requirements. 14.8.1946: Handed over to Silly, Cox and Company, Falmouth for restoration to her original profile. 27.5.1948: Returned to Glen Line service. 9.1966: Sold to Ataka and Company Ltd., Japan, for demolition at Onomichi. 29.10.1966: Sailed from Kobe bound to Onomichi but was resold and 2.11.1966: Demolition was commenced at Kure, by Tarumoto Sangyo K. K.


GLENEARN (5) (1938 - 1970)
O.N. 166254. 9,869g. 5,981n. 483.1 x 66.4 x 31.3 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

29.6.1938: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 368), for Glen Line Ltd. 1938: Completed. 15.10.1939: Requisitioned by the Admiralty at the end of her second voyage for conversion into a Fleet Supply Ship, by Palmer's at Hebburn. This took from 22.10.1939 until 25.4.1940. 6.5.1940: Returned to commercial trade. 2.7. 1940: Arrived at Liverpool for conversion into an Infantry Assault Ship. 13.12.1940: Conversion completed. 2.1941: Sailed into the Mediterranean. 24.4.1941: Sustained forecastle damage during the evactuation of Greece. 26.4.1941: Further damaged and disabled being taken in tow by GRIFFIN to Alexandria for repair. 7.1941: Rammed at Suez by the burning GEORGIC which had been set ablaze during an air raid. Taken to Colombo for repair which commenced 28.12.1941. Subsequently uprated and saw service on the D-Day landings sustaining damage which was repaired on the R. Clyde during 7.1944. 1945: Sent for service in the Far East. 18.7.1946: Declared surplus to naval requirements. 8.8.1946: Handed over to Smith's Dock at Middlesbrough for restoration to her original profile. 12.1947: Returned to Glen Line service. 10.1970: Sold for $74 per light ton to Tung Cheng Steel and Iron Works, Taiwan, for demolition. 12.11.1970: Delivered at Kaohsiung. 10.1.1971: Work commenced. 28.2.1971: Completed.


DENBIGHSHIRE (1939 - 1967)
O.N. 166276. 8,983g. 5,393n. 483.1 x 66.4 x 38.0 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wain Maskin-og-skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

29.10.1938: Launched by N. V. Nederlandsche Scheepsbouw Maatschappij, Amsterdam (Yard No. 269), for Glen Line Ltd., London. 1939: Completed. 1942: Whilst serving on the Malta convoys was set on fire at Valetta and subsequently repaired. 1945: Served with the Pacific Fleet train. 1946: Returned to Glen Line Ltd. 12.1967: Transferred to The China Mutual Steam Navigation Company Ltd., (A. Holt and Company, managers), Liverpool. 1968: Transferred to The Ocean Steam Ship Company Ltd., (same managers), Liverpool, and renamed SARPEDON. 13.5.1969: Sold, for $49 per light ton, to Tui Cheng Company Ltd., Kaohsiung, for demolition. 11.8.1969: Delivered at Kaohsiung. 10.1969: Work commenced.


BRECONSHIRE (1) (1939 - 1942)
O.N. 172758. 9,776g. 5,908n. 482.0 x 66.2 x 35.0 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

2.2.1939: Launched by the Taikoo Dockyard and Engineering Company of Hong Kong Ltd., Hong Kong (Yard No. 276), for Glen Line Ltd. 9.1939: Completed. 11.1939: Requisitioned by the Admiralty at the end of her maiden voyage and converted into a Fleet Supply Ship. 23.3.1942: Whilst enroute from Alexandria to Malta as part of convoy MW 10., was bombed and severely damaged by aircraft. Taken in tow and later struck a defensive mine whilst approaching Grand Harbour, and sank in Marsax Lok Bay, Malta and subsequently capsized during salvage attempts and was abandoned. 14.8.1950: Raised bottom upward, her superstructure having been cut away, and sold to Leopoldo Rodrigues, Malta and was subsequently towed, upside down, to Messina where she was beached pending scrapping or rebuilding. 1952: Sold to Navigazione Libera Triestina, Trieste and towed to Taranto and righted ready for rebuilding. 1954: Demolished at San Marco Trieste without having been rebuilt.


GLENGYLE (5) (1939 - 1970)
O.N. 166293. 9,919g. 6,045n. 483.1 x 66.4 31.3 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

18.7.1939: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 372), for Glen Line Ltd. 1939: Completed and requisitioned by the Admiralty. 19.10.1939 until 6.4.1941: Converted into a Fleet Supply Ship. 6.4.1941: Returned to commercial trade. 27.6.1941: Arrived at John Brown's Clyde shipyard for conversion into an Infantry Assault Ship. 10.9.1941: Conversion completed. 2.1942: Departed for the Mediterranean. Subsequently saw service far and wide sustaining little or no damage, being the most fortunate of the trio. 17.7.1946: Handed over to Vickers-Armstrongs, on Tyneside, for restoration to original profile. 3.3.1948: Returned to Glen Line service. 10.1970: Transferred to The Ocean Steam Ship Company Ltd., (A. Holt and Company, managers), and renamed DEUCALION. 1971: Sold to Tung Cheng Steel and Iron Works, Kaohsiung, for demolition. 9.6.1971: Arrived at Singapore. 12.6.1971: Handed over to Mitsui and Company, for final delivery voyage. 9.8.1971: Work Commenced.


GLENORCHY (2) (1939 - 1942)
O.N. 172760. 8,982g. 5,383n. 483.0 x 66.4 x 31.2 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

5.1939: Launched by the Taikoo Dock and Engineering Company of Hong Kong Ltd., Hong Kong (Yard No. 277), for Glen Line Ltd., London. 12.1939: Completed. 13.8.1942: Attacked and sunk by a German "E" Boat whilst 5 miles N. W. of Kelibia Light, Tunisia.


GLENARTNEY (4) (1940 - 1967)
O.N. 166297. 8,986g. 5,365n. 483.0 x 66.5 x 30.6 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by Akt. Burmeister and Wains Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

27.12.1939: Launched by the Caledon Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Ltd., Dundee (Yard No. 373), for Glen Line Ltd. 1940: Completed. 1.1967: Sold for $140,000 to Seibu Koygo K. K., Japan, for demolition. 16.3.1967: Sailed from Kobe bound to Onomichi. 1.4.1967: Demolition commenced.


GLENGARRY (3) (1946 - 1970)
O.N. 181037. 9,144g. 5,392n. 483.1 x 66.5 x 30.5 feet.
Two, 6-cyl. 2 S.C.D.A. (620 x 1400mm) oil engines manufactured by the shipbuilder, driving twin screw shafts. 12,000 bhp.

6.11.1939: Launched by Akt. Burmeister and Wain Maskin-og-Skibsbyggeri, Copenhagen (Yard No. 643), for Glen Line Ltd., London. 5.1940: Completed, but seized by Germany when Denmark was over-run, prior to delivery. Subsequently operated as MEERSBERG by Hamburg Amerika Linie. Operated as a Submarine Depot Ship with the 25th. and 27th. Flotillas. 1942: Converted into an Armed Merchant Cruiser by Wilton Fijenoord, Rotterdam. 1945: Commissioned as HANSA (Schiff 5) but did not operate. 4.5.1945: Recovered by the Allied Authorities at Kiel, allocated to the Ministry of War Transport and renamed EMPIRE HUMBER. 1946: Delivered to Glen Line Ltd., and reverted to GLENGARRY. 8.1970: Transferred to The Ocean Steam Ship Company Ltd., and renamed DARDANUS. 1.1971: Transferred to Glen Line Ltd., and reverted to GLENGARRY for her final voyage to Sakaide for demolition. At 09:00hrs, 10.2.1971: Delivered to Mitsui and Company, with the proviso (see note below) that the name would revert to DARDANUS prior to demolition. 1.3.1971: Miyayi Salvage Corporation, commenced demolition at Tadaju, Kagawa Pref.

[N.B. Although Lloyd’s Register records make note of the proviso to revert to DARDANUS they have no confirmation as to whether or not this actually happened
Re Glenroy.
You may be interested in the admiraty report on repairs undertaken whilst at a Buoy in Alex harbour and the subsequent voyage back to blighty( kept breaking down). No wonder motors under water for months.
refer the website Glenroy.freeservers.com.]
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