Amazing pictures of submerged lifting vessels - Ships Nostalgia
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Amazing pictures of submerged lifting vessels

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  #1  
Old 8th May 2009, 15:09
gordy gordy is offline  
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Amazing pictures of submerged lifting vessels

One of my offshore pals sent me these, I hope the link works!

http://gallery.me.com/gordonkbickerton/100316

Last edited by gordy : 8th May 2009 at 15:15. Reason: Wrong link
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  #2  
Old 8th May 2009, 15:58
K urgess K urgess is offline
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An update to QuickTime is required to view.
If, like me, you don't want the update then you won't be able to view it.
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  #3  
Old 23rd July 2009, 11:21
Shipinfo Shipinfo is offline
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You can watch or download it here: http://www.slideshare.net/guestfea29...r-presentation

You would have to join to download but it's free.
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  #4  
Old 23rd July 2009, 11:36
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salvina salvina is offline  
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Just watched it on the link you gave Shipinfo and it is truly amazing! The navy vessel featured was that HMS Nottingham?
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  #5  
Old 24th July 2009, 07:36
Shipinfo Shipinfo is offline
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HMS Nottingham: http://nineteenkeys.blogspot.com/200...-big-rock.html

Looks like a different ship but I'm no expert on navy vessels.

I always wonder how those heavy lift vessels cope with their cargo in very rough seas.
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  #6  
Old 24th July 2009, 11:44
Billieboy Billieboy is offline  
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Magic boats, Wijsmuller should have patented the idea. When I first saw the concept on a paper napkin in '73 it was a couple of hours before I'd calculated that it would/could work. As for how they cope with the load in rough seas, the sea fastening can be built to suit the expected weather, it's also built to class requirements, to suit the underwriters of the load. The loaded voyages are, "Weather Routed", either from De Bilt or Bracknel, ships keep to the coast as much as possible, and await good weather windows for trans ocean runs.

Last edited by Billieboy : 24th July 2009 at 19:49. Reason: added weather!
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  #7  
Old 24th July 2009, 12:38
heathenscot heathenscot is offline  
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Good link Shipinfo, I believe it's the USA navy destroyer "COLE" which was attacked in Aden.
Looking at those pics and the size of the load, I would imagine if that ship hit anything over a FORCE 8, she would go **** up. Then again, with new design techniques it could never happen??
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Old 13th August 2009, 07:14
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bugga divino bugga divino is offline  
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****up in a force8

Quote:
Originally Posted by heathenscot View Post
Good link Shipinfo, I believe it's the USA navy destroyer "COLE" which was attacked in Aden.
Looking at those pics and the size of the load, I would imagine if that ship hit anything over a FORCE 8, she would go **** up. Then again, with new design techniques it could never happen??
I have sailed as a second mate and as a mate on these same ships. Wasn't there for the USS Cole voyage though. Can assure you that the seakeeping characteristics of these vessels is extremely good, even in the North Sea off Stavanger with a Force 10-11 blow, with a 100m+ structure carried on the back. But, as with anything else, when the going gets tough, you..............well, head into the wind!
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Old 25th August 2009, 09:51
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O.M.Bugge O.M.Bugge is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heathenscot View Post
Good link Shipinfo, I believe it's the USA navy destroyer "COLE" which was attacked in Aden.
Looking at those pics and the size of the load, I would imagine if that ship hit anything over a FORCE 8, she would go **** up. Then again, with new design techniques it could never happen??
The only one that has gone belly up was MS 2. They hit a rock in Indonesia and got holed. The sister ship MS 3 is seen here sinking, but the rig she carried floated off. She is now back in service.
One of the early Superservants sunk in the Congo some years ago, also while discharging a rig.

Stability and seafastening is calculated and approved for every voyage and there is no such thing as "following the coast" from say Japan to Brazil or GOM with a 40,000 t. Production Platform on deck. (Refr. Blue Marlin in one of the pics here) The biggest problem is capabilities of some of the older J/U rigs to take the transport forces. Legs have broken off, or sustained sever damages on a few occasions.
The history of "Dry Tow" can be seen on this link: http://www.captainsvoyage-forum.com/...read.php?t=513
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  #10  
Old 25th August 2009, 10:09
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Amazing pictures - Thank You
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  #11  
Old 25th August 2009, 10:09
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O.M.Bugge O.M.Bugge is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bugga divino View Post
I have sailed as a second mate and as a mate on these same ships. Wasn't there for the USS Cole voyage though. Can assure you that the seakeeping characteristics of these vessels is extremely good, even in the North Sea off Stavanger with a Force 10-11 blow, with a 100m+ structure carried on the back. But, as with anything else, when the going gets tough, you..............well, head into the wind!
It helps to have 50 some odd Ballast Tanks to chose from, some high and some low. Stability can be adjusted to be "comfortable" under all conditions, not to "stiff" and not too "slack".

The USS Cole was carried by the Blue Marlin when she was still under OHT management, with an all Russian crew. The Navy had forgotten to tell CIA that, so the Special Forces that came on board to protect them during the loading got a shock when the Mate got on the Tanoy and put on his most commanding voice to give some instructions to his crew, in Russian. (Maybe they didn't know the Cold War was over?)
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