The White Beret - Ships Nostalgia
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The White Beret

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  #1  
Old 26th June 2009, 19:42
Dickyboy's Avatar
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Thumbs up The White Beret

During the course of my job, occasionally I have the great good fortune to meet and have a few brief words with these wonderful men of the Arctic Convoys. They would now be in their 80s and 90s yet seem as sprightly as ever, and they still talk the language of the sea, and have a great sense of humour. One actually asked me if he was likely to get seasick on the ferry with a twinkle in his eye. I laughed and told him that I knew what the white beret stood for, and that if HE were seasick I'D get off the bloody boat myself. When asked where they were going they said "A parade, then a few pints" That's the spirit!!
A privilege, and an honour to meet these old gents.
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  #2  
Old 26th June 2009, 20:36
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Well said Dickyboy Derek
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  #3  
Old 26th June 2009, 21:24
E.Martin E.Martin is offline  
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Artic Convoys

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Originally Posted by Dickyboy View Post
During the course of my job, occasionally I have the great good fortune to meet and have a few brief words with these wonderful men of the Arctic Convoys. They would now be in their 80s and 90s yet seem as sprightly as ever, and they still talk the language of the sea, and have a great sense of humour. One actually asked me if he was likely to get seasick on the ferry with a twinkle in his eye. I laughed and told him that I knew what the white beret stood for, and that if HE were seasick I'D get off the bloody boat myself. When asked where they were going they said "A parade, then a few pints" That's the spirit!!
A privilege, and an honour to meet these old gents.
June 19th i was at a presentation of the Merchant Navy Badge there were 14 of us getting the badge, when the Citations were being read i thought blimey I am in some great company today, got talking to a Sparkie with a good row of medals also spoke to an old chap who was 89 he was in the Royal Navy serving on a converted Whale Catcher on escort duty, he told me he was turned in when the ship rolled over onto her beam ends, he managed to get on deck before she Turned Turtle he swam away and I believe he was the only survivor, i asked him how come she rolled over he put it down to Black Ice.
I felt humbled and honoured to have been in their company.
I received the badge for fishing in 1947 and 8 years deep water as we used to say,We were there when they feeded them, not when they needed them.
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  #4  
Old 26th June 2009, 21:57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E.Martin View Post
June 19th i was at a presentation of the Merchant Navy Badge there were 14 of us getting the badge, when the Citations were being read i thought blimey I am in some great company today, got talking to a Sparkie with a good row of medals also spoke to an old chap who was 89 he was in the Royal Navy serving on a converted Whale Catcher on escort duty, he told me he was turned in when the ship rolled over onto her beam ends, he managed to get on deck before she Turned Turtle he swam away and I believe he was the only survivor, i asked him how come she rolled over he put it down to Black Ice.
I felt humbled and honoured to have been in their company.
I received the badge for fishing in 1947 and 8 years deep water as we used to say,We were there when they feeded them, not when they needed them.
Very many congratulations on the presentation of your Merchant Navy Badge.
Long over due methinks.
I know virtually nothing of the little ships, the trawlers, coastal fishing vessels, etc that did the un glamorous, dangerous work of patrolling, mine hunting, fishing and so on in those northern waters around the Denmark Strait. In boats I wouldn't want to cross the Solent in.
Perhaps someone (Who has been there) could start a thread dedicated to the Arctic Convoys, and the other ships, and boats! that worked in these extreme waters.
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  #5  
Old 29th June 2009, 19:21
E.Martin E.Martin is offline  
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Rnps

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Originally Posted by Dickyboy View Post
Very many congratulations on the presentation of your Merchant Navy Badge.
Long over due methinks.
I know virtually nothing of the little ships, the trawlers, coastal fishing vessels, etc that did the un glamorous, dangerous work of patrolling, mine hunting, fishing and so on in those northern waters around the Denmark Strait. In boats I wouldn't want to cross the Solent in.
Perhaps someone (Who has been there) could start a thread dedicated to the Arctic Convoys, and the other ships, and boats! that worked in these extreme waters.
Royal Navy Patrol Service (Harry Tates Navy) did stirling work in WW2 all over the world, hundreds of ships sunk and lots of lives lost, the mine sweepers were always the first there before any operation.
Up till last year they held their yearly reunion at Lowestoft which was their base in WW2.
Various books written about them, one i did enjoy,Trawlers go to War.
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  #6  
Old 29th June 2009, 19:46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E.Martin View Post
Royal Navy Patrol Service (Harry Tates Navy) did stirling work in WW2 all over the world, hundreds of ships sunk and lots of lives lost, the mine sweepers were always the first there before any operation.
Up till last year they held their yearly reunion at Lowestoft which was their base in WW2.
Various books written about them, one i did enjoy,Trawlers go to War.
Thanks for that.
I'll start looking into what looks like a largley forgotton part of the war.
I did meet a bloke many years ago who said he was in H T N in the Solent/Southampton area. Must have been a good posting
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