Hell on Earth - Ships Nostalgia
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Hell on Earth

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  #1  
Old 13th July 2010, 03:08
fredw fredw is offline  
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Hell on Earth

Spud Bashing on the Vindicatrix in Jan 1956, and being permanently hungry!! You know it! cheers FredW
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  #2  
Old 13th July 2010, 10:51
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Spud Bashing on the Vindicatrix in Jan 1956, and being permanently hungry!! You know it! cheers FredW
All worth it when you joined your first trip on a voyage of discovery
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  #3  
Old 13th July 2010, 16:58
ALAN TYLER ALAN TYLER is offline  
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"Spud Bashing" on my first trip, with a heaving deck beneath my feet and trying to use a right-handed peeler when I was left-handed. No Spud peeling machine, just me as I was told very soon in my career!!
Still peel everything with my right hand to this day.
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  #4  
Old 14th July 2010, 03:40
fredw fredw is offline  
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My first trip was on a tanker from Isle of Grain to Liverpool. It took all of 5 days in heavy weather. I caused a lot of amusement by turning up in my brand new Vindi uniform. First and last time I ever wore it (although the "piss jackets" came in handy!)
I gave it to an Arab gentleman in the Suez Canal in exchange for a tablecloth. I think his name was George Robey--very good man!!

Strange though, I never did get to sail in a passenger ship, only tankers and the odd tramp ship. I have no regrets, I`d do it all again. Must go, my bladder is filling up with emotion! cheers fred.
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  #5  
Old 9th October 2010, 14:48
sagalout sagalout is offline  
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5 dust bins of spuds & 2 of onions remember it well. Just as well I had a case of beer [1 shilling a can ] to get me thru it all
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  #6  
Old 9th October 2010, 16:40
fredw fredw is offline  
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5 dust bins of spuds & 2 of onions remember it well. Just as well I had a case of beer [1 shilling a can ] to get me thru it all
Barclays Red or Blue can?
After the first trip to Liverpool (5 day run job) it was back home on the train. My Mother thought I`d jumped ship! Happy Days!
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  #7  
Old 10th October 2010, 10:30
R396040 R396040 is offline  
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Never peeled spuds on Vindy 1947 but first trip was galleyboy it was regularly sack a day on LOCH GARTH, like entry above ,no pototo machines in those days. Great first trip though brilliant run,West Indies Panama and Canada and States West coast. Remember having row with deck crew when we were entering Curacoa and they started throwing my PEELED potatoes at hammerhead sharks which were accompanying us through picturesque entrance,I said use UNPEELED b******
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  #8  
Old 10th October 2010, 12:21
fredw fredw is offline  
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Never peeled spuds on Vindy 1947 but first trip was galleyboy it was regularly sack a day on LOCH GARTH, like entry above ,no pototo machines in those days. Great first trip though brilliant run,West Indies Panama and Canada and States West coast. Remember having row with deck crew when we were entering Curacoa and they started throwing my PEELED potatoes at hammerhead sharks which were accompanying us through picturesque entrance,I said use UNPEELED b******
I Remember Willem and Emmastad while on the shell tanker "Hadra"
Rum cost next to nothing, but coke cost a bomb, so we used to take our own ashore with us!
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  #9  
Old 10th October 2010, 13:25
Billieboy Billieboy is offline  
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I Remember Willem and Emmastad while on the shell tanker "Hadra"
Rum cost next to nothing, but coke cost a bomb, so we used to take our own ashore with us!
Rum and coke = two bottles for two and a half guilders, extra bottle of coke cost two guilders! the rum was white Bacardi, ice was free! At the Madhouse, Curaçao, 1964.
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  #10  
Old 10th October 2010, 16:54
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Sometimes it was more of a chore using the rumbler than peeling by hand. You still had to 'eye' the potato's, could'nt have the captains spuds winkin back at him, then you had to strip it down and give it bloody good clean. They were and probably still are a health hazzard. So sometimes I found it pretty relaxing to grab another member of the galley staff if no galley boy available and go sit on the poop deck in the hot weather and bash a few spuds so to speak.

My worst nightmare was fresh brussels sprouts, peel off the outer leaves and score a cross in the bottom. Use to take booldy hours, and thats with doing 'peel one, throw one over the side'.
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  #11  
Old 10th October 2010, 17:26
fredw fredw is offline  
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Sometimes it was more of a chore using the rumbler than peeling by hand. You still had to 'eye' the potato's, could'nt have the captains spuds winkin back at him, then you had to strip it down and give it bloody good clean. They were and probably still are a health hazzard. So sometimes I found it pretty relaxing to grab another member of the galley staff if no galley boy available and go sit on the poop deck in the hot weather and bash a few spuds so to speak.

My worst nightmare was fresh brussels sprouts, peel off the outer leaves and score a cross in the bottom. Use to take booldy hours, and thats with doing 'peel one, throw one over the side'.
I "employed" a south african fireman on the 4 to 8 watch. He used to like spud bashing. It was probably better than being in the engine room. I used to give him extra chocolate duff and vanilla sauce when it was on the menu.
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  #12  
Old 10th October 2010, 17:44
Billieboy Billieboy is offline  
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Originally Posted by kevjacko View Post
Sometimes it was more of a chore using the rumbler than peeling by hand. You still had to 'eye' the potato's, could'nt have the captains spuds winkin back at him, then you had to strip it down and give it bloody good clean. They were and probably still are a health hazzard. So sometimes I found it pretty relaxing to grab another member of the galley staff if no galley boy available and go sit on the poop deck in the hot weather and bash a few spuds so to speak.
On my first trip as J/E, I managed to get the, "night aboard", job for all ports after the first weekend in Yokohama. As this was a "B" article trip it meant four hours overtime every night in port and 24 hours for every weekend. The cook, also from Barry used to leave a side of beef hanging in the galley, (coal fired), the night deck apprentice used to eye the spuds and I used to cook. Pretty much every night, my work was finished at Midnight, so off I'd go and cook us a super steak onions tomatoes and fried egg supper. It was always at least a pound and a half of steak, sometimes with mushrooms, or bubble and squeak! Then the apprentice would do the washing up, I spent hours teaching him to cook, but it was a waste of time.....

Crash at 01.00 and be woken at 05.45 for a day ashore with the relevant girlfriend; then back for 17.45. what a life!

Last edited by Billieboy : 10th October 2010 at 17:46.
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  #13  
Old 10th October 2010, 17:50
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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A bit of downtime is what I thought of spud bashing out side the galley door, no one to lean on you if you had caught up with all other chores,never used the grinder if I had time it was just as much trouble to clean the plate to make sure it passed the march of the stripes whereas the peeling went over the side
loved every minute of being a galley boy.chefs assistant was fetch and carry jobs not to keen to show you their little secrets and short cuts Tony
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  #14  
Old 10th October 2010, 20:21
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What else did we hate cleaning in the galley then gents?. I never used to mind doing the meat slicer, in fact got some sort of perverse kick out of the getting the mechanics of it right, never used to mind the steamer for some reason or other, found the stove a pain in the **** so used to try and do it most nights so it never used to get on top of you. My pet hate for cleaning, or strapping up was probably individual derrier moulds after there'd been a duff on for sweet, and why was it called 'strap up'? come on old hands never did think of asking that one when I was at sea.
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  #15  
Old 10th October 2010, 20:55
cueball44 cueball44 is offline  
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What else did we hate cleaning in the galley then gents?. I never used to mind doing the meat slicer, in fact got some sort of perverse kick out of the getting the mechanics of it right, never used to mind the steamer for some reason or other, found the stove a pain in the **** so used to try and do it most nights so it never used to get on top of you. My pet hate for cleaning, or strapping up was probably individual derrier moulds after there'd been a duff on for sweet, and why was it called 'strap up'? come on old hands never did think of asking that one when I was at sea.
To wash up the saloon table gear- A steward is said to be ''On The Crockery Strap Up''.'cueball44'
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  #16  
Old 10th October 2010, 21:48
TonyAllen TonyAllen is offline  
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To wash up the saloon table gear- A steward is said to be ''On The Crockery Strap Up''.'cueball44'
There was a thread last year I think on that very subject I will try to find it again Tony
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  #17  
Old 11th October 2010, 16:19
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Galley jobs

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Originally Posted by kevjacko View Post
Sometimes it was more of a chore using the rumbler than peeling by hand. You still had to 'eye' the potato's, could'nt have the captains spuds winkin back at him, then you had to strip it down and give it bloody good clean. They were and probably still are a health hazzard. So sometimes I found it pretty relaxing to grab another member of the galley staff if no galley boy available and go sit on the poop deck in the hot weather and bash a few spuds so to speak.

My worst nightmare was fresh brussels sprouts, peel off the outer leaves and score a cross in the bottom. Use to take booldy hours, and thats with doing 'peel one, throw one over the side'.
As galley boy on Melrose Abbey in 1966,
96 bloods Hull - Rotterdam run, my job was to do final wash down in galley after dinner service,
I shouted to the 2nd cook ( Colin Ewen) to check all electrics off - all off seggy?,
affirmative answer, I threw a bucket of soapy water over stove top, bloody thing blew me and him clear across the galley. b##ered the stove, big hole through to the hold , two days in ming ming (Immingham) dry dock for repairs. I thought I was a cert for the sack, but couple of weeks later I got my rating and went one deck up to be a flunkey, (Roscoe the chief cooks pet name for stewards).
Re the spud bashing, on the Melrose we had a rumbler that would take a full sack, no problem with eyes - just let em rumble till there were none!
happy days,

rennop
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  #18  
Old 11th October 2010, 18:58
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Pat McCardle Pat McCardle is offline  
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I used to be a 'spud barber' when on nightwatch duties. I used to put all the spuds in a bucket with onions..............Then the spuds would cry their eyes out.

The old ones are the best!!
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  #19  
Old 11th October 2010, 19:35
cueball44 cueball44 is offline  
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I remember a galley boy on the trawlers who gave the spuds a short back and sides, they finished up like oxo cubes, when the cook pulled him about it he replied ''peel the b@st€rds yourself'' then turned in, he got sack and i don,t think he went to sea again,'cueball44'.
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  #20  
Old 12th October 2010, 07:51
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I used to be a 'spud barber' when on nightwatch duties. I used to put all the spuds in a bucket with onions..............Then the spuds would cry their eyes out.

The old ones are the best!!
Yeah right Pat, but it still makes me chuckle....
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  #21  
Old 13th October 2010, 00:46
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I was galley boy on the worst ship I had the misfortune to serve on, B.M's La Cumbre 18-3-55 - 22-1-56. Supposed to be Home Trade; yeah! Ten months later, paid off in Emden, because the bucket of rust nearly sank in a storm in the Channel. Anyway the point; if you pull up a photo of the La Cumbre you will see a hut of sorts on the extreme aft, that was the potato locker. I spent many a hour spud bashing, climbing into the "spud locker" just for peace and quiet. Something to be said for spud bashing.

Good sailing Rodney R602188
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  #22  
Old 13th October 2010, 10:21
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Originally Posted by kevjacko View Post
What else did we hate cleaning in the galley then gents?. I never used to mind doing the meat slicer, in fact got some sort of perverse kick out of the getting the mechanics of it right, never used to mind the steamer for some reason or other, found the stove a pain in the **** so used to try and do it most nights so it never used to get on top of you. My pet hate for cleaning, or strapping up was probably individual derrier moulds after there'd been a duff on for sweet, and why was it called 'strap up'? come on old hands never did think of asking that one when I was at sea.
Cleaning the extractors in the tropics and the pans if you had upset the boss man
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Old 13th October 2010, 10:46
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Being a deckie, I didnt have much to do with the galley, but on one ship, the rock dodger, Firth Fisher, it was our job to go in the galley at 05.00, and flash up the oil fired stove ready for the cook who turned to at 06.00.
This stove was a right royal bas**** of a thing and it would often take a full hour before it would ignite. The cook, couldnt even get it going sometimes, then we would all get sandwiches until the engineer could be persuaded to have a look at it.
Luckily there was a chip shop handy at each end of our Warren Point to Garston run.
regards,
Pat
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  #24  
Old 13th October 2010, 15:41
Vital Sparks Vital Sparks is offline  
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Being a sparks I had very little to do with the galley but on 1960s built British ships with their total separation of officer and crew accommodation, going via the galley was the only "indoor" route from one place to the other. One day, in the Pentland firth, we were being bounced around worse than usual and I was summoned to investigate a failure of the TV in the crew mess. So I headed down to the officer's saloon, through the double swing doors to the galley and was heading for the other set of swing doors when I spotted the 2nd cook looking a bit greeen round the gills. One minute he was stirring his pot of soup and the next he was contributing to it. Nobody had the soup that night and the Chief Steward blamed me for talking.
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Old 13th October 2010, 21:07
notnila notnila is offline  
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Being a sparks I had very little to do with the galley but on 1960s built British ships with their total separation of officer and crew accommodation, going via the galley was the only "indoor" route from one place to the other. One day, in the Pentland firth, we were being bounced around worse than usual and I was summoned to investigate a failure of the TV in the crew mess. So I headed down to the officer's saloon, through the double swing doors to the galley and was heading for the other set of swing doors when I spotted the 2nd cook looking a bit greeen round the gills. One minute he was stirring his pot of soup and the next he was contributing to it. Nobody had the soup that night and the Chief Steward blamed me for talking.
What a big clype you turned out to be!!!
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