RMAS NEWTON and SAL class - Ships Nostalgia
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RMAS NEWTON and SAL class

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  #1  
Old 26th December 2010, 10:06
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RMAS NEWTON and SAL class

Does anyone know what will happen to Newton when SD Victoria takes over her role? And does anyone know who runs the Sal class these days? I know Salmaster is now called Ocean Endeavour and is operated by Gardline but what about the other two? Photos will be welcome.
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Old 27th December 2010, 16:38
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SALMAID & SALMOOR became SD SALMAID & SD SALMOOR in 2008 and are still operated by Serco

SD SALMOOR seen at Portsmouth in May 2010
OCEAN ENDEAVOUR seen at Great Yarmouth in September 2004

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  #3  
Old 27th December 2010, 16:44
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This time with SD SALMOOR
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  #4  
Old 28th December 2010, 16:24
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SD NEWTON is for sale

http://www.damentrading.nl/damen/

See vessels under "support".

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bob
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  #5  
Old 28th December 2010, 16:41
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Newton For Sale

Interesting to note sale of NEWTON up until recently SD were offering here for charter. Also see a number of other ex RMAS vessels on the Damen site.
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Old 12th May 2011, 16:38
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SD NEWTON has been sitting alongside in Greenock for the last few months in the hope of getting some work for SERCO. She should be getting dragged off the wall and heading out to sea again in the next week or so I understand from a mate who has been given a couple of weeks work on her.
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Old 12th May 2011, 16:58
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Originally Posted by Slowone View Post
SD NEWTON has been sitting alongside in Greenock for the last few months in the hope of getting some work for SERCO. She should be getting dragged off the wall and heading out to sea again in the next week or so I understand from a mate who has been given a couple of weeks work on her.
The Bath Retired MSOs Lunch Club brought this matter up last Monday; nice to know she's getting some work to do. How will they man her? Agency? Their own guys? I reckon she'd make a great wee passenger/cruise vessel after some conversion work.
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Old 12th May 2011, 22:05
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She will be maned by agency staff, though one of my old team has gone back to her on the agency to help keep her going, the one key member missing with be a good ETO. Someone would need to spend a couple of quid on her to make her usable as a cruiser, though the hull is very good and most of the tanks are like new.
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Old 22nd May 2011, 15:43
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NEWTON is on it's way to Plymouth, passing Falmouth making 10 kts so they have almost made it to port. Will update info soon.
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Old 24th May 2011, 12:10
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With regard to the Newtons hull - class restrictions were imposed in the late 1990's due to the brittle nature of the steel used to build the ship. This meant the ship could not work North of 66N from October to March as low temperatures could cause structural problems. Even after this being discovered and restrictions implemented the "RMAS" still used the excellent ship amongst the ice floes pictures (taken by Mike Fishwick) for publicity purposes !

I also remember a protracted period in Portsmouth 1998 having extensive steel repairs done to the fore peak tanks due to excessive corrosion. All most all the stringer plates were replaced during that period.

The ship also suffered cracking across the deck just forward of the accomodation and it was all ways worry of being in a head sea when you felt the bow sheeves slam and the ripple of shock going throught the ship that the cracks would open up. The prudent Master would take the ship 20 degrees off the waves / swell and zig zag to try to avoid damage by slamming.
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  #11  
Old 21st June 2011, 19:08
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NEWTON was the best sea-boat the RMAS had I believe, well they have operated some that used to roll on a wet blanket, and were very uncomfortable and that's being charitable. Having taken NEWTON across the Atlantic a few times I agree with the sentiment that taking the sea on the shoulder made for a better more comfortable passage. Cracking of the deck was not a significant problem in later years, thankfully. Having been through all the tanks with the LR surveyor for her last special survey, she was in very good condition.

Having spent a lot of time looking at the ships vibration characteristics I came to the conclusion that running with the rafts unlocked probably added to the strange vibrations we all used to feel when in a big sea. The net effect was the top sets were oscillating at a different frequency to the main engine raft so she felt like she was bouncing !!! It was interesting but I never felt she was unsafe.
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Old 2nd July 2011, 17:02
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I reckon TYPHOON beat NEWTON when it comes to best sea boat. Mind you they still could not beat the relative comfort of WHITEHEAD when we spent many weeks at anchor in Kyle with the papers every day and a run ashore at night. Now thats what i call going to sea! Though the trip up from Plymouth was always fun as the old man always insisted on having the activated rudder on whilst going round Lands End.
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Old 17th March 2012, 18:18
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Seen at Greenock on the 15th March 2012

SD SALMAID (now apparently renamed KOMMANDOR CALUM), SD SALMOOR & SD NIMBLE.

SD NEWTON was also there.
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Old 17th March 2012, 20:22
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salmaid (or whatever shes called now) seems to be a lot higher out the water than salmoor.
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Old 19th March 2012, 20:52
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Going back to the days when the 3 Sal class were built, the 3 ships were supposed to be identical. But as the company was going to the wall at the time, the steel content went down as each one was built. Salmaster being the last one was significantly lighter than the other 2. There were a number of incidents while she was at Rosyth of aft bulkheads cracking in the ballast tanks, the shell plating in the steering flat ruptured when the ship was up off Iceland in heavy weather, fortunatly that was not the trip I was on! She was light but in good weather she was a lot faster than the other 2.
I recall Salmaster coming out of the Humber to see Newton heading for Rosyth for a refit, we had the pleasure of over taking the pride of the fleet and arrived in Rosyth well ahead of her :-)
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Old 19th March 2012, 21:29
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the beaks at bath tried to feed the skipper(you know who i mean mark), to the lions over the cracking and rupturing down aft.they felt that he ran on 2 engines too often, and that it had led to a lot of damage to the ship.ive been on all 3 sal boats at one time or another and salmoor was by far the best built.
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Old 20th March 2012, 23:16
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I recall departing Rosyth with the engine control system doing anything but control the engines, so Willie Miller and I tweaked the system to keep the show on the road. In really good weather heading North we managed to get 15 knots on one engine on Salmaster. I know from my time in Bath that Salmoor and Salmaid could not get close to that. Strange to recall now that getting that speed on one engine didn't give the same cavitation problems we used to get when running 2 engines up towards full pitch.
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Old 21st March 2012, 00:09
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i heard that it was a naval architect that shot baths allegations at the skipper down.that and the fact that the skipper was always told to make sure we got back to rosyth by friday.so in order to achieve that, sometimes he had no option but to go onto 2 engines.you know yourself mark.we sailed on a monday,and 9 times out of 10, we were back by friday.if we were not back by fri there was big trouble.i never understood how not working weekends saved the mod money.surely it would have been more cost effective to stay at sea for a couple of weeks to get all the work in a specific area done.instead of steaming down to the likes of the wash for 3 days work.then steam back to rosyth again on the friday.only to sail again the following monday, back to the wash again.the fuel costs alone must have been enormous.
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Old 21st March 2012, 11:37
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i heard that it was a naval architect that shot baths allegations at the skipper down.that and the fact that the skipper was always told to make sure we got back to rosyth by friday.so in order to achieve that, sometimes he had no option but to go onto 2 engines.you know yourself mark.we sailed on a monday,and 9 times out of 10, we were back by friday.if we were not back by fri there was big trouble.i never understood how not working weekends saved the mod money.surely it would have been more cost effective to stay at sea for a couple of weeks to get all the work in a specific area done.instead of steaming down to the likes of the wash for 3 days work.then steam back to rosyth again on the friday.only to sail again the following monday, back to the wash again.the fuel costs alone must have been enormous.
Bear in mind that the fuel bill wasn't paid by DMS(N)/RMAS but by PSTO(N) so operationally it wouldn't have made much difference but I agree that the Monday to Friday business was plain daft, all to save a few quid on overtime. I remember on Goosander having to return to Rosyth from Rosehearty and then because of bad weather not being able to get back out on the range for a while; the RAF were not amused and we were stuck with whalebacks all over the place for ages.
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Old 21st March 2012, 11:51
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Going back to the days when the 3 Sal class were built, the 3 ships were supposed to be identical. But as the company was going to the wall at the time, the steel content went down as each one was built. Salmaster being the last one was significantly lighter than the other 2. There were a number of incidents while she was at Rosyth of aft bulkheads cracking in the ballast tanks, the shell plating in the steering flat ruptured when the ship was up off Iceland in heavy weather, fortunatly that was not the trip I was on! She was light but in good weather she was a lot faster than the other 2.
I recall Salmaster coming out of the Humber to see Newton heading for Rosyth for a refit, we had the pleasure of over taking the pride of the fleet and arrived in Rosyth well ahead of her :-)
Mark, Salmaster was the second one into service; it was Salmaid that was last. I know this because the intended master and chief came on board Salmaster when we were working on the Humber to get an idea on what to expect. The master (Hugh somebody I think) spent the whole time saying "we don't do it this way in Devonport"!

Always nice to overtake the "flagship". When I was deep-sea the ship I was on was about a week out of Panama for Aussie. The "flagship" (new container ship) came flying past us and over the horizon. A day later we passed her while she wallowed in the Pacific swell; that night she romped past us again. Next day the whole scene repeated itself. This went on for a couple of days until our courses diverged; she was heading for Kiwi. Gives you that schadenfreude feeling doesn't it?
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Old 21st March 2012, 12:12
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Originally Posted by mil511mariner View Post
With regard to the Newtons hull - class restrictions were imposed in the late 1990's due to the brittle nature of the steel used to build the ship. This meant the ship could not work North of 66N from October to March as low temperatures could cause structural problems. Even after this being discovered and restrictions implemented the "RMAS" still used the excellent ship amongst the ice floes pictures (taken by Mike Fishwick) for publicity purposes !

I also remember a protracted period in Portsmouth 1998 having extensive steel repairs done to the fore peak tanks due to excessive corrosion. All most all the stringer plates were replaced during that period.

The ship also suffered cracking across the deck just forward of the accomodation and it was all ways worry of being in a head sea when you felt the bow sheeves slam and the ripple of shock going throught the ship that the cracks would open up. The prudent Master would take the ship 20 degrees off the waves / swell and zig zag to try to avoid damage by slamming.
I concur with the bow being slightly off the waves/swell to avoid slamming and stress of weather damage. The resultant "corkscrewing" motion, whilst not very comfortable, was infinitely better than suffering damage.

I notice from photos that the Ocean Endeavour (ex Salmaster) has had a breakwater fitted between the horns with lightening holes at intervals. I assume that this works a lot better than the portable so-called breakwater that Hall Russell/DG Ships gave us.

We used and had ours fitted (well aft of the horns) before heading up to the NW approaches for a February JMC. At the time I moaned like stink about the fact that it was only secured by insufficiently spaced bolts and had no lightening holes to minimise shock from walls of water; no one seemed bothered. First big wave after Pentland Firth the starboard end came adrift and over the next 15 minutes the whole thing gradually worked loose and then disappeared over the side! And this at reduced revs to avoid damage. When we got back to Rosyth I put a report in about it and surprise surprise heard no more.

The trip was a success though, eventually, after days of force 11s. Salmaster's motion and seakeeping qualities were good. Even some of the boffins on board managed to appear occasionally!
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Old 21st March 2012, 18:13
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big waves, big bangs,no sleep,food didnt stay down for long,and although we had a bond aboard, nobody was really using it.even the old seasoned sea dogs.give me a harbour tug any day.lol.
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Old 22nd March 2012, 18:59
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Not quite the same as climbing up the side of one wave and plummeting down the other, although I do remember doing something like that on Collie once in the outer Forth.
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Old 22nd March 2012, 20:26
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you should see the north-east corner of the basin when theres a south westerly gale blowing.thats rough enough for me these days mike lol.
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Old 5th April 2012, 19:00
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you should see the north-east corner of the basin when theres a south westerly gale blowing.thats rough enough for me these days mike lol.
You're right Roo. I mind driving Uplifter at full ahead one stormy day in the basin just to keep her in one position, it went on for quarter of an hour or so until we got a lull and got back alongside! Really I shouldn't have left the berth but hindsight's a wonderful thing. We were supposed to be working recovering AFD moorings when they changed AFDs in the 80s.
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