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An error has occurred in the script on this page virus.

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  #1  
Old 1st September 2011, 14:51
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al1934 al1934 is offline  
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An error has occurred in the script on this page virus.

My PC has become host to an unwanted virus which started off by displaying a notice "Internet Explorer Error: An error has occurred in the script on this page."

My PC started running noticeably slower (I have nearly 800Gbs of free space and 3Gbs RAM) and I received unwanted audio advertising through my speakers!

Norton 2011 cannot find it, nor can Superantispyware or Malewarebytes.

Can someone please advise?
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  #2  
Old 1st September 2011, 15:03
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Try booting your PC into Safe Mode then re-running Superantispyware and Malwarebytes

If you don't know how to boot into Safe Mode look here

http://www.computerhope.com/issues/chsafe.htm
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  #3  
Old 1st September 2011, 20:41
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al1934 al1934 is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paisleymerchant View Post
Try booting your PC into Safe Mode then re-running Superantispyware and Malwarebytes

If you don't know how to boot into Safe Mode look here

http://www.computerhope.com/issues/chsafe.htm
Thanks for the advice. I have carried out what you suggested. SAS only found a tracking cookie and Malwarebytes found nothing. I ran Norton, which found and quarantined Trojanmaljava.

Do you think that I have solved the problem?
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  #4  
Old 1st September 2011, 21:12
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lesbryan lesbryan is offline  
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Stop running so many spyware anti virus programmea thats will be slowing it down ,Get in touch with noton they will chevk remotely the programme and put it right assuming you have the full payed up software .Or if you have another user set up on you machine you may (may be able to sort it from there .from time to time these thing get on and you need to do these type of things to put it right
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  #5  
Old 2nd September 2011, 18:51
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al1934 al1934 is offline  
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Thanks, big les

I have uninstalled Superantispyware and Malwarebytes.

What is worrying me is that the virus is obviously still with me, because, although I don't get the error messages, I am still receiving unwanted audio advertising through the speakers. Apparently a symptom of the Internet Explorer Error Virus.

Any ideas will be gratefully considered.

Best wishes
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  #6  
Old 3rd September 2011, 07:49
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norton will clash with other antivirus programmes have tried a TROJAN Remover? It sounds Like You have A Trojan In Your System.Look Up On Google For A Free Trojan Remover, May Help You. Cheers vmr.
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  #7  
Old 3rd September 2011, 08:15
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Looks like you are not alone ! A quick Google with your symptoms gave this . Good Luck !!

http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=vir...ient=firefox-a

Mike

Last edited by MikeK : 3rd September 2011 at 08:18.
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  #8  
Old 3rd September 2011, 12:46
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Following various threads, the consensus seems that it is spyware and running Spybot or Adaware might sort it - I say 'might' !
The unfortunate thing is I had it a good few years ago on another computer and for the life of me I cannot remember how I got shot of it ! Probably the big hammer job and reformatted as it must have been pre XP days

Mike
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  #9  
Old 3rd September 2011, 15:21
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Thanks vmr - I have uninstalled the other two free programs and rerun Norton in safe mode with system restore off. Nothing there. Having searched Google, I am sure it is a Trojan virus. Thanks for your suggestions.

Thanks MikeK - like you, I have also had this pest once in the past and, like you, I can't remember how I got rid of it then. A sign of age? I will follow up on your suggestions.

Best wishes
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  #10  
Old 4th September 2011, 01:33
Doug Shaw Doug Shaw is offline  
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Quote:
I have uninstalled the other two free programs
The free versions of these programs neither affect performance nor the operation of Norton. These versions don't provide real-time protection and scans must be initiated manually. However, in both cases the commercial versions, which do afford real-time protection, can result in conflicts and performance degradation when run with another anti-virus program.

Alick, when you run a scan in most Norton anti-virus programs, a link appears at the conclusion of the scan that says something like, "If you think there are still risks, click here." Following this link will take you to a page on Norton's website from which you can download a more aggressive scanning engine than the one which is included in the standard product. You download this scanning engine in the form of an exe file, which you run manually.

Detecting all forms of malware on an active operating system is nearly impossible. This is because some forms of malware cannot be detected by anti-virus products while the operating system is in use. To get around this, Norton provides a bootable rescue CD to licensed users. This CD contains a cut-down version of Windows, and on boot-up it updates the anti-virus definitions (I think) and then it runs Norton anti-virus on the main operating system, which is not in operation. Finding cloaked malware by this method is much more effective than by other methods, because the malware can't shield itself when the operating system is not in use.

I haven't provided links to the relevant pages, because the downloadable files are probably operating-system specific, but the pages should be easy enough to find. I also haven't discussed the more complex methods of detecting malware like Rootkit Revealer and HijackThis, because their use requires an in-depth understanding of the operating system and Windows' registry. Besides, I have written about these free products in other threads, though I can't remember which threads they were.

It is important to remember that in many cases multiple forms of malware can be deployed simultaneously - a typical load might consist of two to eight different malware items and will often include a keystroke logger. Detecting and removing one form of infection doesn't guarantee that all forms are eliminated. Therefore, the most secure option for guaranteeing the removal of all malware for the home user remains re-installation of the operating system and programs. If a user uses a computer for Internet banking or another process requiring a similar level of security, I would always recommend re-installing the operating system when any form of malware (other than tracking cookies) is detected, even if the infection appears to have been removed successfully.

Hope this helps.

Regards
Doug

Last edited by Doug Shaw : 4th September 2011 at 02:01.
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  #11  
Old 4th September 2011, 10:43
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Make sure you have third party cookies turned of, on your search engine, and the pop up blocker is turned on.
Have you done your general house keeping ie cleaned out you cookies temp file and history etc, for the search engine that you use
NB
Also some nastys hide copies of them selves in the system restore file, so even if you think you have cleared them, they reoccur on start up. So once you have everything sorted and running normal before you shut down you may need to delete your system restore files and turn it off, but only when you are confident everything is running correcttly SHUT DOWN THEN RESTART AND TURN BACK ON SYSTEM RESTORE

Last edited by PAULD : 4th September 2011 at 10:48.
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  #12  
Old 5th September 2011, 01:48
Doug Shaw Doug Shaw is offline  
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Quote:
Make sure you have third party cookies turned of, on your search engine
PAULD, I think you mean browser rather than search engine, but otherwise good advice. It is, though, unusual for malware to hide in the system restore files, because it cannot reactivate unless the system is restored by the user and it cannot reactivate at start-up unassisted. It is probable, however, that malware that exists on a system will be included when a system restore point is created either automatically or manually. By restoring the system to a previous state using system restore, it is therefore possible to reactivate malware that has been supposedly deleted. However, scanning that detects malware infection in the working system will usually also detect it in the restore files, making re-infection less likely. Nevertheless, here again the advice regarding system restore is sound.

Malware that regenerates at boot time (start-up) is often activated by an entry in the registry, but the actual executable file may be located in any folder. It doesn't need to use a system folder. To complicate matters further, the executable part of the malware can also append to a legitimate executable file or take the place of a legitimate executable file by renaming it. In most cases it will use a system file. This lessens the chance of detection considerably, as it obviates the requirement for a separate registry entry by using the existing legitimate entry for the modified file. This makes some malware very difficult to detect by use of conventional scanning engines. It can, in most cases, be detected by other means, but the other methods require a significant understanding of the operating system that is generally found only in professional and advanced users.

Researchers have, as proof of concept, created a rootkit that is capable of surviving operating system re-installation, but as yet they have detected no such rootkits in 'the wild'. Therefore, as I said in my previous post, the most secure option for the home user who suspects but cannot clearly identify malware infection is a full system re-instal.

Regards
Doug

Last edited by Doug Shaw : 5th September 2011 at 01:50.
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  #13  
Old 5th September 2011, 08:18
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Like wot I mentioned - A big hammer !
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  #14  
Old 5th September 2011, 15:21
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Many thanks, Doug and PAULD. I am most grateful for all your good advice.

I do know about the Norton link, Doug. This leads to Norton Power Eraser and another drastic tool in their range. Earlier this year I had another virus, which refused to budge, and eventually I took advantage of the Norton Live Virus Removal. As you may well know, my PC was taken care of by far away people with strange sounding names who promised to put things right - in a very soon moment.

Ultimately, one of these fine gentlemen downloaded the dreaded Norton Power Eraser. As a result, I lost some folders and files and could not access all my programs. I had to take my PC to my local friendly professional IT company, who managed to recover the missing programs. I am, therefore, very wary of Norton Power Eraser and other Norton extra tools.

I regret that my IT knowledge is fairly basic and I am not competent, or willing, to carry out work on the registry or the operating system.

I have noticed that the audio advertising has since ceased to come through my speakers. It seems to have just gone away?

I will keep an eye on the situation and, if the virus makes itself know again, I will go to my local IT company (who supplied and carry out upgrades to my system) and ask them to carry out a full system re-install.

Thank you so much for all your advice.

Best wishes
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Old 6th September 2011, 00:42
Doug Shaw Doug Shaw is offline  
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Alick, just a thought - which again I've mentioned in other threads, but is possibly worth repeating. Malware often exploits system vulnerabilities. Keeping your system fully updated is essential, but few users, in my experience, take the trouble to do so. This is not surprising, because checking that every program on a computer has been fully patched would be extremely time consuming. However, there is a free program from Secunia that performs this task efficiently and I strongly recommend its use. You will find the download here. The program is very easy to instal and to use, even for those with basic computer knowledge.

Another point possibly worth repeating is in regard to cookies, of which there are three types. The first is the standard HTML cookie, which is simply a text file consisting of name/value pairs. The second, much more powerful and widely used cookie, is the Flash cookie and the third, which is even more powerful again, is the super-cookie or DOM cookie. When you set your browser to reject cookies, most browsers (except some of the most recent) consider only the HTML cookie. They will not block Flash cookies or the DOM cookie. To ensure Flash cookies are not automatically downloaded, you need to visit the Adobe website. You will find the Flash Player Settings Manager here. Using this Settings Manager is the only way to alter the global security and global privacy settings for the Flash Player and hence Flash cookies. The DOM cookie is not yet widely used. Note that the Flash Player doesn't need to be visible for Flash cookies to be downloaded. HTML cookies, being text based, are harmless, but Flash cookies can be made to carry out executable functions and greater care needs to be employed regarding them.

Again, hope this helps.

Regards
Doug

Last edited by Doug Shaw : 6th September 2011 at 00:59.
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  #16  
Old 6th September 2011, 08:52
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Can voucher for Doug's suggestion re Secunia. Installed it ages ago and it sits quietly keeping track of everything then every so often pops up and tells you which, if any, of your software requires an update (For some reason Adobe is constantly requiring new updates !)
I definitely fall in to the basic computer knowledge bracket !

Mike

Last edited by MikeK : 6th September 2011 at 08:55.
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  #17  
Old 7th September 2011, 16:04
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Many thanks, Doug and Mike

I had absolutely no idea of these refinements and will follow you advice right away.

Best wishes
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  #18  
Old 8th September 2011, 12:21
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Doug,

Can I ask your advice again, please?

When I downloaded Secunia the panel asked if I wanted to Run it or Save it. I am never sure about this one. Which is best?
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  #19  
Old 9th September 2011, 00:55
Doug Shaw Doug Shaw is offline  
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Alick, "save" is always the best option when it's available. Your anti-virus program will scan the file as it's downloaded and will tell you if the file is safe. Your anti-virus program will also quarantine any file you attempt to save in which it detects malware.

Having downloaded the installation file successfully, you run it from the location to which you downloaded it.

(If you click "run" you might be granting permission to an executable program on a remote server to perform tasks on your computer . This is usually okay on a trusted and secure site, but it is an option best avoided when possible.)

Regards
Doug

Last edited by Doug Shaw : 9th September 2011 at 01:30.
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  #20  
Old 9th September 2011, 09:08
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Thanks for that tip Doug, never thought about the advantages of 'saving', will do so in the future

Mike
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  #21  
Old 9th September 2011, 13:50
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Thank you, Doug.

I have always wondered about that one. Now I know. I had already run the Secunia file before I asked the question and Norton popped up, as always, to inform me that it was safe. In future I shall bear your advice in mind.

Best wishes and thank you again for all your advice
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