tankers speed - Ships Nostalgia
15:47

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

tankers speed

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 14th February 2006, 01:23
peter lewis peter lewis is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 120
tankers speed

i sailed on a few tankers in the 70s and 80s they varied in speed from slow steaming to the gulf from europe on avarage about 11 knots vlccs i also s ailed on a couple of tankers that could go 20 knots plus so the question i ask is what is the furthest a tanker as traveled in one day and what is the fastest speed that a tanker as achieved
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 14th February 2006, 17:32
jim barnes's Avatar
jim barnes jim barnes is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1967 - 1976
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
My location
Posts: 3,104
was on a shell tanker tied up to a American genorator ship in Danang, Vietnam that was mined by VC, quickest i have ever seen a tanker move.LOL
__________________
Be nice to me and you can drive my boat when i win the Lottery
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 4th April 2006, 09:25
billyboy's Avatar
Bilge Rat
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1957 - 1963
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 33,210
sounds like a bit 'sparklies" work Jim! ... LOL
__________________
"Imagination is more important than knowledge". A. Einstein.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 4th April 2006, 12:45
James_C's Avatar
James_C James_C is online now   SN Supporter
Malim Sahib Moderator
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Navigation
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
My location
Posts: 6,840
Even VLCCs these days can fairly shift. My last trip to sea (paid off in January) was a VLCC, and she could do 18 knots in ballast, and 16 in fully loaded condition (22m draught!).
Quickest tanker I've ever been on though was an LNG tanker. She was a steam turbine job and normal service speed was 21 knots, though we could push her to 23 if required.
At 21 knots she burned something like 240 tonnes of bunkers per day! However, being a gas ship, we would burn some of the cargo.
Not as daft as it sounds. LNG is carried ar -163 Celsius, with the tanks thickly insulated. As the voyage goes on, the liquid cargo warms up slightly (to at most, -160), thus some gas is given off. Rather than waste this gas by venting it to atmosphere, large compressors pump down to the boilers.
Effectively, you can go for weeks without burning a drop of bunkers!
__________________
Regards,

Jim
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 4th April 2006, 23:58
KIWI's Avatar
KIWI KIWI is offline   SN Supporter
KIWI
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Engineering
Active: 1949 - 1955
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 467
Can remember on Stratheden taking all of 12 hours to overtake & pass in the Red Sea a Niarchos World----- tanker.So even in the 50's some of them had a great turn of speed. KIWI
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 27th August 2006, 18:05
leo hannan
 
Posts: n/a
Houlder Bros. Joya McCance ex Beuval did 20 plus(not sure of exact speed). She was on charter to Shell and because of her speed she was a big earner.
Regards
Leo
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 27th August 2006, 20:41
pilot's Avatar
pilot pilot is online now  
Senior Member
Active: 1963 - 2011
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 990
Some of the new clean oilers abt.47,000 DWT are not fast. Loaded 11.5m they take some getting moving I can tell you.
From dead in the water seems to take for ever to get them moving. On a falling tide sometimes wonder if you're going to get out before running out of water.
Don't have to bother slowing down for the pilot launch, 8 knots is fine.
Rgds.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 27th August 2006, 22:20
Rusty Rusty is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 65
What about T2s? I joined one called the "Esso Avonmouth" in Fawley for a 3-month spell, delivering fuel to ports round the UK and N.Ireland. I was told she could do 18 kts - she was certainly faster than most of the cargo ships I sailed on.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 28th August 2006, 09:02
slick slick is offline  
Senior Member
Organisation: Royal Fleet Auxilary
Department: Deck
Active: 1958 - 2002
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,087
Tankers Speed

All,
Got to be the three recently departed "O" boats (Olmeda, Olna and Olwen) of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary Service.
Up to 24 knots, when pushed ie the Falklands War.
Yours aye,
Slick
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 28th August 2006, 11:06
price price is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
My location
Posts: 876
Tankers speed

In the late 1950s, on one of the Esso newly built 36000 dwt tankers[ probably the Winchester]. racing up the Red Sea/ Gulf of Suez for a north bound canal transit, a Caltex tanker, the 'Caltex Cardiff' overtook us. The Caltex Tanker appeared at dawn a few miles astern and, by dusk at the start of the first watch, she had all but disappeared over the horizon ahead of us. If I remember correctly, we had all the stops out, our speed probably something in excess of 20 knots, I would imagine the 'Caltex Cardiff' would have topped that by at least 2 knots, some speed!. The 'Caltex Cardiff' and her sister the 'Caltex Rome' were still in service when I worked for Texaco in the 1970s, renamed the 'Texaco Cardiff' and 'Texaco Rome', they were still reputed to be fast vessels.
The 24000 dwt. tankers 'Texaco Rotterdam', 'Texaco Ghent' and 'Texaco Brussels' were also fast ships. They formed a '500 club', all three vessels recording days runs in excess of 500 nautical miles. I can remember the 'Texaco Rotterdam', leaving Pembroke on a rising tide, bound for Avonmouth and arriving at King Roads for high water. A passage time of 5 hours from her berth at Pembroke Refinery to mooring in Avonmouth Locks.
Fast Tankers, but of course uneconomical as turbine propelled vessels in this age.
Bruce.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 28th August 2006, 13:46
peter lewis peter lewis is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 120
i was on the texaco rotterdam and the texaco ghent when they did the 500 nautical miles thats the reason i asked this question i can remember the skipper on the rotterdam geting very exited about it
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 28th August 2006, 14:44
price price is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
My location
Posts: 876
Texaco Rotterdam

Hi Peter,
Tony Reeves was the regular master on the 'Texaco Rotterdam' in my time,
a gentleman whom I held in high regard.
Bruce.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 28th August 2006, 17:25
peter lewis peter lewis is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 120
it was tony reeves at the time he was a very big man at one time then he lost a lot a weight i sailed with him quite a few times always had a lot of time for him
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 29th August 2006, 04:21
Split Split is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 532
tankers speed

Quote:
Originally Posted by price
The 'Caltex Cardiff' and her sister the 'Caltex Rome' were still in service when I worked for Texaco in the 1970s, renamed the 'Texaco Cardiff' and 'Texaco Rome', they were still reputed to be fast vessels. Bruce.
Hi Price,

The Caltex Rome was a T-2. I was mate of her at one time. She was, later,
jumboised- 1967, I believe. A great age for a t-2. When I left the company in 1963 the bulkeads were paper thin and we used to repair them with plastic patches.

If I remember correctly, the "Cardiff's" sister was the "Newcastle" or was it the Edinburgh"?

Split
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 29th August 2006, 09:34
price price is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
My location
Posts: 876
Caltex Rome

Hi Split,
Yes, you are completely correct, the Texaco, ex 'Caltex Rome' was a T2. I was working from memory without reference. The 'Texaco Cardiff' sistership was the 'Texaco Rochester' ex 'Caltex Bristol', the 'Caltex Newcastle' and 'Caltex Edinburgh' were of the same vintage but slighty smaller. Sorry for the confusion.
Bruce.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 29th August 2006, 09:59
Split Split is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 532
Quote:
Originally Posted by price
Hi Split,
Yes, you are completely correct, the Texaco, ex 'Caltex Rome' was a T2. I was working from memory without reference. The 'Texaco Cardiff' sistership was the 'Texaco Rochester' ex 'Caltex Bristol', the 'Caltex Newcastle' and 'Caltex Edinburgh' were of the same vintage but slighty smaller. Sorry for the confusion.
Bruce.
Of course, the "Bristol"! I'd forgotten about her. Well, we can both be excused our lapses of memory. It's been a long time!

Split
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 29th August 2006, 17:38
graham graham is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 297
T2 rogue river 1953 Swansea to Freamantle to the Gulf to Sweden to Tilbury 12 weeks and paid of that was a fast trip 2 cargos one of fuel oil one of crude regards
graham
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 29th August 2006, 20:11
Trevorw's Avatar
Trevorw Trevorw is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 254
Don't know about fast tankers, but I was certainly on one of the slowest - "El Mirlo" owned by Lobitos Oilfields of Peru and managed by C. T. Bowring. On a passage from Puerto De La Cruz in Venezuela to Isle of Grain, our average speed for the voyage was 7.4 knots!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 30th August 2006, 02:57
Retired Ancient Mariner
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1952 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 1,990
Caltex Siagon was aT2 and a ripe age in 1962.
Held together with "Thistlebond" and off watch was slapping that on pipelines and bulkheads.
Quick load in Bahrain was 7 days as we kept going off spec as cargo was getting mixed due to pipe line failures etc.
Last Caltex ship as after three months I was down the gangway after the pilot a customs officer. Never went back as safety as long as it cost nothing seemed to be the way they worked
What a scary experiance as there was always something going wrong, like the for'd pumproom full of cargo, jet fuel jetting out a crack in the hull to name but two.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 30th August 2006, 08:21
Split Split is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 532
tankers speed

To Lakercapt,

We must have crossed paths. I was mate of the Saigon from January '62 until Sept '62. I joined in Port Said and left in Avonmouth. If you were mate I must have relieved you, or you me.

Did not sign a new contract and left to look for another company. Little was I to know that I was not to work on another ship again. I met my future wife and have stayed ashore ever since.


Split
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 31st August 2006, 11:25
Nelson Nelson is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 24
Hi Trevorw,
I`ve never heard anything about C.T.Bowring on this site before, apart from an inquiry I made a few months ago.In the `60s, I was R/O on the "Orlando," which was owned by them. We used to run from the Persian Gulf to Oz most of the time.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 31st August 2006, 14:39
Retired Ancient Mariner
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1952 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 1,990
Split:
Sorry but I was on that heap from December 5, 1962 till January 21 1963.
Did indeed leave her in Avonmouth.
Rememeber it was a miserable Christmas and new years.
Went back to my girlfriend who became my wife (45 years ago and still married).
Person who was master was called Anderson from Aberdeen and you know the reputation of Aberdonians !!!! (True or false)
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 31st August 2006, 16:30
Split Split is offline  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 532
tankers speed

Thank God I had good company with a master named Reid, from Edinburgh,
who was with his wife. Also, great friends with the chief engineer, Stan Robinson and wife.

I cleaned the Saigon from black to white oil on our way to Baton Rouge in filthy Atlantic weather for a cargo of aviation fuel and then we ended up running stuff into Haiphong, etc.

I have a wealth of stories I could tell about her. Once we were discharging No 2 tank and when we got below the main line we uncovered a hole and there was an ominous noise of air being sucked. I went down the tank with the smoke mask on and put a clamp on the pipe.

Normally, we loaded three grades but I have loaded five into her and I knew that there had to be something better than that so, like you, I voted with my feet. A shame, really, because I liked the company but could not see much future, only as master of rotting t-2s.

Did you lift rust from the tanks? We used to lift hundreds of buckets of rust from the tanks.

We must have got married at the same time. I didn't know her when I stepped ashore. A very fast and successful romance and still going strong, with grandchildren.

Split

Last edited by Split : 31st August 2006 at 16:35.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 1st September 2006, 14:52
Retired Ancient Mariner
Organisation: Merchant Navy
Department: Deck
Active: 1952 - 1998
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
My location
Posts: 1,990
Hi Spllit
Did a short spell on the Caltex Newcastle and was transferred to the Saigon in Cardiff where she was undergoing repairs.
Rust, where was the steel.!!! I was offered a contract and having seen the way contract mates/engineers were treated declined their offer. Like you saw no prospects as they were still influnced by the US office and they did inspections etc. Lots of BS on a beat up T2 where the only thing that was certain to work was the crew. Lost weight as the food was not so good and lived on curry and vitamin pills from the "Butler".
All Indian ratings when I was there.
Not one good memeory of that short episode tho I did receive a letter from the London office thanking me for my services and should I wish to reconsider etc.
Regards
Bill
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 1st September 2006, 22:45
Semaj's Avatar
Semaj Semaj is offline  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 186
MV Luxor 6 cyl Doxford did about 14 knots but on average 12.
Loved watching the banjo pipes going up & down as if on elastic bands.

Jim.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
shell tankers ashley Shell 110 16th July 2013 13:36
British Tankers lakercapt Tankers 15 24th February 2010 05:09
Tankers marsat2 Tankers 7 23rd May 2007 23:18
Searcing For Two Tankers Used In World War II GoodOkieDad Say Hello 9 18th January 2006 18:31
Single Hull Tankers fred henderson Royal Fleet Auxiliary 4 22nd August 2005 23:38



Search the net with ask.com
Support SN
Ask.com and get


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.