Life at sea with BP - Ships Nostalgia
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Life at sea with BP

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  #1  
Old 11th June 2006, 23:50
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Life at sea with BP

There must be hundreds of funny, sad and unbelievable stories of life at sea with BP. Lets get them written and shared before they are long gone and forgotten. This one will get the ball rolling:-

I have followed this thread initiated by Brian(Benjidog) closely and found it both amusing and enlightening. I wonder how on earth the diesel engineers on the mv “British Commodore,” which was an innovative BP tanker built in 1967, managed to cope with the situations which arose in the second half of 1970.

This approximately 68,000d.w.t. motor ship was fitted with the following “steam equipment.”
One 88,000 pounds per hour Babcock and Wilcox integral furnace water tube boiler operating at 285 PSI coupled to an Exhaust Gas Boiler powered by the exhaust gasses from the Main Diesel Engine.
At sea speed the Exhaust Gas Boiler generated sufficient steam to run the Turbo Alternator which produced sufficient electric power to run the engine room plant without the necessity of running a Diesel Alternator or firing the Main Boiler.
The Evaporator used Main Diesel Engine Jacket Water as it’s heating source.
In port the cargo was discharged by Turbine Driven Cargo pumps and obviously in port it was necessary to fire the Main Boiler.
There was also an Auxiliary Package Boiler – 150PSI.
The Butterworth Heater when required used steam from the Main Boiler as did the Cargo Heating System.
In the centre of all this “steam equipment” was an 18,000BHP, 9 cylinder, 840mm bore VT2BF Burmeister and Wain Diesel with three Turbo Chargers.

I had just joined the ship as Chief Engineer prior to her departure from Malta Dry-Dock to pick up a cargo in the Eastern Med. (cannot remember where). The cargo was to be discharged at the Isle of Grain and required heating to a certain temperature to ensure it would not solidify. Shortly after departing Malta we experienced a leaking generating tube in the Main Boiler. This tube was plugged.
Upon leaving the loading port we lost further generating tubes which required “plugging.”
Halfway back down the Med., it became time to commence heating the cargo and the boiler continued having tube failures.
Even with the Evaporator operating at full capacity our distilled water tanks were not holding their own and in fact we had to supplement the boiler feed water with water from the domestic tanks. The problem of the leaking boiler tubes and the necessity to heat the cargo was discussed with Capt. Joe Beattie ( a grand Scotsman ) and he suggested calling at Algeciras (Spain) ( no idea how to spell it ) and take on as much domestic water as possible to enable us to reach the IOG and heat the cargo. I discussed this with Head Office and they agreed and in fact when we arrived in Algiceras, Engineer Superintendent, Stan Symon (now sadly deceased) was on the jetty to greet us. Following discussion, his opinion agreed with my own ref the cause of the boiler tubes failing, namely the result of improper or incomplete internal chemical cleaning during the dry-docking.

On departing the port the tubes were leaking to such an extent that the water could be seen through the inspection window boiling on the furnace floor. It was decided not to attempt any further tube plugging but proceed full speed to IOG.

We arrived at IOG without further incident and proceeded to discharge the heated cargo at a reduced rate so as not to fire the boiler too hard.

The Senior Superintendent fro “A” Fleet, David Gibbons inspected the boiler during the discharge and witnessed the leaking water “boiling” on the furnace floor.

He then made the decision that the Main Boiler, Screen and Generating tubes would be replaced during the passage to the Gulf around the Cape by a Sea Going Maintenance Team from (if I remember – Sweden/Norway) who would join the ship at Las Palmas together with the new tubes.

This would entail passage from Las Palmas to the Gulf with electrical power supplied by the two Paxman Diesel Alternators and steam for domestic and fuel heating from the Aux. Package Boiler. In view of the fact that the Paxman diesels had never been run for a sustained period and that one unit at maximum load could barely sustain the full speed required electrical load the Diesel Engineers were not too happy with this scheduled boiler repair.

We departed the IOG after both Paxman diesels had been serviced by a Manufacturer’s Rep., with the two units operating in parallel.

Except for some boiler tube tool problems and the fact that we were seven generating tubes short, problems which were resolved off Durban with the assistance of the local BP Superintendent Donaldson, the passage was without incident and the boiler repair completed on schedule and tested one week prior to arrival at the Gulf loading port.

The Paxman Diesel Alternators had done their job – had they suffered? – read on.

Several days into the loaded passage towards Cape Town the Main Engine had to be stopped in order to clean the Jacket Water Coolers. Because air was being supplied to the main deck it was necessary to supplement the Turbo Alternator electrical load with the Outboard Paxman Alternator.
There was aloud bang from the Outboard Paxman and two crankcase doors “blew off.” This was noticed by the watch keeping Junior Engineer who had just added one gallon of oil to the Paxman diesel. He informed the Engineers in the Control Room by intercom. Surprisingly the unit continued to run and remained on load in parallel with the Turbo Alternator. On receiving the message the Engineers in the Control Room took the unit of load and shut it down, started the inboard Paxman Alternator remotely and put it on load in parallel with the Turbo Alternator.

No alarms(all of which were operational)sounded in the Control Room. Examination revealed that the number two “A” bank connecting rod had fractured, the top half of which came out through the crankcase door together with the piston gudgeon pin. (Nearly caught by the Electrician, Fred Stewart who was in the area) The cylinder head was removed and exposed the top half of the piston seized at the top of the liner, but bit dropped out when given a light tap. The remainder of this piston was found in the sump. Two “B” connecting rod was found bent but intact. Number two “A” liner was found broken into several small pieces for the lower half of its length and the bottom of number two “B” liner was also broken off. The crankshaft balance weight was found broken off in way of the aft retaining bolt. The Liner Block Casting was found damaged in several areas. It was soon decided that the unit could not be repaired due to lack of all necessary spares and these were immediately ordered by cable and passage was resumed.

Five days later it was once again necessary to stop the Main Engine due to failure of the Exhaust Gas Boiler Circulating Pump. The inboard Paxman Diesel Alternator was immediately started and put in parallel electically with the Turbo Alternator as when the Main Engine is stopped quickly it was necessary to ignite fires in the Main Boiler to prevent loss of steam pressure. The Exhaust Gas Boiler was isolated and drained and passage resumed.

Shortly after this steam vapor was noted issuing from the Inboard Paxman Diesel crankcase breather. The unit was shut down for examination. This examination revealed nothing except a slight trace of water in the sump. This water was drained and the unit restarted. As the electrical load was gradually increased to maximum as a test a copious flow of steam vapor issued from the breather. The unit was again shut down and the fault found to be a leaking lube oil cooler. As we had no spare cooler tube stack on board it was decided to exchange coolers with the defective outboard Paxman Diesel.

24 hours later the Main engine had to be slowed due to a Scavenge Fire. I was called and as the fire was quite fierce stopped the Main Engine and extinguished the fire with the steam smothering system.
During this period the Turbo Alternator began to vibrate seriously and within a very short span of time was vibrating so severely that that it was sufficient to operate the over speed trip mechanism. The unit did NOT over speed.

As work on exchanging the Paxman Lube Oil Coolers was not complete we suffered a total power failure.

Within one hour work exchanging the coolers was completed and the Inboard Paxman Diesel Alternator was started and put on load.
Work also commenced lifting the Turbo Alternator cover in order to examine the turbine rotor and bearings.
Work also commenced cleaning the Main Engine Scavenge spaces.

The situation was now as follows:
We had one serviceable Paxman Diesel Alternator.
We were heading north away from the major South African Ports
We were unsure if the Turbo Alternator could be repaired until a thorough examination was complete.
Head Office was advise of the situation.

The Captain received a cable fro HO requesting us to call Mr. David Gibbons as soon as possible. As there was no answer we finally reached Mr. Gibbons at his home number. Mr. Gibbons advised the Captain to change course and head fro Walvis Bay. He advised myself to endeavor to overhaul the Turbo Alternator and prove it with a full load 12 hour test before the Captain could revert to the original Northern course.

The Captain commenced heading to Walvis Bay at 1230hrs and at 1535hrs the inboard Paxman Diesel Alternator failed resulting in a complete power failure. As the Main Engine was doing full speed at 108rpm at the time I had to “kick” the engine astern on air to stop it dead and thus avoid bearing damage due to lack of lubricating oil.

Examination of the Inboard Paxman Diesel revealed that the Number two “A” bank exhaust valve had broken. The cylinder head was removed revealing that the piston had forced the broken exhaust valve into the head leaving a two inch diam. hole in the head. A spare head was fitted together with a new piston and connecting rod. The liner was satisfactory. Upon completion the engine could not be “barred over” by hand and it was suspected that part of the broken valve had found its way into another cylinder. The other “A” bank head was removed and a piece of broken exhaust valve found on top of number three “A” piston but both piston and head appeared undamaged, Unit was closed up. However nothing ever comes easy!! The unit would not start due to the bendix mechanism sticking in the engaged position putting a severe load on the Air Start Motor holding bracket causing it to fracture. All parts were replaced and unit started without a further problem.

Main boiler was fired and steam admitted to the Jacket Water Heating System and the Lubricating Oil Sump. After a thirty six hour delay passage was resumed to Walvis Bay with a load of 230KW on the Paxman Diesel Alternator. This low load was achieved with the Paxman Diesel running on diesel fuel thus eliminating the requirement for heating steam and therefore no boiler. All non essential lighting was shut off. All vent fans were shut off except one in the Engine Room. The Galley was limited to the absolute minimum.

Approximately 24 hours later the vessel was safely anchored in Walvis Bay.
Paxman and Brotherhood Turbine reps. were waiting to board the vessel (with spares.)
The Paxman Rep. condemned the Outboard engine and it was removed from the Engine Room and stored on the bridge deck. HO advised a replacement engine would be supplied at the discharge port. His reasons for the failure – Malta Dry-Dock had apparently broken off the crankshaft balance weight during repairs, fabricated a new one but refitted it with non standard retaining bolts which threw the crankshaft out of balance. Also the connecting rods and bottom ends (which are matched pairs) had been assembled at random. During the overhaul the pistons were probably put in from the top instead of through the crankcase most likely breaking the rings in the process. A good case for having a Makers Rep. present at overhauls.

The Brotherhood Rep. fitted a spare turbine rotor, renewed the high speed bearings. labyrinths packing and high speed flexible coupling. He found the old rotor to be “throwing .003””. His opinion was that the problem was caused by the rotor not being true between centres.

The ship was out of service for ten days.

The passage from Walvis Bay to Ravenna was completed without incident except Number 6 Main Engine Liner fractured and had to be replaced. Diesel Engineers delight!!

My point with this lengthy tale is that all the Engineers except myself
were Diesel men and I had served on steam and diesel. These so called Diesel Engineers coped extremely well with the steam system problems encountered which is why I prefer the terms Marine Engineer or Ships Engineer. Marine Engineers, no matter what their background can handle any problem with little guidance That’s what makes us unique!

Roger
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Old 12th June 2006, 01:48
raybnz raybnz is offline  
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Thanks Roger for the report.I enjoyed reading it. As a ex engineer I would go with your last paragraph. We were unique. A lot of skills I picked up at sea I still use today.

If only we all were paid for those extra hours we worked.
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Old 12th June 2006, 11:09
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Steamy engine rooms!

A wonderful story Roger and the epitome of what happens when things go wrong down below, in this instance mostly attributable to the quality of workmanship of Malta drydocks.... & how the knights in shining white overalls come to the rescue ... ok, so they might be a bit grubby by days end....


Shore siders have absolutely no idea of what a breakdown at sea entails and from the catalogue of failures , you and your guys had a bellyfull of repairs to contend with, to say nothing of THOSE temperatures; more so on a steam turbine ship in the tropics.

If you ever find time to read the following report concerning the collision of the Chinese bulker " Bright Field" with a shopping mall on the River Mississippi ( which I am shocked to see was 10 years ago already) , then it makes compulsive reading for anybody with any knowledge of marine engineering.

Yes , the official report is 99 pages long, but thoroughly worth devouring. If you are short of time then try to read from page 48 " Inspections , tests & research" onwards.

You'll be hooked !

http://www.ntsb.gov/publictn/1998/MAR9801.pdf


Regards,
Rick
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Old 12th June 2006, 14:49
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Those maintenance teams which came on board if I remember rightly they were a Dutch company, they had crews of men from all over Europe and Scandanavia even some Spaniards from the Canaries I cannot remember how the company name was written but it sounded like nikerwerker,at least that what was used in Esso

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Old 12th June 2006, 15:10
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Thanks for activating my brain cells. Not sure what country they came from but the Company name was Nickoverken. Not sure of spelling.
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Old 25th June 2006, 21:28
richardc richardc is offline  
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How did you get on with the Inert Gas system on the Commodore? I sailed on the Centaur maiden voyage and we had a major problem when we discharged our first cargo at Grain. It turned out that the input to the tanks from the IG system couldn't keep up with output from the tanks of the cargo pumps. The first we knew of it was the pumps struggling and discharge rates falling. We eventually found the problem, stopped the pumps and opened the mast riser, it took ages for the pressure to equalise.
I don't think the problem was cured during the 6 months I was on the ship. We always had problems getting decent IG readings in the tanks.
Regards,
Richard.
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Old 27th June 2006, 02:09
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Richard,
I read your comments ref. the Inert Gas System on the British Centaur with interest. I served as C/Eng. on the British Commodore in 69 and C/Eng on the Centaur twice in 72/73.
Both vessels from new had not performed to design expectations discharging cargo.
We never experienced the IGS problem you refer to on either vessel but the Commodore did have a problem producing sufficient IG when I first joined which was caused by the Main Deck Isolating valve being in a half open position when indicating it was full open. As you can imagine this problem took considerable time to discover as we started at the IG Fans, Scrubber Tower and Engine Room Valves before getting to the Deck Seal and the Main Deck Isolating Valve.
The problem with the poor cargo discharge performance was discovered on the Centaur on my second tour and was an original design problem.
Total steam available from the boiler at maximum output was 88,000 lbs. Per. Hour.
To run the three cargo pumps at maximum rpm of 1750 according to the turbine and pump manufacturers drawings required 60,000 lbs. Per. Hour of steam, whereas the Operating Data for the vessel stated that only 42,000 lbs. Per Hour of steam were available for Deck and Cargo Pumps of which 36,000 was for the cargo pumps.

Under ideal conditions with the Centaur discharging into the British Dragoon at Lyme Bay with the boiler operating at absolute maximum output the respective cargo pump turbine revolutions obtained were 1300, 1230 and 1400 per minute. Maximum cargo rate obtained was 5632 Tons/Hour. Average IG was 5% Oxygen.

Referring back to your IGS problem I do not understand why the Pressure/Vacuum Valve on the IG Main did not operate to prevent a vacuum forming in the cargo tanks but this would have had the same effect as opening the mast riser valve namely letting air at 21% O2 enter the system. Also the IG Main Low Pressure Alarm should have operated warning of an impending dangerous situation requiring immediate shut down of the cargo pumps while a positive IG pressure still existed in the cargo tanks.

Sorry, guess I got a bit technical, but as you must realize I had my disagreements with the so called Cargo Expeditors who visited the ships to monitor discharge rates during the early 70’s.

Best Regards - Roger
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Old 27th June 2006, 07:07
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiefCharles
Thanks for activating my brain cells. Not sure what country they came from but the Company name was Nickoverken. Not sure of spelling.
Ahoy,
Company's name was Nicoverken Holland b.v.and is specialised in ship repairs, overhaul of diesel engines, etc. through our 24 hour worldwide service.
http://www.nicoverken.nl/
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Old 27th June 2006, 20:37
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A remarkable tale of persisting against the odds! Thanks for telling it Roger.

Brian
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Old 28th June 2006, 11:20
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Morning Roger,
just wondering what your surname is seeing as it is quite possible that we both sailed together on the Venture in '69. I was senior Nav/App. Remember a J/E by the name of Edwards who played guitar. Chief Stewards Ken Moyce and Tommy (TC) Church? R/O Ray Nummey. Old Man Bernie Hughes who did the Sunday rounds with white gloves. So if you could further the list of names it would be appreciated.

Paul
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Old 30th June 2006, 05:10
Graham Wallace Graham Wallace is offline  
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Venture 1969

Quote:
Originally Posted by paul0510
Morning Roger,
just wondering what your surname is seeing as it is quite possible that we both sailed together on the Venture in '69. I was senior Nav/App. Remember a J/E by the name of Edwards who played guitar. Chief Stewards Ken Moyce and Tommy (TC) Church? R/O Ray Nummey. Old Man Bernie Hughes who did the Sunday rounds with white gloves. So if you could further the list of names it would be appreciated.

Paul
Paul,
Yes he was, but then his seatime info is more detailed than yours, so do you want to bring me up to date? Patrol, Venture, Hero, decidedly thin.

Graham
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Old 1st September 2006, 13:36
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Hello Roger,

You have a marvelous memory, and I think supplemented by your carbon copies of 'Letters to London'?

These letters I always read thoroughly after joining a new ship, as they gave not only a history of the particular problems of that vessels machinery, but also a lesson in themselves of what can happen, in that same way that the reports into marine incidents do (see above 'Bright Field') When I came to do a BSc in systems analysis (mostly) in the 1990's these sort of reports were the main means to be able to analyse how failures happened, but also be able to work out how to help in being able to design out, or at least reduce the odds that they occur again.

I sailed on the Commodore myself in the late seventies (2/E) and had a much more pleasant trip, although we did change an enormous number of main engine liners at sea. This was as a most likely result of the company fitting a fuel homogeniser which supplied 3 units out of the nine, and the other 6 units were supplied with fuel oil that had been centrifugally purified.

Also a late thank you to Roger for giving me a coffee when I visited him in Swansea when I sailed briefly with Trinity House. I think it was the Ensign we sailed together. The worst ships got the best engineers, and then we lost them to head offices! (that's certainly not me, but Roger)

Keith
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Old 4th September 2006, 21:36
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Hi Keith, Good to hear from you, lot of water under the bridge since the Ensign. Yes I do have a few copies of "Letters to London" for ships I was Chief on but not as many as I would like. I can remember incidents more so than people although I do remember you. I have tried to recall as many people as possible from the Ensign and can only come up with yourself, Extra Third Arthur Salmon, Captain Nigel Groves and Junior Chief Malcom Todd. I wonder if you were there when we left Finnart in October 73 and had to hot wash one of the cargo tanks to examine a leaking 4-way pipe(crucifix). Anyway the Butterworth pipe above the main switchboard split and drenched the switchboard in sea water(wonderfull design). This resulted in a complete blackout and even sheared the coupling bolts between the Turbo Alternator gearing/alternator coupling which we had to manufacture new on the ships lathe as we had no spares. I won't give the whole story now as I intend to post it shortly. Suffice to say the Electrician who I can picture but not name did a fantastic job cleaning up the switchboard. Was it Fred Stuart?? I'm impressed with your BSc in systems analysis. Glad to hear you had a better trip on the Commodore than I did. Shortly after that I joined the Centaur which will be the subject of another posting shortly. Had two good trips on her but the first week was hilarious or frightening depending upon your point of view.
Roger
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Old 5th September 2006, 18:24
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Roger,

The guy who made the new fitted coupling bolts between the 'gobbler' low efficiency t/a turbine and gearbox, was a one time neighbour of mine here in South Shields, Paul Fentiman. He had fortunately served his time as a fitter/turner. He is no longer with us as he died last? year in Thailand, having reached his own lifetime's ambition by being the owner operator of a bar and having married a local.

I found this out as I met his first and second wife (same person) recently when I visited the Sunderland National glass centre, she is a receptionist there. He had had a heart attack, but this was the second. After the first he did not stop drinking, smoking and leading a good? life!

Paul lived a fast life, obviously. I was guarantor when he adopted his first (and second) wife's child when they married, to say he was a suitable person. It's a bit late now to find out he might not have been.

I will not steal your thunder on the Ensign story, but await the tale, and may reinforce as well.

Cannot remember the lecky at the moment, will try.

Keith

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Old 9th September 2006, 17:43
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If you gents were on the old 'C' class, do you remember the "you're in trouble" catchphrase from a certain old man?
"It's either MacAlpines way or the highway"

LOL


Incidentally, a new C class is joining the BP fleet at the moment, all LPG tankers. British Confidence, British Commerce, British Councillor and British Courage.
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Old 16th April 2007, 21:25
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I sailed with Joe Beattie on the Progress in 1975. He could certainly hold his whiskey!
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Old 17th April 2007, 11:50
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..remember Joe Beattie well, was Master of the Destiny in '70. Lived on the Tyne and drove a green Audi hatchback I seem to remember, as if anybody was interested ;-)))
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Old 17th April 2007, 12:59
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Perhaps not the technical item as previously related but certainly memorable on a BP Tanker.

I was sailing 5/E on a Shell tanker, the Arianta, back in 1970, and we pulled in to Aden to load white oils for Durban. There was a couple of BP tankers alongside and we went over to one of them to scrounge some tins of Thistlebond, and ended up in the bar, (as you do!!)

There was about six of us ex South Shields Marine College Apprentices, and the chat got round to old girlfriends back in Shields, one young lass was well mentioned, both for her beauty and predilection for marine engineers.

Suddenly the Second Mate jumped up and slammed his pint on the bar and told us to go away ( I think he put shorter than that!) as that was his Fiancee we were yakking about!!

Exit rapidly some redfaced and embarassed Shell Engineers!!
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Old 24th April 2007, 13:41
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Wink Life at sea with BP

Anyone remember those compressed air gun devices that were intended for clearing blockages in the plumbing? You pumped them up by hand , fitted the outlet in to the blocked orifice, then pulled the trigger. Dangerous articles. On the first ship I was on that received one, one of the mates used it to try to clear a blocked toilet, and it cracked the pan into two halves. Later, on one of the VLCCs I got a blockage in my shower drain, so I duly laid hands on "the gun", followed the instructions, and cleared the blockage most effectively. Shortly afterwards met with an irate Chief Steward, who had been innocently taking a shower when a geyser of shitty water erupted from the plug hole, splattering him, his shower cubicle and the deckhead. Must have been the only time anyone came out of a shower dirtier than when they went in.
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Old 24th April 2007, 18:22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hodges View Post
Anyone remember those compressed air gun devices that were intended for clearing blockages in the plumbing?
Talking of compressed air devices, whatever happened to Zwicky pumps? I remember that they were part of the fire fighting equipment on board BP's larger vessels. They had a very loud piercing whine when operating.
Kind regards,
John.

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Old 24th April 2007, 19:08
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Have any of you good BP men read the chippy's lament? If not here it is:

Chippy's lament

To those of you who grunt and groan,
whilst seated on this marble throne
spare a thought or a give a ponder
upon the route your waste will wander
Through paths tortuous it will wind
on bends it will so easily bind
but you know it shoudn’t oughter
if you flush with ample water
so hold the handle for a while
and thus keep chippy’s happy smile
too often has it been his gripe
three inch a..e and two inch pipe.
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Old 25th April 2007, 02:35
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What some fantastic tales and ingenuity .... trust Rick to stick his oar in ... been looking for him .. now I know where he was !!!

Zwicky pumps John? ... yup ... but just at present I am seeing in my memory two types of pumps ... the ones you are talking about were the Air Salvage pumps??? and I can also see another pump on a plank of wood with a lever ... air pump for those bloody Friremans breathing helmets ???

As for the compressed air sani gadget .... what fun!! I remember opening the package when it arrived aboard ... about the same era as Tespa Bandits??? .. and puzzling as top how it worked .... tried it out and blew all sorts of holes on bends which were obviously weak spots in the drainage pipes .... could be they caused more trouble on the older ships than they solved???

I have a picture of one of the 70's in drydock on the Tyne ... I think she was in for pre delivery check up.... must get my colour slides digitally transferred ... anyone got a good system??

Barnsey BP Tankers 1959 - 1974
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Old 25th April 2007, 18:59
John_F John_F is offline
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Barnsey,
You're right - Zwicky = air salvage pumps & bloody noisy things they were too. Never saw one used in anger thankfully.
The other apparatus that you mention was the Siebe Gorman Fireman's helmet - what a contraption that was! The helmet had two little opening glass windows in the front which were inevitably badly scratched & dirty, making it very difficult to see anything at all out of it. The whole thing was very cumbersome what with the canvas clad air pipe leading from the helmet to the hand pump. Unfortunately, I saw someone killed while using this outfit while attempting to rescue a pumpman who had been overcome by fumes at the bottom of the pumproom. It transpired that one of the glass windows in the helmet had cracked, allowing gas to enter the helmet, killing the wearer. Strangely enough, the pumpman who had been overcome survived.
Kind regards,
John.

Last edited by K urgess : 27th January 2008 at 20:04. Reason: colour change
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  #24  
Old 27th January 2008, 20:01
paxmanmerv paxmanmerv is offline  
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superb piece about the Paxmans!
Am restoring one of these, V12YHA, & could do with any tales of good fortune or woe along with hints & tips on the opperation of the beast!
Will be touring some steam rallies in the UK this year with it & would be delighted to chat with anyone who remembers the Paxman engines!
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  #25  
Old 29th January 2008, 19:58
mofnotmuff mofnotmuff is offline  
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How about the one about the deck boy tasked to empty the engine room gash bins, when he got to the control room he found a gash bin full of oil and metal, he duly hauled it up to the poop(no mean feat considering the weight) and dumped it over the side and replaced empty gash bin in control room.

Some time later engineer was seen searching for the bits from the lifeboat engine he had left to soak in oil. Bosun and chief agreed deck boy not at fault - gash bins for gash only!
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