What does this mean?

wightspirit
12th February 2015, 13:43
I'm going through a crew list for a ship lost in 1918 and there's something in one of the entries I don't understand. The ship's cook's details are recorded, and under column 8 in the crew agreement it says, 'In what capacity engaged, No. of certificate (if any) and No. of Reserve Commission or R.V. 2 (if any).' The entry says, 'Ship's Cook, 6799.'

The questions are: Were ship's cooks issued with some form of cookery certificate (to which 6799 refers); and what does Reserve Commission or RV2 mean?

Can anyone enlighten me please?

Dave W

Scelerat
12th February 2015, 13:50
It's a description to cover all seafarers, so includes those with and without tickets, and the possibility that the person might be RNR.

Hugh MacLean
12th February 2015, 18:55
Hello Dave,
Scelerat is on the right line. The R.V.2 is the " Certificate of Enrolment'' in the Royal Naval Reserve, i.e. his RNR official number. However, if no RV2 number shown then he wasn't RNR.

The number next to the Ship's Cook entry will be a certificate of competency for something. It could be for various things, for example, if he was a merchant seaman gunner he would have one and would assist the DAMS gunners (note* DAMS for WW1 and DEMS for WW2).
Regards
Hugh

Varley
12th February 2015, 22:57
I thought it was required of vessels over a certain size or SOB to have a cook's certificate onboard. Isn't that what it is. Especially as he was the cook.

(Perhaps not SOB but specifically crew. Feed and house the cargo as you like, and of course, so they are likely to book with you again).

wightspirit
13th February 2015, 10:02
Gents - thank you all for your replies. My man could well have been RNR so I'll check further.

Dave W

ALAN TYLER
14th February 2015, 14:25
I was awarded my Ships Cooks, Certificate of Competency in Cooking granted under Section 27 of the Merchant shipping Act, 1906 ( Edw. 7 Cap. 48.) This was after a six week course at the Nautical Catering College in Liverpool in March 1968. I was also under the impression a ship couldn,t sail without a cooks ticket on board.