Idiot,s

narra
5th March 2015, 22:59
I was on one of the O boats I think the ORONSAY inSydney loading butter .it was coming up the escalator when one got stuck at the top and stop the donkey engine .Ilifted the box of butter off,and all the dockers went on strike,Inthe end to get them back to work.the Sec/stew had. To take me into Sydney to the Union Offices to apologise .before they would go back to work.Narra(Frogger)(Frogger)

ben27
5th March 2015, 23:18
good day narra.sm,today.08:59.re: idiot's,and they wonder where our merchant navy went,(idiots as unions)great post,regards ben27

narra
6th March 2015, 19:06
Thanks Ben27.O for the old days we can but dream.Narra

Kaiser Bill
6th March 2015, 19:59
I was on one of the O boats I think the ORONSAY inSydney loading butter .it was coming up the escalator when one got stuck at the top and stop the donkey engine .Ilifted the box of butter off,and all the dockers went on strike,Inthe end to get them back to work.the Sec/stew had. To take me into Sydney to the Union Offices to apologise .before they would go back to work.Narra(Frogger)(Frogger) Ah, the good old days. You have to admit it was interesting times. (Jester)

ben27
7th March 2015, 00:30
good day narra,sm,today 05:06.#3.re:idiot,s.thank you for your reply.yes they were good old days.regards ben27

NoR
7th March 2015, 08:46
In an airline I worked for a pilot caught baggage handers rifling baggage in the hold. He reported them but was later made to give a grovelling apology. Such was the union power.

Basil
7th March 2015, 13:36
a pilot caught baggage handers rifling baggage in the hold
Thiefrow?
They didn't like flight crew looking in the hold during walkround inspection.
Received their comeuppance when they tried to stop a well known airline from operating, missing the point that they'd upset so many other staff and THEIR union officers that no one objected to company volunteers loading the baggage.

Les Gibson
7th March 2015, 14:27
When working for a well known aerospace company in Bristol a fellow superintendent was checking on 2 painters who were spending a lot of time off sick. They were classed as 'staff' so were paid as long as they produced a doctors certificate. The super went into a house where these 2 were painting during working hours of course (daylighting as opposed to moonlighting?) and reported them back to our head of department. The union got wind that these 2 were about to be sacked and had the house owner threaten the superintendent with trespass if they were sacked! The outcome was, superintendent had to apologise to the 2 wasters who were actually defrauding the company!

canadian
7th March 2015, 17:11
When I was in Australia my experience of the union was different,
(although blinkered) We were employed on our own ships with their
permission provided the wage was on par with theirs.in the evenings
we would prepare the holds for freezing for Lamb and butter the wage
being triple of ships wages. In the 70s/80s,I was a shop steward never
asked for anything that was not in our agreements, As a matter of fact
when the management wanted something outside the agreements they locked
us out until we conceded. all experiences are different.

narra
7th March 2015, 17:14
Hi R651400. Not a word,Told To just get on with it can't remember who was in charge guess they had slid off for a crafty smoke. They soon put a notice up warning us. Narra. Thanks to the lads for there posts.

tsell
7th March 2015, 20:52
Between ships, I worked on the wharf as a 'seagull' in New Plymouth, NZ in the '50s', loading frozen lamb carcasses. It was well known that there were few with kidneys when unloaded in the UK.
One morning smoko a third mate stopped a wharfie heading for the gangway and insisted he check his bag. After an argument, the na´ve third snatches the bag and turning it upside down tipped out the contents - kidneys.
I watched as the drama unfolded with the wharfie screamed blue murder, "All out! All out!
Everything stopped, men came up from below, cargo stayed where it was, even slings of suspended carcasses, in the hot sun.
We were ordered ashore to the smoko shed, where crates of beer were supplied while actions were determined.
I recall that it went on for some days, while the wharfies were on full pay, but I ended up with nothing, as I was dumped on the first day of the strike, along with other seagulls.
Ironically, it was the same week that a union chief - one Syd Flood as I recall - was charged with embezzling union funds.
Any Kiwi members recall these events?

Taff