Nellists Nautical School Newcastle

George.GM
16th July 2015, 15:47
Anyone remember Nellists?
Billie and Jackie Nellist were the best teachers of
the requirements for 2nd Mate, Mate and Master in
the country - probably the world
I did the first two there in the late 50's early 60's
but the school closed then and I had to do Master
in Warsash. Not the same at all.!

sidsal
16th July 2015, 17:06
I did 2nd Mates therein 1946. As you say they had the best record of getting chaps pass.
Great time in Newcastle too

kevhogg
16th July 2015, 17:08
I believe neither of them ever went to sea as well

vinnie05
17th July 2015, 09:34
Nice to read some comments about Nellists school in Newcastle. My late father attended the school for his second mates ticket in 1930. As far as I know he took the rest including master at their school. After we returned from Canada, where my father had ran a navigation school for fishermen in Nova Scotia, he gave some lessons part-time at Nellists in the late fifties.

sidsal
17th July 2015, 20:57
One of the things Nellists did was to get the candidates to tell them what questions they had been asked, for instance in the Orals. They then told the ones yet to take the exams what to expect from different examiners and what questions were likely in the exams.
They told me, for instance that I would be given a sextant and asked to measure the horizontal angle between a certain chimney and a church steeple from the window of the examination room. They said it was 67 degrees 29 mnutes !!
They also taught you not to waffle and how to answer sensibly the questions asked.
Great brothers !

George.GM
18th July 2015, 09:46
Remember that well Sidsal. We had to write the oral questions in a big book with the name of the examiner and the time taken.
When I tried to introduce this system at Warsash when up for Master I was told that "we are here to give you a broad education not to teach you the answers to the questions of individual examiners"
I didn't want a broad education - just a ticket.

dcm1963
3rd July 2018, 11:34
I took 2nd Mates at Nellist in 1958 and Mates in 1960. They were fantastic teachers. Billy always wore slippers as he had bad feet. Jackie was a nicer guy and was very knowledgable about everything really.

Winmar
6th July 2018, 04:42
Remember that well Sidsal. We had to write the oral questions in a big book with the name of the examiner and the time taken.
When I tried to introduce this system at Warsash when up for Master I was told that "we are here to give you a broad education not to teach you the answers to the questions of individual examiners"
I didn't want a broad education - just a ticket.

Took all mine at Warsash beginning with 2nd mates in 1979. Warsash held Oral's books for all levels then. When you completed your Orals you were asked pass or fail to right down everything you were asked, the examiners name and the time taken. They did an analysis from time to time and the created lists of "old chestnuts" for each examiner. Captains Turnbull, Le Vogler, Hunt, Harwood and Owen were the nautical examiners during my exam era. Turnbull, Le Vogler and Owen had fierce reputations. Captains Hunt and Harwood were two quiet spoken gentlemen who probably asked you more questions than the other three put together but it was done in a "fatherly chat manner". Orals days were probably both the best and worse days of your young life. You basically crapped yourself in the run up and throughout the exam and then the feeling of total elation when they said the magic words, " I will pass you" was indescribable. Anyway, I digress, I think they probably did take notice of you George and others and I am glad they did as those Orals files played a large part in getting this fella tickets and a career!

Ian Lawson
6th July 2018, 10:00
There were many nautical examiners who had fierce reputations in the 60's. I would suggest Capt. Fletcher, Liverpool, was the one whose name put the greatest fear into a young candidate.There was no way you could passed him unless you knew your stuff.

dcm1963
6th July 2018, 10:18
I took 2nd Mates at Nellist in 1958 and Mates in 1960. They were fantastic teachers. Billy always wore slippers as he had bad feet. Jackie was a nicer guy and was very knowledgable about everything really.

I had Turnbull for Mates orals and he chucked me out for not knowing the fire regs. I ought to have known. I went back and Jackie gave me a quick run through with what I had neglected to learn and I went back in the afternoon and passed. I had a really nice guy for 2nd mates who spent half an hour telling me about the workings of chronometers. Can't remember his name. I think I impressed him with my 'hows she heading' knowledge. My pal and I spent more time at the RVI and the (A)nurses home on Framlington Place than we should. parties every weekend which often lasted 3 days. Took Masters in NZ and it was just not the same but by then I wasmarriedwithfamily.https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/images/smilies/angel2.gif

Winmar
6th July 2018, 10:35
There were many nautical examiners who had fierce reputations in the 60's. I would suggest Capt. Fletcher, Liverpool, was the one whose name put the greatest fear into a young candidate.There was no way you could passed him unless you knew your stuff.

Hi Ian,
Capt Fletcher's name and reputation certainly travelled throughout the system as did Capt "Charlie" Distin at Hull. It is a legend I have heard many times but I believe that Charlie was the one who said the following first. When just about to issue more sea time he asked the quivering candidate to look out of the exam window, then asked him what colour the leaves on the trees were. The lad said Green sir to which Charlie allegedly said, Come back when they are brown!! Outtttt!

Winmar
6th July 2018, 10:50
I had Turnbull for Mates orals and he chucked me out for not knowing the fire regs. I ought to have known. I went back and Jackie gave me a quick run through with what I had neglected to learn and I went back in the afternoon and passed. I had a really nice guy for 2nd mates who spent half an hour telling me about the workings of chronometers. Can't remember his name. I think I impressed him with my 'hows she heading' knowledge. My pal and I spent more time at the RVI and the (A)nurses home on Framlington Place than we should. parties every weekend which often lasted 3 days. Took Masters in NZ and it was just not the same but by then I was married with family.https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/images/smilies/angel2.gif

Captain Turnbull arrived at Southampton in the Autumn term 1976. We were doing Lifeboat and EDH courses. His first exam in Southampton district was the lifeboat exam for our years cadets. Nobody at the college knew him or his history. There were 43 cadets across the year. Two PASSED and he failed 41 in a day saying I will come back when they are ready. Fortunately, I was one of the lucky two and I say lucky. The good Captain threw the lad before me out of the exam because he "killed" the dummy during the Williamson's turn and rescue, I went next and managed not to "Kill" the dummy so he said "Good" and passed me. Apparently, when at sea he had to take to the boats and it was one of his pet subjects. I think he was making a point because one of the lecturers told him that they always did the theory before the practical. Capt Turnbull exclaimed that there was no point doing the theory if they couldn't apply common sense in the boat. If you have ever heard, 43 oh sh*ts at the same time you have never lived. Two weeks later he returned, the college had everyone standing on the pier, he asked to do the theory first and we got 41 passes. Fortunately that was my one and only experience of him. I had Capt Hunt for 2nd Mates, Le Vogler(Specialist subject, fishing boats) and Capt Simon Harwood for masters. The Capt Le Vogler exam is worth another story all on its own, for another day!