Ss Armagh

al1934
11th August 2007, 12:06
I am searching for any data, tonnage, etc on SS ARMAGH built 1917 owned by Union Steamship Company of New Zealand Ltd. She ran aground in Mersey 1923 was later cut up. I have a friend who does not have access to the internet, who is researching the ship.

Any assistance will be appreciated.

Bruce Carson
11th August 2007, 12:24
There are some details at the following URL:

perso.orange.fr/cdasm.56/dictionnaire/047.pdf

A picture of the wreck here:

http://www.merseysideviews.com/Ship%20Wrecks/pages/Wks%2003.htm

Bruce C

K urgess
11th August 2007, 12:28
Welcome aboard from East Yorkshire.
I'm sure it won't be long before you get some answers meanwhile you may be able to find some yourself by searching the forum.

al1934
11th August 2007, 12:30
Thanks, Bruce.

Much appreciated - and so prompt!!!

Alick

gdynia
11th August 2007, 12:41
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage

Bruce Carson
11th August 2007, 12:50
Welcome onboard, Alick.

I'm curious about the 'Armagh'.
She is listed as being over 12,000GT, but I don't find any reference to her carrying passengers. That tonnage was huge for a purely cargo ship at that time.
And I wonder in what service she was running for the Union Company?

Bruce C

exsailor
11th August 2007, 13:38
Armagh, 12269 grt.
To gain a foothold in the NZ-UK trade, USSCo purchased Houlder Bros. service in 1912, acquiring 'Rippingham Grange', 'Oswestry Grange', 'Drayton Grange', 'Everton Grange'. In 1912, Rippingham was renamed 'Limerick', Drayton became 'Tyrone', both under NZ Shipping Co operation, and were joined by USSCo new built 'Leitrim' (9540 grt/1916) and 'Armagh' (12269 grt/1917) to form the 'Four Counties Service'.

Dennis.

Bruce Carson
11th August 2007, 13:47
Dennis, thanks.
That really takes care of my questions.
I had seen the information on the 'Granges' but didn't know of the
'Leitrim' or 'Armagh'.

Bruce

al1934
11th August 2007, 14:13
Thank you all for your welcomes and for the infomation. I'm glad I joined this knowledgeable vessel!

Alick

R58484956
11th August 2007, 19:08
A belated welcome from a member in the south of England. Enjoy the site and bon voyage.

al1934
14th August 2007, 12:36
On behalf of my friend, who does not have access to the internet and who is researching the ARMAGH, many thanks for all the kind assistance.

He tells me that ARMAGH and her sister ship NORTHUMBERLAND shared the honour of being the largest vessels ever to transit the entire length of the Manchester Ship Canal. He says that there are many photos of NORTHUMBERLAND in the canal but he cannot trace any of ARMAGH actually transitting. I have been everywhere using ARMAGH in Google and cannot find any. Does anyone know where else I could look?

gdynia
14th August 2007, 13:12
Armagh was built on River Tyne by Swan Hunters Wallsend. Launched on 23.04.1917 . She was wrecked on Taylors Bank, Mersey on 15.12.1923

zsimone
19th August 2007, 02:09
Hi,
Armagh
1917 Built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson of Newcastle.
Grt 12,269 Net 7878 Length 530.5 Ft Beam 63Ft Draft 39.912 Ft Powered by Twin Screw 4 Steam Turbines geared to 2 shafts 8 single Boilers 190 PSI by Wallsend Slipway Co of Newcastle.

She was delivered as Armagh to the U.S.S.Co of N.Z. Ltd and was an Irish Counties Ship for the frozen meat trade to the U.K. Her sister ship being the Federal Line Vessel Northumberland.

1919 In May of this year she entered for the first time in this trade for the U.S.S.co

1923 on the 15th December whilst leaving the Mersey outward bound for Brisbane she stranded on Taylors Bank revetment at the mouth of the Mersey and broke her back She was declared a total Constructive Loss.

http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/5536/armagh12269grt19171923rd6.jpg

Cheers
Gary

al1934
19th August 2007, 10:42
Many thanks gdynia and Gary for all the information.

That is a particularly fine photo on imageshack, Gary. I have googled this ship many times but it didn't come up with anything like this one. How did you ever find it? Are you an imageshack member? I might well join it if this is an example of the quality there.

My friend will be overjoyed! He ran his own small boat ferry across the Manchester Ship Canal when he was young, which was very popular and earned him pocket money. Before private enterprise was deemed politically incorrect...

zsimone
20th August 2007, 00:16
hi al1934

I am glad you like the photo. I have this one in my collection and only use image shack to place it on the forum.
Cheers
Gary

melliget
22nd August 2007, 13:29
Hi.

Here's a newspaper report of the Armagh's demise.

The Times
Mon, 17 Dec 1923
STEAMER AGROUND IN THE MERSEY
PASSENGERS AND CREW RESCUED
Liverpool, Dec. 16

The steamer Armagh, 12,000 tons, belonging
to the Union Steamship Company, New
Zealand, came to grief in the Mersey channel
on Saturday evening. The Armagh, heavily
laden, was outward bound for Adelaide with
a crew of 99 and three passengers - a man
and his wife and child. Four stowaways were
also on board.
By some unexplained means, although the
weather was clear, the vessel went aground
on the revetment, a submerged wall running
alongside the channel, and laid down some
years ago by the Mersey Docks and Harbour
Board with the object of regulating the flow
of the tide and preventing silting by sand.
The mishap occurred at 5.10, and it can only
be presumed that in the darkness and with
the tide ebbing strongly the captain of the
Armagh mistook his course. The vessel glided
gently on to the revetment wall and stuck
fast. Signals of distress were sent up.
The New Brighton lifeboat and several tug-
boats speedily arrived. After some difficulty
the passengers were transferred to lifeboats.
It was soon apparent that with the continued
fall of the tide, and owing to the heavily-
laden condition of the steamer, it would be
impossible to save the Armagh. The crew
and the stowaways were got on board the
lifeboat, but before this was completed the
vessel had broken in two, but without sink-
ing.
Meanwhile, those remaining on the vessel
gathered on the forecastle peak and sang
songs until taken off by the lifeboat, about
half-past 1 on Sunday morning. There was
no panic. The rescued party were afterwards
transferred to the Dock Board tender Vigilant
and brought to Liverpool landing-stage. The
crew found accommodation at the Sailors'
Home.

There's another article in The Times with further details. If you're interested, I can send you a copy.

regards,
Martin

al1934
22nd August 2007, 17:04
Thanks very much, Martin

Yes please, I'll be grateful for whatever you have on her.

Best wishes

Alick

melliget
22nd August 2007, 23:25
Alick.

Here are two more on the sinking (the first link is just the one I transcribed earlier today - better to have the newsprint version).

TheTimes_17Dec1923_Steamer_Aground_In_The_Mersey.p ng (http://tinyurl.com/yqm3u4)
TheTimes_18Dec1923_Steamers_Back_Broken.png (http://tinyurl.com/yr4cuc)
TheTimes_18Dec1923_Wreck_Of_The_Armagh.png (http://tinyurl.com/2oxw9j)

regards,
Martin

al1934
23rd August 2007, 14:31
Many thanks, Martin

I am most grateful to you

Best wishes

Alick

sam Prowting
3rd July 2012, 11:04
I am searching for any data, tonnage, etc on SS ARMAGH built 1917 owned by Union Steamship Company of New Zealand Ltd. She ran aground in Mersey 1923 was later cut up. I have a friend who does not have access to the internet, who is researching the ship.

Any assistance will be appreciated.

My father was senior 5th engineer on the Armagh and according to his discharge book her official number was 140369 London, tonnage 7878, and in 1918 she was trooping from the USA. That is all I have. Regards Sam Prowting.

al1934
3rd July 2012, 16:12
My father was senior 5th engineer on the Armagh and according to his discharge book her official number was 140369 London, tonnage 7878, and in 1918 she was trooping from the USA. That is all I have. Regards Sam Prowting.

Many thanks, Sam. Much appreciated.

Best wishes