Mock Turtle Soup

kevjacko
14th February 2016, 09:30
Remember that one lads ?
How did you do yours? I saw so many variations on a theme.
Never hear of it now though.

Varley
14th February 2016, 09:48
I have always wondered about that too. I must have been told once but the other ear must have allowed it out.

Pete D Pirate
14th February 2016, 09:55
Hey, kevjacko,
Frankly, I'm surprised that you're still around to talk about having eaten something like that.
I don't think I'll be visiting this thread again - umph, ummphh, ('scuse me) uummpphhh....

Erimus
14th February 2016, 09:55
Heinz used to make a luxury line of it in the 60's..more expensive than the oxtail or tomato that I took fishing with me.....remember asking Grandma what went into it and was told sheep's brains and any other bits they could find....put me off for life!

geoff

Dartskipper
14th February 2016, 09:56
I was always told it was impolite to mock anybody, including turtles. (Jester)

Varley
14th February 2016, 10:37
Heinz used to make a luxury line of it in the 60's..more expensive than the oxtail or tomato that I took fishing with me.....remember asking Grandma what went into it and was told sheep's brains and any other bits they could find....put me off for life!

geoff

And now it has me, for the rest of it anyway!

Erimus
14th February 2016, 10:44
I was always told it was impolite to mock anybody, including turtles. (Jester)

Makes 'em shellshocked doesn't it!


geoff

kevjacko
14th February 2016, 11:12
I avoided putting it on menus, along with Brown Windsor. The origins were always murky to say the least often depending on what Doc had lurking down the fridge flat from previous day(s) leftovers, Chuck in a bit of offal, owt would do, and Bob's yer uncle. Much the same as Brown Windsor, I've seen yesterday's Gravy, knocked back with a bit of Engineers stock, with a bit of veg chucked in.

Dartskipper
14th February 2016, 12:42
Makes 'em shellshocked doesn't it!


geoff

I was going to make an offal pun about left overs making a right stew, but thought batter of it. (Thumb)

Roy.

Dickyboy
14th February 2016, 14:14
I don't recall having been served Mock Turtle Soup while at sea, but I do seem to recall a tinned variety in the 1950s Possibly that was derived from a wartime recipe. Never saw the ingredients, but always thought there was lamb/mutton or whatever in it. I liked it.

Farmer John
14th February 2016, 17:07
I think that it was made from Calves' head at one time, and that is why Tenniel drew the mock turtle with a calf's head in "Alice in Wonderland".

John Rogers
14th February 2016, 17:54
Mock turtle soup is an English soup that was created in the mid-18th century as a cheaper imitation of green turtle soup.[1] It often uses brains and organ meats such as calf's head or a calf's foot[2] to duplicate the texture and flavour of the original's turtle meat.


Mrs. Fowle's Mock Turtle Soup:

Take a large calf's head. Scald off the hair. Boil it until the horn is tender, then cut it into slices about the size of your finger, with as little lean as possible. Have ready three pints of good mutton or veal broth, put in it half a pint of Madeira wine, half a teaspoonful of thyme, pepper, a large onion, and the peel of a lemon chop't very small. A of a pint of oysters chop't very small, and their liquor; a little salt, the juice of two large onions, some sweet herbs, and the brains chop't. Stand all these together for about an hour, and send it up to the table with the forcemeat balls made small and the yolks of hard eggs.[3]

Erimus
14th February 2016, 18:52
I was going to make an offal pun about left overs making a right stew, but thought batter of it. (Thumb)

Roy.


Liver and let die perhaps...

geoff

Ron Dean
14th February 2016, 18:59
Mock turtle soup is an English soup that was created in the mid-18th century as a cheaper imitation of green turtle soup.[1] It often uses brains and organ meats such as calf's head or a calf's foot[2] to duplicate the texture and flavour of the original's turtle meat.


Mrs. Fowle's Mock Turtle Soup:

Take a large calf's head. Scald off the hair. Boil it until the horn is tender, then cut it into slices about the size of your finger, with as little lean as possible. Have ready three pints of good mutton or veal broth, put in it half a pint of Madeira wine, half a teaspoonful of thyme, pepper, a large onion, and the peel of a lemon chop't very small. A of a pint of oysters chop't very small, and their liquor; a little salt, the juice of two large onions, some sweet herbs, and the brains chop't. Stand all these together for about an hour, and send it up to the table with the forcemeat balls made small and the yolks of hard eggs.[3]
When Mother was in her 90's, she went to the annual "Pensioners Christmas party".
She told me the "starter" on the menu was "real mock turtle soup", I'm guessing it could been one of those John.
As an aside, she also told me that she was on antibionics at the time. (Ouch)

Ron.

Samsette
14th February 2016, 20:07
That Mrs. Fowles must have been a real mad old cow. The Madeira wine part of her soup is acceptable. In fact, I'd have boiled the calf's head and thrown it to the neighbourhood dogs, drank a liter of the wine and then I might have been able to face the rest of it. No wonder Indian food has taken off in the UK.

Dickyboy
14th February 2016, 21:41
Actually Mrs Fowlers recipe looks okay to me. Not what we would eat today of course, but it looks like it would have been highly nutritious. Made to todays hygiene standards, I'd give it a go.

Dartskipper
14th February 2016, 21:50
Actually Mrs Fowlers recipe looks okay to me. Not what we would eat today of course, but it looks like it would have been highly nutritious. Made to todays hygiene standards, I'd give it a go.

You must be feeling a lot better Dickyboy! Welcome back.(Thumb)

Personally, for an inexpensive wholesome soup to help ward off winter chills and colds, you can't beat good old chicken soup, made from a stock rendered down from boiling a carcass.

Roy.

Dickyboy
14th February 2016, 22:45
You must be feeling a lot better Dickyboy! Welcome back.(Thumb)

Personally, for an inexpensive wholesome soup to help ward off winter chills and colds, you can't beat good old chicken soup, made from a stock rendered down from boiling a carcass.

Roy.

Actually I am just starting to feel a little better Roy. I can actually walk across a room. Believe me that's an improvement. :)
As for the soup, I'll try anything once.

Varley
14th February 2016, 23:38
As long as you avoid incest and country dancing!

Sister Eleff
14th February 2016, 23:48
Mrs. Fowle's Mock Turtle Soup:

Take a large calf's head.

You lost me at that point (EEK)

Keltic Star
15th February 2016, 07:01
Mock turtle soup is an English soup that was created in the mid-18th century as a cheaper imitation of green turtle soup.[1] It often uses brains and organ meats such as calf's head or a calf's foot[2] to duplicate the texture and flavour of the original's turtle meat.


Mrs. Fowle's Mock Turtle Soup:

Take a large calf's head. Scald off the hair. Boil it until the horn is tender, then cut it into slices about the size of your finger, with as little lean as possible. Have ready three pints of good mutton or veal broth, put in it half a pint of Madeira wine, half a teaspoonful of thyme, pepper, a large onion, and the peel of a lemon chop't very small. A of a pint of oysters chop't very small, and their liquor; a little salt, the juice of two large onions, some sweet herbs, and the brains chop't. Stand all these together for about an hour, and send it up to the table with the forcemeat balls made small and the yolks of hard eggs.[3]

Did I really eat that sh1t on Prince Line ships?

TOM ALEXANDER
15th February 2016, 07:04
Personally, for an inexpensive wholesome soup to help ward off winter chills and colds, you can't beat good old chicken soup, made from a stock rendered down from boiling a carcass. Roy.

Ah! Nothing like a nice hot bowl of Jewish penecillin! B\)

Ray Mac
15th February 2016, 09:44
Remember that one lads ?
How did you do yours? I saw so many variations on a theme.
Never hear of it now though.

Maggi soup mix Kevin used to make mock turtle(Smoke)

Ray

kevjacko
15th February 2016, 09:58
Maggi soup mix Kevin used to make mock turtle(Smoke)

Ray

On BP ships I remember carrying Maggi' s tomato,mushroom, chicken, and chicken noodle.
I'd try and avoid using if I could preferring fresh.

William Clark8
15th February 2016, 11:33
Did you grow your Mushrooms on the 'POOP' deck?
(==D)(==D)

john blythe
15th February 2016, 12:20
Mock turtle what blast from the past, so many ways of doing it. And if you were lucky a splash of sherry pending on what company you were working for.

Dickyboy
15th February 2016, 12:22
Could almost be called Brawn soup I suppose.......
My mum used to make Brawn.

ALAN TYLER
15th February 2016, 14:13
Board of Trade cookbook recipe for Mock Turtle soup....1lb Preserved tinned meat, 4oz carrots onions, turnip, 2oz brown flour 1oz fat, 1teaspoon herbs, celery seeds lemon juice 2 tomatoes pepper & salt, forcemeat balls and 4 pints of no2 stock.
Peel and cut up veg and braise off in hot fat, add flour and cook for 5 mins gradually adding stock then put in the meat herbs celery and tomatoes, cook for 1 hour. Then pass through a sieve add lemon juice and seasoning and forcemeat balls, reheat and serve. Enjoy.
Personally can never remember making it like that and don,t ask!!

kevjacko
15th February 2016, 16:21
Did you grow your Mushrooms on the 'POOP' deck?
(==D)(==D)

No I kept them in the dark and fed them bullshit same as the company used to do to us.(Jester)(Jester)

john blythe
16th February 2016, 19:11
Nice one Kevjacko I can still smell the bullshit some times, and it still rings in my ears

sidsal
17th February 2016, 14:48
In the ancient ships I sailed in (1917 built mostly , with no refrigeration or running water the food was lousy. The puddings I remember well - College Pudding, Black cap pudding, Victoria Pudding etc - they were all the same ingredients. The only difference was the lack of, or distribution of, the few currants. It was said that the distribution of the currants depended on how high up the funnel ladder the cook went before chucking a handful of currants through the galley skylight.

slick
17th February 2016, 16:19
All,
Many a Chief Steward's reputation was saved by putting Treacle Duff on twice in the last week before pay off in the UK.
Of Mock Turtle, it was the carrots I remember the rest of the ingredients I'd rather not know about.
On some (most) of Hains there was never any salad dressing etc, so Vinegar and Olive Oil were mixed in one's dessert spoon at the table, I still have been known to do it at home, after a couple of weeks salad disappeared and was replaced by that favourite Sliced Beetroot and Onions....

Yours aye,

slick

John Rogers
17th February 2016, 16:42
The word Forcemeat gives me the weird feeling,better if they said ground meat,
I just love onions. And beets.