Lynton Grange 1912

Agatha
4th November 2007, 11:02
Hi
I'm doing my family history and am seeking a photo of the first LYNTON GRANGE built in 1912 as a family member was a crew member on the ship in 1913.
This ship was scrapped in 1933.
Have seen photos of the second Lynton Grange torpedoed in 1942 - not the one I want. Cannot find anything on numerous nautical websites.
ANY HELP would be appreciated.

Thanks
Agatha

K urgess
4th November 2007, 11:43
Welcome aboard from northern England, Agatha.
I moved your post into the hello forum where more of our photo collectors who are not necessarily going to look in Houlder Brothers will see it.
You'll probably get a better response.
Find your way around and enjoy the voyage.

Hugh MacLean
4th November 2007, 14:01
Welcome to SN, Agatha,
http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum/Old%20Ship%20Picture%20Gallery%20K-P/Old%20Ships%20L/slides/Lynton%20Grange-01.jpg

Regards

gdynia
4th November 2007, 14:21
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage

benjidog
4th November 2007, 18:35
Welcome from Lancashire.

I hope you will enjoy the site.

Regards,

Brian

non descript
4th November 2007, 20:07
Agatha, a warm welcome aboard to you; enjoy the site and all it has to offer. It is good to see that you already have a picture, thanks to Hugh. We look forward to more of your postings. Bon Voyage

You may already have all the information at your finger tips, but in case not - Lynton Grange (I) was built by Northumberland Shipbuilding Co., of Newcastle and delivered to Houlders in 1912. She remained in the company until the disastrous freight market of 1932 when she was laid-up and then sold for scrap in late 1932, and broken up in 1933

Agatha
5th November 2007, 01:28
Hi Hugh
Thanks for sending the link re "photoship". I contacted Tony Richardson last week at that site and he was unable to confirm this photo is the first Lynton Grange. They have 2 photos on their website and he thinks they are both the 1937 vessel. If you are sure this is the 1912 vessel that'll be great news!
Thanks to all for responding.

Regards
Agatha

Bruce Carson
5th November 2007, 02:14
Agatha, the photo is of the later ship.
The vessel you are looking for, being built in 1912, would almost certainly have a vertical bow and a counter stern.

Bruce

billyboy
5th November 2007, 06:30
Welcome aboard Agatha. Enjoy all this great site has to offer

non descript
5th November 2007, 07:47
As has been pointed out, the one picture is indeed Lynton Grange (II) which, in passing, was lost on en route from Swansea to Capetown & Middle East, with military equipment, incl. 3,000 tons high explosives. She was Torpedoed by U-406 (Lt. Cdr. Dieterichs) at 2120; sunk by U-628 at 2155 on 28 December 1942, in position: 43.23N 27.14W, in mid-Atlantic. There were no casualties and the 52 survivors were rescued by HMS Milne.
All we have to do now is find a picture of the first Lynton Grange

Agatha
5th November 2007, 09:53
Hi Guys
Thanks for the input so far. Especially to Bruce for his technical info re the style of the ship.
Hopefully with all the experts on board someone will come up with a photo of the first Lynton Grange!

Cheers
Agatha

gdynia
5th November 2007, 10:08
Agatha

Check out the following http://www.findmypast.com/passengerListBrowseByShipYear.action?shipName=LYNT ON%20GRANGE&shipNameQualifier=

Also http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.gordonmumford.com/images/Toward4.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.gordonmumford.com/ons154-1.htm&h=293&w=571&sz=97&hl=en&start=3&tbnid=_GJ1o1soBYbWbM:&tbnh=69&tbnw=134&prev=/images%3Fq%3DMerchant%2BShip%2BLynton%2BGrange%26g bv%3D2%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive%26sa %3DG

I think this is the ship you are looking for

non descript
5th November 2007, 10:21
Neville, Well done Sir (Applause)

Here it is courtesy of Mr Gordon Mumford

(Thumb)
Mark

ps. The only problem is that after a second look, I rather fear this is Lynton Grange (II) and not the one we need....

Bother, back to the drawing board...

Bruce Carson
5th November 2007, 12:31
There was an identical ship, built in the same year by the same builders and measuring the same in tonnage, the 'Denby Grange'.
4,252GT, 380' x 49', 3exp, single screw
Sunk by collision on October 24, 1918 on a voyage from Newport to Spezia with a cargo of coal.
Perhaps someone may have or find a picture of the above, which would at least show the Lynton Grange's general likeness.
Agatha, I was remiss in my first posting as I didn't welcome you to Ships Nostalgia.
I do that now and hope you enjoy our site and all its many features.

Welcome onboard,
Bruce

Hugh MacLean
5th November 2007, 16:55
Sorry for putting you on the wrong road, Agatha, the two ships are, I think ,one and the same, although the one I mentioned looks slightly different but this is probably because it is a night time shot. The second photo on that site is without doubt the 1937 built ship.

Thanks, Bruce for pointing that out. (Thumb)

If nobody can come up with the goods - and I wouldnt bet against anyone on this site - there is one for sale at the National Maritime Museum at this link here: http://www.nmm.ac.uk/cgi-bin/empower?DB=ShipsPlansAndPhotos just put LYNTON GRANGE into the search box, the downside is this museum is quite expensive and a photo will cost you around about 20 UK.

non descript
5th November 2007, 22:14
That looks very promising Hugh; in the meantime the best I can come up with is an image if the sister ship - Natal Transport.

Good luck with the National Maritime Museum

(Thumb)
Mark

Agatha
5th November 2007, 23:34
Thanks once again to all you helpful people! I'll check out the links from gdynia.
I contacted the NMM at Greenwich about 10 days and Photo Sales Administrator couldn't confirm their Lynton Grange photo is the 1912 vessel although the reference number ending in 1912 sounds promising. Waiting for Plans and Photos dept at NMM to respond to me.
Hugh, as you say 20 pounds for a photo is expensive - especially when converted to Oz dollars!

Regards
Agatha

Agatha
8th November 2007, 12:00
Hi
Does anyone have access to the book "One Hundred Years of Houlders 1849-1950"?
Author Edward F Stevens
It apparently has illustrations and photos - hopefully it contains photo of Lynton Grange 1912 vessel.

Thanks & regards
Agatha

marinero
8th November 2007, 12:37
Hi
Does anyone have access to the book "One Hundred Years of Houlders 1849-1950"?
Author Edward F Stevens
It apparently has illustrations and photos - hopefully it contains photo of Lynton Grange 1912 vessel.

Thanks & regards
Agatha

Good Morning Agatha.
I have a copy of the aforementioned book but I am afraid it has no picture of the ship your are seeking. I have also checked other books I have regarding the ships of Houlder Bros. but alas to no avail.
Keep searching.
Regards
(Thumb)

Agatha
9th November 2007, 07:03
Hi Marinero
Thanks for looking in your Houlders books. I have surfed (or sailed?) the net for the past several weeks looking for a photo but as I am also of the tenacious Bulldog Breed I'm not giving up!

Cheers
Agatha

K urgess
9th November 2007, 20:48
Agatha,
Just found this in an old book. Not very clear I'm afraid. It's a poorly printed pre war book.

The caption reads -

"One of many vessels stopped by the German cruiser Dresden and later released was the Lynton Grange. On August 6, 1914, she met the German raider off the Brazilian coast. A vessel of 4,252 tons gross, the Lynton Grange was built in 1912 at Newcastle-on-Tyne. She had a length of 380 feet, a beam of 49ft. 1in. and a depth of 26ft. 5in."
From Shipping Wonders of the World, Volume IV, published in the late 1930s

Hope this is the right one.
Cheers
Kris

Bruce Carson
9th November 2007, 20:59
That's a winner, Kris.
I was beginning to think we were looking for a phantom ship.

Bruce

Agatha
9th November 2007, 23:46
Thank you Kris! At last the elusive Lynton Grange. Old books are such a treasure trove.
Bruce, I have my ancestor's Certificate of Discharge for this ship so at least I knew it's not a phantom ship, although I was beginning to wonder..........

Cheers
Agatha

non descript
10th November 2007, 16:56
Hope this is the right one.
Cheers
Kris


Kris,
You are a Star - I might even say a Southern Cross (Jester)
The very one we wanted.
Well done Sir
(Thumb)
Mark