Atlas Steamship Company

Marti Forwood
14th October 2008, 10:29
Morning all and hello from another new member ! Am researching the steamship companies - particulalrly the Atlas Steamship Company - run by my great grandfather Sir William Forwood. Have tracked down most of the ships of the Atlas but cannot place the SS Letitia in this company or in fact in any other of the Forwood family's Liverpool shipping enterprises. The ship features on an 1896 oil painting which is inscribed on the back ' SS Letitia, Atlas Line, leaving Cartagena'. She is grey hulled with black-topped yellow funnel on which there is an indistinct house/company logo in red.

Don't want to overdo it today as a 'first-timer' and would be grateful for any help.

Thanks

Marti

K urgess
14th October 2008, 10:58
Welcome aboard, Marti.
I'm sure one of our knowledgeable crewmembers will be able to help in some way.
Meanwhile find your way around the ship and have a good voyage.

billyboy
14th October 2008, 11:02
Welcome aboard from the Philippines. Enjoy all this great site has to offer.
Someone will bbe along soon to tell you where to look.

gdynia
14th October 2008, 13:07
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage

tridentport
14th October 2008, 13:51
Perhaps the following will be of interest. Its from a Belfast morning newspaper -

Trial Trip of the S.S. Arden.
This steamer, after being remodelled by Messrs. MacIlwaine & MacColl Ltd., went down the lough for trial on Saturday last. The Arden is a twin screw steamer of about 750 tons gross register, belonging to the Atlas Steamship Company, Liverpool, managed by Messrs. Leech, Harrison & Forwood, and plies in their passenger service round the island of Jamaica. She has been entirely rebuilt from the main deck up, and fitted with a large amount of first-class passenger accommodation, including a saloon, fitted in polished hardwoods, and extending across the entire breadth of the ship. Second-class passenger accommodation has been fitted forward, and ample means of ventilation throughout every part of the ship. The machinery has been entirely refitted for a steam pressure of 130lb., and a large steel boiler to work at that pressure supplied, the entire work being done under the supervision of Messrs. Wm. Esplen & Son, the Company’s consulting engineers. The owners were represented on Saturday by Mr. George Forwood, Mr. Fleming (manager), Mr. Wm. Esplen, and Mr. John Esplen, and after a very satisfactory trial, where a speed of 11 knots was attained, with very inferior American coal, the Arden sailed for Newport, en route for Kingston, Jamaica.
Northern Whig, Tuesday 22 September 1891.
Regards, Alan.

bert thompson
14th October 2008, 16:42
Welcome Marti to this wonderful site
Best wishes
Bert.

Gulpers
14th October 2008, 19:39
Marti,

A warm welcome to the site from the Isle of Anglesey!
I hope you thoroughly enjoy the SN experience and get many happy hours entertainment from your membership. (Thumb)

Marti Forwood
14th October 2008, 20:40
Thanks for this Alan. Haven't come across the Arden before - so more work on the horizon ! She was much smaller than the average Atlas ship.

Marti

benjidog
14th October 2008, 22:24
Welcome from Lancashire.
I hope you will enjoy the site.

tridentport
14th October 2008, 22:29
Could only find one other item -

To the Editor of The Times.

Sir, - At a moment when the public mind is so much exercised by the harrowing accounts of the disaster to the Atlantic, credence is too readily given to every rumour or statement that is set afloat. If these point to negligence or carelessness as the cause of the loss, so much more poignant does it make the grief of those who have to lament the loss of relatives or friends.
Impressed with this view, and without attempting in the least degree to pronounce an opinion upon the causes which led to the vessel’s destruction, and which can only be arrived at after the official investigation, I yet think there are points in the accounts that have been sent home which are not rightly interpreted. In saying this I venture to speak as one who has had the practical charge of a large line of ocean mail steamers for upwards of ten years. I have also recently arrived from New York as a passenger in the Republic, a sister ship to the Atlantic, and can therefore form some opinion of the management and discipline exercised on board the vessels of the White Star Line.
The main point in regard to which the owners of the Atlantic have been mostly censured has been the alleged short supply of coal she received on sailing. It is a great fallacy to assume, as such critics do, that a steamer consumes the same quantity of coal daily, irrespective of distance run, speed of ship, or state of weather. As a matter of fact, the main considerations as to the quantity of coal required are the number of miles to be traversed and the average consumption of the vessel over a given distance. If the Atlantic consumed, as is stated, 60 tons per day at full speed, which would represent 750 tons from Liverpool to New York, she would not consume 60 tons per day if her voyage was prolonged to 15 or 16 days It is stated the Atlantic was 460 miles from New York, and had 127 tons of coal on hoard when the Master bore up Halifax, and he did so because he was only making 7 knots. At such speed the ship could not burn 35 tons per day, and unquestionably there was more than enough on board to carry the vessel to her destination. To bring the test nearer home, the steamers from Folkestone to Boulogne used to occupy two hours and a quarter on the passage, and they consumed 7 tons on the trip; when it was desired to perform the same voyage in two hours, the consumption was 12 tons.
The owners of steamers properly allow a margin over probable requirements, but during my sojourn in New York this winter I noticed no less than six steamers, belonging to three different Liverpool companies other than the White Star, trading between Liverpool and New York, put into Halifax and Boston for coal.
The telegrams from New York state that the emigrants complain of short allowance of provisions. I expect that this has reference only to fresh previsions; these are luxuries not required by our emigration laws, but, nevertheless, are put on board by all the companies. Of course they would not keep beyond a limited time, but it is impossible the supplies of other provisions could have fallen short, as the Government officers personally inspect the regulation provisions before clearing as to weight, and see that a quantity equal to 32 days’ requirements is on board.
On the Republic every Sunday the crew were exercised at boat stations, every member of the crew taking his place at a specified boat; in addition, I noticed the fittings were examined and the lowering apparatus looked to; in fact, I am perfectly convinced that the discipline and arrangements of the White Star steamers are everything that the most timid passenger could desire.
I am, Sir, your obedient servant, Arthur R. Forwood. Liverpool, April 8.

The Times, Wednesday 9 April 1873.

R58484956
15th October 2008, 09:45
Greetings Marti and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

Marti Forwood
16th October 2008, 10:41
Thanks, really useful stuff for my research.
Marti

Damani
23rd March 2014, 19:41
Morning all and hello from another new member ! Am researching the steamship companies - particulalrly the Atlas Steamship Company - run by my great grandfather Sir William Forwood. Have tracked down most of the ships of the Atlas but cannot place the SS Letitia in this company or in fact in any other of the Forwood family's Liverpool shipping enterprises. The ship features on an 1896 oil painting which is inscribed on the back ' SS Letitia, Atlas Line, leaving Cartagena'. She is grey hulled with black-topped yellow funnel on which there is an indistinct house/company logo in red.

Don't want to overdo it today as a 'first-timer' and would be grateful for any help.

Thanks

Marti

Marti,

I somehow MISSED YOUR POST!!!

I began another thread on the Alvo of the Atlas Steamship Line
https://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=58417&highlight=alvo

Have you come across any information on it?

Like you, I would be HIGHLY appreciative of any information or suggestions!!

Damani