lmica empire

empiremica
3rd August 2009, 21:44
hello every one i'm here looking for info on two people my uncle frederick ronald hayward who served on empire mica and my father in law michael joseph goessons who served on san ernesto and deseado i have very little info on both men so any snippet would be great ....many thanks

benjidog
3rd August 2009, 22:00
Welcome from Lancashire - I hope you will enjoy the site.

non descript
3rd August 2009, 22:00
empiremica, a warm welcome to you. Thank you for joining the community and thank you for your first posting on the Empire Mica - let's see what we can do for you. Do enjoy the site and all it has to offer, and we very much look forward to your postings. Bon Voyage. (Thumb)

K urgess
3rd August 2009, 22:01
Welcome aboard from East Yorkshire.
There's bound to be someone in the crew that can help.
Find your way around the ship and have a good voyage.

non descript
3rd August 2009, 22:05
hello every one i'm here looking for info on two people my uncle frederick ronald hayward who served on empire mica and my father in law michael joseph goessons who served on san ernesto and deseado i have very little info on both men so any snippet would be great ....many thanks

I wonder if you visited this site - http://homepage.eircom.net/~gordonsteele/

billyboy
4th August 2009, 00:26
Welcome aboard from the Philippines. Enjoy all this great site has to offer

R58484956
4th August 2009, 09:11
Greetings Empiremica and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

Hugh MacLean
4th August 2009, 17:23
Hello and welcome,
Was FR Hayward born in Bristol 29 Sept 1923?
Regards

Billy1963
7th August 2009, 10:53
Frederick Hayward was one of the 33 men lost from the Empire Mica. He is commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial. Panel 44.

HAYWARD, Cabin Boy, FREDERICK RONALD, S.S. Empire Mica (Middlesbrough). Merchant Navy. 29th June 1942. Age 18. Son of John W. and Kathleen Nellie Hayward, of Shirehampton, Bristol.

From my book "They Shall Grow Not Old...."

Tanker Empire Mica, 8,032grt, (MOWT, Anglo-American Oil Co. Ltd) loaded with a cargo of vaporising oil at Houston, Texas and New Orleans for the UK via Key West. The ship had been sailing independently when on the 29th June 1942 in the Gulf of Mexico in position 29' 25N 85' 17W a torpedo from U-67 tore into the ships hull igniting the oil resulting in violent explosions, which could be heard along the coast, some 29 miles away. This explosion knocked out the communication system so that no general alarm could be sounded. Suddenly bursting into flames the whole of the aft section of the ship was soon ablaze and the fire began to race towards the port side of the midship housing. The men trapped here were faced with an enormous wall of fire, cutting them off from everything aft. The port lifeboat turned turtle in its davit, no doubt due to the force of the explosion, and the aft falls of the starboard lifeboat were surrounded by flames. Orders were given to release the raft situated on the well deck forward, but after hitting the water it floated away, as the ship was still steaming ahead under her own power. When the engine was finally stopped the remaining lifeboat was released and rowed towards the stern of the ship, but although men could see their shipmates struggling, the fire was so intense that they were unable to rescue them. One man climbed to the highest point on the stern and from there dived over the flames and was hauled aboard the boat. Several of the survivors recount horror stories of seeing crew mates on fire on deck before they plunged into the sea. Some remembered one crew member who became stuck in a porthole. He had wedged his head and shoulders through the opening trying to escape, then became stuck fast. He begged his fellow seamen to shoot him before he burned in the fire. His cries went unanswered and he was one of the 33-crew who perished. The 14 survivors in their lifeboat were taken in tow by a pleasure cruiser, which happened to be in the vicinity and transferred them over to the US coastguard cutter Seadream and landed them at Panama City, Florida. The tanker continued to burn and drift for 24 hours before finally sinking in position 29' 18N 85' 21W.

Hugh MacLean
7th August 2009, 16:29
Looks like the same seaman.
F.R. Hayward has a seaman's pouch held in piece BT 372/456/139 (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/catalogue/displaycataloguedetails.asp?CATID=-3334100&CATLN=7&Highlight=%2CHAYWARD%2CF%2CR&accessmethod=0)
Let us know if you need advice on this file and how to obtain it.
Regards