Hmml 904

dick baker
17th August 2009, 12:29
I wonder if someone can help identify a ships bell that belonged to my late Father.
The bell is marked HMML 904 and came into his hands some 35 years or so ago.
Since his death it now resides with me.
Can anyone tell me the type of craft it came from and any history therein?
Thanks. Dick Baker.

Ted Else
17th August 2009, 12:52
A Fairmile "B" built by Jas Miller St Monance. Completed 26th April 1944. Burma RNVR. For Disposal - January 1946.
source: Allied Coastal Forces of WW2 Volume 1 - John Lambert Al Ross

R58484956
17th August 2009, 13:05
Greetings dick and welcome to SN. Ask a question and up pops the answer. Bon voyage.

K urgess
17th August 2009, 13:49
Welcome aboard from East Yorkshire, Dick.
Ever helpful crew have given you an answer already.
Find your way around and have a good trip.

trotterdotpom
17th August 2009, 14:31
HMML - His Majesty's Motor Launch?

If you Google Hmml 904 you can find reference to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission death of William McMenemy RN Able Seaman, died 16th May 1945 on HMML 904. No indication of what happened though.

John T.

eriskay
17th August 2009, 14:32
For Dick Baker :

The Fairmile Class 'B' MLs (Motor Launches) were of copper-fastened double-diagonal wooden hull construction, about 112 feet in length and with a beam of around 18 feet. They were fast little ships that were used for harbour defence, coatal defence, anti-submarine duties, general patrol and air-sea resuce. As Ted has identified, the one you seek information on, HMML 904, was a product of that excellent little boatyard in the East Neuk of Fife, Miller of St Monans, whose fame is more associated with the high-quality fishing vessels they built over the years.

The Fairmile 'B's were powered by two 12-cylinder petrol engines developing 650 HP and whilst a typical cruising speed of 17-18 knots was the norm, they could push along at 20 knots if required.

Good luck with your search for information on HMML 904 !

Ted Else
17th August 2009, 19:28
HMML - His Majesty's Motor Launch?

If you Google Hmml 904 you can find reference to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission death of William McMenemy RN Able Seaman, died 16th May 1945 on HMML 904. No indication of what happened though.

John T.

From Naval-History.net

ML.904, surface gunfire

MCMENEMY, William, Able Seaman, P/JX 521677, MPK (Missing Presumed Killed)

billyboy
17th August 2009, 21:16
Welcome aboard from the Philippines. Enjoy All this great site gas to offer

benjidog
17th August 2009, 22:50
Welcome from Lancashire - I hope you will enjoy the site.

trotterdotpom
18th August 2009, 00:14
From Naval-History.net

ML.904, surface gunfire

MCMENEMY, William, Able Seaman, P/JX 521677, MPK (Missing Presumed Killed)

Thanks Ted. A clinical description of what was no doubt a tragedy for his family.

John T.

Ted Else
18th August 2009, 08:18
Thanks Ted. A clinical description of what was no doubt a tragedy for his family.

John T.

Hello John
Yes - those dreaded words were on many of the equally dreaded telegram's.
I know of an instance where a young bride held onto the 'Missing' part until well after the War had ended, never having had further news from the authorities.
The tragedy was to return, very painfully -to her and her family- as she struggled with an illness late in her life.
Very sad..
Ted

gdynia
19th August 2009, 05:30
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage

spongebob
21st August 2009, 08:15
Dick Baker's thread HM ML 904 relating to WW2 Fairmile B motor launches and HDML launches takes me back to the NZ Dockyard days when the remnants of the NZ fleet were adapted for peace time duty.
In 1941 the British Admiralty authorised the newly formed RNZ Navy to build 12 of the Fairmile design 112 foot craft using NZ Kauri timbers to double diagonally plank the hulls. Pennant Numbers Q400 to Q411 were allotted to the vessels
The craft were originally powered with twin V12 Hall-Scott petrol engines each of 600 Hp which gave the launches top speeds of 20 knots,very fast for the hull form, but with a shocking fuel consumption that limited their range and viability.
All but one of these vessels were sold to private buyers after the war but one, Q411 "Iris Moana" was retained for naval use, mainly as a ferry to the gulf island stores and training establishments.
The Hall-Scotts were extracted and replaced with Hercules or Gray Marine 6 cylinder diesel engines that were equally unsuited as the service speeds were cut in half.

Many a would be mariner bought a Fairmile hull cheap but most of these were left to rot on their moorings as the sheer cost of re-equipping defeated the exercise but at least three or four made it into peace time merchant service.
The Hall-Scotts were gone by the time I worked on the Craft but there was many a legendary tale told about these big brutal beasts that cost a fortune to feed.

Bob

dick baker
3rd August 2014, 13:25
I owe both a debt of gratitude and an apology for waiting this long to say thank you for all the information Gents.
We moved house shortly after my missive was posted and have just recovered the bell from the loft, it resides now polished on the outside wall, where it tolls to visitors, signalling the opening of the bar and the provisions table.
Thanks again for the information, though I don't know how my father acquired it, he did have contacts through the shipyard we all worked in, that of Furness shipbuilders, latterly Swan Hunters and Smiths Dock of Haverton Hill on the river tees.
Prior to his passing he had a splendid red and white knotted rope attached, so it looks the business.

chadburn
3rd August 2014, 18:39
He may have obtained it from the surplus shop at Thornaby, then Stockton (Norton Road) and then on to Blakeston Lane who dealt with redundant/scrap from the RNSD at Eaglescliffe over the years. It was very fortunate the owner had kept some of the steam spares that the depot had classed as redundant otherwise the Hermes would have not made it to the Falklands in 1982.

tim hughes61
7th November 2016, 18:51
Evening chaps.
I have just joined the forum and i notice that its been a long time since anyone posted but here goes anyway! The above named sailor is my father and was part of the crew from picking up the craft in Fife to the day it was handed over to the Burmese RNVR in 1946. He can cast some light too on the death of MCMENEMY, William, Able Seaman, P/JX 521677, MPK who he had just moments before exchanged watch duties with when the poor lad was shot and very sadly killed by a sniper from the banks of the Irrawaddy river in Burma.
My Dad is still with us thankfully and ,at 92 ,whilst a little deaf ,still fires on all cylinders. I would be chuffed to bits to try and obtain any information about the ships company and a picture of the bell as mentioned as long ago as 2009 in this forum. Does anyone know whether there are any other survivors of the crew? Please call me on 07793709131 and pass on any info? Dad would be chuffed to bits to hear any news related to HMML 904.
Thank you very much in advance.
Tim Hughes/