H series Shell tankers

NicoRos
23rd March 2012, 15:14
These rusty old Shell tankers will once more be revived. Very skilled modellers have managed to built scale 1:130 replica's of these well known ships. The Dutch flag Kosicia's drawings have been used.
The work is still in progress and a lot has yet to be done before the exact replica's can be launched. All are fully radio controlled, but will be usually used for display only.
The total number will 15, Dutch and UK customers, who can choose from their favourite names.
E.t.a. will be approx august. They will be marketed marginally.

mikeg
24th March 2012, 15:03
Had a shock when you said Shells 'H Boats' were going to be revived! Okay that said I quite liked my trips aboard the Halia.
Kudos to those skilled modellers, I'm really looking forward to seeing the 1:130 replicas.
(Applause)

barney b
11th April 2012, 16:42
How can one get a chance to buy one?

R58484956
11th April 2012, 16:49
Dry dock job to fit a new propeller. The model looks like a photo of the orginal.

james hansell
11th April 2012, 17:03
sailed on the Hemiplecta in 1964,last voyage before it was transfered to Australia Shell,paid off in Yokahama Japan, be pleased to hear from any old shipmates. jim

NicoRos
11th April 2012, 22:08
How can one get a chance to buy one?

The time that the models will go on transport will be announced on the picasa album.

https://picasaweb.google.com/103692380584041990607?feat=email&gsessionid=a0Tn7HbqkxfjnY3B0M0B_w

Frank Lawlor
18th July 2012, 12:53
I did my first 2 trips on the Hastula. Sailed from Rotterdam up the coast of Norway around April 66. It paid off in Hull, but I stayed on for the next trip to Venezuela, and went up the East coast of the USA, and then down the St Lawrence to Montreal. Ended up paying off in Cardiff I think.

Tom Priestnall
6th February 2013, 22:11
Hyala and Hinea for me!.

tom roberts
7th February 2013, 09:30
Sailed on the Hyria mid 50s as s.o.s 7 months trips up and down the east coast Americas B.A. to Perth Amboy other ports Corpus Christi, Curacoa, ,Bush Terminal Brooklin among other.Had a good time. Not a bad feeder as I recall.Love the model would like one maybe I could point out my cabin port side nearest the stern, single berth first ship I was ever on that I had one.

calvin
10th February 2013, 15:42
mine halia lightening ops round uk waters and continent

Dave Hone
1st May 2013, 10:39
Was in the Helcion, Helisoma, Haminea, Hyria & Hadra in the '60's. Average trip was about 7 - 9 months. Good days, we saw a lot of the world and it always seemed safe to go ashore anywhere (apart from Viet Nam but that's another story!)

jonjo777
1st May 2013, 14:39
hi i sailed on the hindsia from singapore in the sixties

Jim Glover
11th May 2013, 23:19
Sailed on the Hemiplecta as 4/E 1973ish Field Days every day The water book was the most important piece of documented information .2/E used to go bananas if you used too much water .Now all they are concerned about is accident reports,permit to work and every piece of paper document going .Still believe the old days were the best coming off watch and having a few ice cool beers with your mates .

oldman 80
12th May 2013, 01:37
These rusty old Shell tankers will once more be revived. Very skilled modellers have managed to built scale 1:130 replica's of these well known ships. The Dutch flag Kosicia's drawings have been used.
The work is still in progress and a lot has yet to be done before the exact replica's can be launched. All are fully radio controlled, but will be usually used for display only.
The total number will 15, Dutch and UK customers, who can choose from their favourite names.
E.t.a. will be approx august. They will be marketed marginally.


I never worked for Shell other than periodically ending up on Charter to them.
The model however I believe I recognise clearly. I sailed on an ex- Shell H class (I believe) back in the mid 1970's as Chief Officer. She was called the ss. Siam and was at that time, one of two, (ss Bangkok being the other), owned by Thai Ocean Transport Co., (TOTCO). She was a Thai Tanker Training ship, (purchased from Shell and Chartered back to them) managed and operated by Denholm Ship Management (U.K.). She was a Jumbo-ised version of the original Shell "H Class", having been cut in half and a new additional section inserted abaft the midship castle, increasing her deadweight to somewhere in the region of 70,000 tonnes, if my memory serves me correctly. A "free flow" tanker she was, which had both its upsides and downsides.
As for the "Rusty" description, well yes she certainly was that, except for the new section inserted during the jumbo-isation process.
As C/O I vividly recall the incredibly rusted and seemingly paper thin bulkhead between the pump room and cargo spaces forward of it. ( the pump room was immediately forward of the aft accommodation block and E.R.) The corrosion in that vicinity was "alarming", and I recall the Master of the vessel giving me clear instructions that at twilight each morning, I was to ensure the E.R. and aft accommodation was still where it should be, and that it had not "dropped off" during the hours of darkness.
He further added, I was to call him immediately, - if it had.
Despite that factor, she was an incredibly happy ship, manned to the hilt, as each DSM deck and engineer officer, had a Thai Military (Navy) counterpart/understudy who was there being trained in Tanker Operations. They were a great bunch of guys. For my part, it was both a privilege and a pleasure, to have been involved in that particular training project.

BlythSpirit
12th May 2013, 05:25
I would think it nigh on impossible to jumboize a 19,000 DWT vessel to 70,000DWT. Shell did it with Z class ships from 38,000DWT

oldman 80
12th May 2013, 08:42
I would think it nigh on impossible to jumboize a 19,000 DWT vessel to 70,000DWT. Shell did it with Z class ships from 38,000DWT

Well as I said I was never a shell guy. You may well be right and it could have been a Z class vessel - I'm not sure - it was a long time ago now. However the looks are very similar, as depicted by the model shown in posting No.1.
Irrespective though, for some reason the "H" class sticks in my mind - so clearly one of us has got the "Z" and the "H" classes mixed up.
Quite apart from that, one thing is obviously common to both the Z and the H class of Shell tanker, (and probably a few more besides) namely, significant Corrosion and Wastage, on a fairly extensive scale.
Additionally, in those days Shell were considered little more than being amongst the worlds most major environmental vandals. They were also most probably the first to latch on to the concept of selling off their old junk tonnage to third world, would be operators, complete with a guaranteed "charter back" contract. That way they could continue to operate (by then) inferior, sub standard, past their use by date tankers, under the "umbrella" of foreign operators.
When incidents occurred, such as major oil spills, groundings etc., etc., then the arrangements outlined, concealed who was really behind it all, - but not for long though !!!
The practice was soon exposed for what it really was, and then, and only then, did Shell set about cleaning up it's act - quite dramatically so, if my memory serves me correctly. It was a fairly lengthy and protracted process still not completed by the end of the 1980's, and perhaps not entirely - even today.
Were the Shell "Z" class vessels "free flow" ships ?
If so, then you are probably right, although "Z" does not stick in my mind - whilst "H" does - for some obscure reason.
(I'm sure the ss.Siam's original plans had an "H" as the first letter of the original vessels name - but I could be wrong though).

Edit:- Your "From 38000 Dwt" certainly sounds right - or thereabouts.

Manchester
12th May 2013, 18:28
Well as I said I was never a shell guy. You may well be right and it could have been a Z class vessel - I'm not sure - it was a long time ago now. However the looks are very similar, as depicted by the model shown in posting No.1.
Irrespective though, for some reason the "H" class sticks in my mind - so clearly one of us has got the "Z" and the "H" classes mixed up.
Quite apart from that, one thing is obviously common to both the Z and the H class of Shell tanker, (and probably a few more besides) namely, significant Corrosion and Wastage, on a fairly extensive scale.
Additionally, in those days Shell were considered little more than being amongst the worlds most major environmental vandals. They were also most probably the first to latch on to the concept of selling off their old junk tonnage to third world, would be operators, complete with a guaranteed "charter back" contract. That way they could continue to operate (by then) inferior, sub standard, past their use by date tankers, under the "umbrella" of foreign operators.
When incidents occurred, such as major oil spills, groundings etc., etc., then the arrangements outlined, concealed who was really behind it all, - but not for long though !!!
The practice was soon exposed for what it really was, and then, and only then, did Shell set about cleaning up it's act - quite dramatically so, if my memory serves me correctly. It was a fairly lengthy and protracted process still not completed by the end of the 1980's, and perhaps not entirely - even today.
Were the Shell "Z" class vessels "free flow" ships ?
If so, then you are probably right, although "Z" does not stick in my mind - whilst "H" does - for some obscure reason.
(I'm sure the ss.Siam's original plans had an "H" as the first letter of the original vessels name - but I could be wrong though).

Edit:- Your "From 38000 Dwt" certainly sounds right - or thereabouts.

Oldman 80 you certainly seem to live in a dream world. I sailed on "Siam" in 1982 and it was originally Shell tanker "Dorcasia" an all aft tanker which has never been jumboised!
Her sister ship was called "Mena" another Shell "D" class ship. They were both managed by Shell and crewed by Shell personnel. Nothing at all to do with Denholms (thank God).
Suggest you go back to sleep.

oldman 80
13th May 2013, 00:17
Oldman 80 you certainly seem to live in a dream world. I sailed on "Siam" in 1982 and it was originally Shell tanker "Dorcasia" an all aft tanker which has never been jumboised!
Her sister ship was called "Mena" another Shell "D" class ship. They were both managed by Shell and crewed by Shell personnel. Nothing at all to do with Denholms (thank God).
Suggest you go back to sleep.

NO, YOU ARE WRONG !!!!! VERY WRONG.
You may have sailed on a "Siam" in 1982, but it was not the "Siam" I refer to - it was probably her replacement. The one I refer to was scrapped before 1980.
The one you sailed on may have been, indeed probably was, Shell Managed - Denholm's management / training agreement having been completed long before the era you are shouting your mouth off about, so rudely, so arrogantly, and with such obvious ignorance.

The s.s. Siam you are talking about is an entirely different vessel.
The Siam I am referring to did not survive until 1982 - she was scrapped in the latter part of the 1970's, and probably in mid-late 1977 or thereabouts. ( I believe, in fact am almost certain, TOTCO replaced her with another vessel and named her "Siam" also.
The Siam I refer to was as follows :-
Registered in Bangkok.
Official Number:-164987 or 169987 (the stamp is smudged)
GRT 33635
NRT 21374
SHP 14790
The ss Siam I refer to was very much a Denholm Managed Ship, (Group 3 - I think, - Superintendent David Livingstone. )
I signed on her on 26th July 1975 in Whangerei N.Z. ( D. Naismith was Master) Articles closed/reopened Dubai 1st Sept 1975 and change of Master to Malcolm Cameron. I signed off her in Teesport on 21st January 1976.
Go on - now tell me I was not employed by DSM.
I agree, thank god you were not engaged by Denholm - You wouldn't have lasted long if you had been.
You clearly have some problems !!

Hugh Wilson
13th May 2013, 00:32
Oldman80,

Off topic I know, but I see you sailed with a good friend of mine, Malcolm Cameron. Unfortunately Malcolm died 3 years back after struggling with prostate cancer for some time. Sadly, his eldest son died of the same illness only one year later. As far as I know, Joan, his wife is still living in Buckie.

Hugh

oldman 80
13th May 2013, 00:58
Oldman80,

Off topic I know, but I see you sailed with a good friend of mine, Malcolm Cameron. Unfortunately Malcolm died 3 years back after struggling with prostate cancer for some time. Sadly, his eldest son died of the same illness only one year later. As far as I know, Joan, his wife is still living in Buckie.

Hugh

Oh - that is sad news indeed.
I last had some contact with Malcolm (in Buckie) around 2001, but it was only quite briefly - some email exchanges.
His wife joined the Siam along with two of his children, when I was signing off in Teesport. We met quite briefly. I think she and the children remained on board until he completed his tour of duty - in Fos I think.
That bloody cancer - it got me too - but I have survived mine - thanks to some excellent surgeons etc., - here in Australia. Had I not migrated here, I am certain I would not be around today. In that respect, Australia has been amazingly good to me, indeed, unbelievably so.

Kindest Regards,
and I hope this finds you in good health.

Ian Brown
13th May 2013, 05:06
I was 2nd mate on the 'Bangkok' and we took her over from French Shell in Singapore and she had been the 'Isocardia'
She was jumbo-ized with a terrible change in beam just ford of E/R.

The auto-pilot and original rudder just couldn't keep her on a straight course and if you had a ship on a course that would pass close you had to put a man on the wheel to steady her up.
The cargo system was free-flow.

oldman 80
13th May 2013, 05:58
I was 2nd mate on the 'Bangkok' and we took her over from French Shell in Singapore and she had been the 'Isocardia'
She was jumbo-ized with a terrible change in beam just ford of E/R.

The auto-pilot and original rudder just couldn't keep her on a straight course and if you had a ship on a course that would pass close you had to put a man on the wheel to steady her up.
The cargo system was free-flow.

That sounds pretty much to me like the identical sister of the DSM managed ss. Siam - of the mid 1970's era.
Those Thai trainees certainly benefited from the total DSM experience, as indeed did TOTCO itself.
Not only did they learn and experience practical on board tanker practice, but they also learned a serious lesson about Shell and their second hand junk tonnage marketing policies.
They learned that if subjected to those policies again at any time in the future, then they should not decline the offer, but they should be absolutely certain that Shell be contracted to manage their own crap tonnage (past it's use by date) for themselves.
By the time Siam and Bangkok were scrapped DSM had trained those guys very well - the whole "complete tanker package" - in fact. Those guys had experienced it first hand for themselves, and they could therefore, by then, I suspect, stand very much on their own two feet and keep their heads above water - so to speak.
That was Denholm Training at its best - total and complete, in every sense of the word. How to do it and how not to do it. It's what they set out to do, and that's what they did by the end.
To keep crap tonnage running takes the very best the industry has to offer - make no mistake about that.
The names of most of those Thai guys have escaped my memory - as they were rather strange and complicated names. Not so however, the most infamous of them all, I reckon. Extra 2/0, and I have reason to believe, subsequently C/O Chitporn Tanti - something or other.
My god was he a character and a half - the type most would welcome on any kind of vessel, I suspect. Oh boy could he relate a good story - from the days he flew migs for the Thai Fleet Air Arm equivalent (I suppose). That of course was prior to being disciplined for his "in flight" escapades, and being sent to sea to learn tanker ops with DSM, - allegedly as part of his "punishment".
Good old Chitporn - people like him really do "brighten the horizons" sometimes.
(Thumb)

oldman 80
13th May 2013, 06:57
Just had another memory recall as a result of #21 above.
Yes Siam had been French at some time in the past.
She still had on board in the Bosuns store the mandatory (under French legislation) lead lined coffin - just in case.
The chinese crew did not like that at all - it was a bad omen in their book.
By comparison, under Red Ensign legislation - well just a piece of old canvas sufficed.

davidrwarwick
13th May 2013, 09:04
Could it have been Isomeria, sister ship of Isocardia (Bangkok), also jumboised, built 1956 scrapped 1975.

More details :-

http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/339/isomeria+(1)/

Dave

Manchester
13th May 2013, 19:57
Ok, grovel time again! Sincere apologies to Oldman 80. I now realise the "Siam" I sailed on was a replacement for the "Siam" you sailed on. The one I was on appears to have been bought by TOTCO in 1977 - so a slight confusion when you said you were on it in the mid 70's.

oldman 80
13th May 2013, 22:25
Could it have been Isomeria, sister ship of Isocardia (Bangkok), also jumboised, built 1956 scrapped 1975.

More details :-

http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/339/isomeria+(1)/

Dave

It could very well have been. Built 1956 - yes that would be about right. Sister to Bangkok - almost certainly, although I personally did not sail on the Bangkok. Scrapped 1975 - well the Bangkok may have been scrapped in 75 but not the Siam. She departed Teesport in late January 1976 - for FOS I believe.
She was at that time destined for scrapping, but just how soon after her departure from Teesport that occurred I am not sure - but it certainly wasn't a long time after.
Captain Malcolm Cameron was in command when she left Teesport and from what I remember he told me in emails in 2001, he was relieved in Fos.
From that info, if my memory is correct, a new master must have joined her in February 1976. From that point in time she could have been scrapped at any time - I have a feeling (but only a feeling) it was maybe as much as 12 - 18 months later.
If she was indeed the Isomeria originally, then it seems Shell had an "I" class as well. However my memory still says her (Siam's)original name started with an "H". I wouldn't guarantee that memory is correct, but I am fairly sure that it is.
The black and white photo on the website you have given looks very much like her (the DSM " Siam") for sure.

Malky Glaister
14th May 2013, 00:41
If my memory serves me correctly, both Siam and Bangkok were French in a previous existance. Their names I do not know however I seem to recall that they were both equipped with wine tanks when handed over to DSM promoting much amusement elsewhere in the fleet at the time and wonderment as to how long this would last.
They were steamers, I don't suppose there are too many engineers still with us who sailed on them.

Glad to see you back Oldman 80!!

regards

Malky (Pint)

Malky Glaister
14th May 2013, 00:50
Anyone interested in ISOMERIA etc can visit HELDERLINE website were they will find a couple of pics.
Hope this helps, there is a brief history but no mention of Siam or Bangkok but jumbisation (what a word) is mentioned.

regards
Malky (Pint)

oldman 80
14th May 2013, 05:18
If my memory serves me correctly, both Siam and Bangkok were French in a previous existance. Their names I do not know however I seem to recall that they were both equipped with wine tanks when handed over to DSM promoting much amusement elsewhere in the fleet at the time and wonderment as to how long this would last.
They were steamers, I don't suppose there are too many engineers still with us who sailed on them.

Glad to see you back Oldman 80!!

regards

Malky (Pint)

Oh yes - you are quite right there Malky.
Steam indeed they were. I can't remember the names of many of the engineers, apart from Andy Milne who was third - and a real good hard working bloke. The chief was ex R.N. and not very interested in commercial commitments/obligations etc.,
I believe Andy ended up in the North Sea as an OIM on some rigs or platforms - or so Malcolm Cameron advised me by email in 2001.
When I paid off in Teesport, Derek Conway was joining as 2nd Engineer. He sailed with me later as Chief on one of the large H.K. Ore/Oilers.
After Malcolm Cameron joined I went day work (we had plenty of guys on board) - and spent most of my days in the pumproom which was something of disaster area. God those pumps were a problem, as indeed was the pipework, the cargo hydraulics, and pretty much everything else.
However she was the only ship I ever sailed in with a high expansion foam generator serving the pumproom. It was really impressive. I tested it one day (the intention was to be a very brief test) but after starting the water flow (Fire & GS p/p) I cracked open the foam valve to verify flow from the tank, and the wheel came off in my hand. (The spindle broke off in the gland)
I reckon it took about two minutes and no more to fill the pumproom
from bottom to top and out through the doors and the vents, and then it continued along the deck. By the time I got to an operational telephone, and someone down below answered it - it was too late - the foam tank was empty. The pumproom remained full for several days, before the foam finally subsided. It was true what they said about the stuff, you could walk into it, stay there and survive. In fact it was almost a pleasant experience - quite soothing I remember, - breathing in it was no problem at all, and it didn't even feel wet. Truly Amazing stuff.
The alleged wine tanks - yes that rings a bell also - they were in the stores below the midship's castle/accommodation block. I think they were used for Kerosene, or something along those lines, under DSM.
We did one voyage from the Gulf to Australia - Geelong and Sydney and another to the U.K.
Both the Livingstone brothers attended in Geelong - the boiler refractories had collapsed and the water tubes were in a really bad way.
Repairs took several days, (about 10, I think) during which I took off up the road to Melbourne in a borrowed car to stock up with some 4 litre casks of the best of Dan Murphies wines and port.
It was pretty cheap in those days, and tasted as good as any French stuff - probably better, in fact.
In 2001, (25/26 years later) when corresponding with Malcolm Cameron by email he was still ranting on about it, and as far as I could gather, had tracked down a supplier in the U.K. (He was retired by then, and seemingly still in good health, kicking up hell because the council wouldn't cut the grass near his house).
It was a good drop of stuff for sure (Dan Murphies) - especially the Port which we consumed with our coffee at nights, whilst engaged in Malcolm's nightly Scrabble session which invariably lasted to midnight. He seldom lost a game. (There was a coffee percolator in his day room)
Vic (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah) Green was Chief Steward, most of the time I was on board, - I expect you came across him in the past.
She certainly wasn't the best Denholm feeder, but not bad, I suppose.
Although a bit of a wreck, I quite enjoyed my time on her, - it was certainly interesting, that's for sure, and there was always plenty to do.

BlythSpirit
14th May 2013, 05:19
but jumbisation (what a word) is mentioned.

The word is jumboisation ( still quite a word!!)

Malky Glaister
14th May 2013, 05:54
Oh I missed out an O !!

Cheers Blythspirit

regards

Malky

Duncan112
14th May 2013, 13:31
Miramar would suggest ISANDA, built 1955 Atlantique 31997 DWT 201.2 m LOA 25.6m beam, enlarged 1966 62206 DWT 239.8m LOA 31m beam Broken up 1976 Kaoshung.

Increasing the length is not unusual but the beam - now that must have been interesting - I think this is mentioned elsewhere on this site.

oldman 80
14th May 2013, 23:34
Miramar would suggest ISANDA, built 1955 Atlantique 31997 DWT 201.2 m LOA 25.6m beam, enlarged 1966 62206 DWT 239.8m LOA 31m beam Broken up 1976 Kaoshung.

Increasing the length is not unusual but the beam - now that must have been interesting - I think this is mentioned elsewhere on this site.

"Interesting" - sure is the word.
A prominent "Notch" at a particularly badly corroded area.
Always a bit of a worry particularly during adverse weather.
Most noticeable standing on centreline abaft wheelhouse looking aft, as I remember it.

Edit: The Jumboised dwt you indicate may be correct - but I have a feeling it was nearer the 70000 though (68206 ? maybe)
or possibly even, the 70000 was "displacement" although I am inclined to think not - Dwt was always the figure most likely to stick in my mind except for vessels where draft surveys were the order of the day.

oldman 80
15th May 2013, 02:05
Oh I missed out an O !!

Cheers Blythspirit

regards

Malky

Best just ignore him Malky - I think we all know his game.
The type Commissioner Borthwick A.O./ P.S.M. of the Montara Enquiry became particularly switched on to.
Perhaps even "the dots" are beginning to join up, - the trail is a long one, - believe me.
(*))

Malky Glaister
15th May 2013, 05:01
When I was a phase 3 engineering apprentice at Springburn Tech Glasgow in 1967 there were a good number of Shell apprentices who had been to sea for a year. us J&J lads had not yet set sail.
We were regaled with stories of "H" boats and "V" boats etc. Ships that are recalled are Haustellum and Hygromia and Volsella.

Tales of Aruba, Curacao and the Happy Valley. ( Campo Alegre??) enthralled us!

I wonder what hapened to those chaps. We all had a fine time at Springburn!

regards

Malky (Pint)

oldman 80
15th May 2013, 08:11
When I was a phase 3 engineering apprentice at Springburn Tech Glasgow in 1967 there were a good number of Shell apprentices who had been to sea for a year. us J&J lads had not yet set sail.
We were regaled with stories of "H" boats and "V" boats etc. Ships that are recalled are Haustellum and Hygromia and Volsella.

Tales of Aruba, Curacao and the Happy Valley. ( Campo Alegre??) enthralled us!

I wonder what hapened to those chaps. We all had a fine time at Springburn!

regards

Malky (Pint)

Hmm - I see.
Something "strange" going on / went on here, - me thinks.

davidrwarwick
15th May 2013, 08:45
Helderline sites state Isanda was discarded by Shell France in 1973 and renamed Siam and scrapped in Kaosiung in 1976 :-

http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/342/isanda/

Thats got to be it Oldman!

Dave

oldman 80
15th May 2013, 10:31
Helderline sites state Isanda was discarded by Shell France in 1973 and renamed Siam and scrapped in Kaosiung in 1976 :-

http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/342/isanda/

Thats got to be it Oldman!

Dave

I reckon it is.
When she was sold / discarded to TOTCO and renamed Siam that is when DSM would have taken on the vessels management and Training of the Thai's.
I seem to recall it was the Thais first venture into commercial tanker Ops, and maybe even, commercial deep sea shipping of any kind.
The wording "discarded" is interesting in itself.
Rather unusual - don't you think ?
Anyhow the rear end didn't "drop off" in the night ( as we feared,) before she reached the breakers yard. Engineers, crew and cooks all lived down aft.
Something similar happened to the Kirki - early 1990's, but in that case it was the bow that dropped off, but at least no one was living up there.
Bad days - so they were. Some Classification Societies just were not doing their jobs.

Edit: I note that helderline nl website gives her an IMO Number. That too is strange considering IMO Nos. did not exist in those days.

Duncan112
15th May 2013, 11:40
Something similar happened to the Kirki - early 1990's, but in that case it was the bow that dropped off, but at least no one was living up there.
Bad days - so they were. Some Classification Societies just were not doing their jobs.

Which reminds me - been on here a few times before but always raises a giggle for me http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcU4t6zRAKg

oldman 80
15th May 2013, 12:20
Sorry guys #29 (Spelling)
For Dan Murphies read Dan Murphy.

Was the Kirki a Shell "Discard" - I wonder.

oldman 80
15th May 2013, 13:52
Which reminds me - been on here a few times before but always raises a giggle for me http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcU4t6zRAKg

Not for me though - just too many losses from that era.
Dark, Dark, Days - so they were.

Duncan112
15th May 2013, 14:04
Not so much the accident to the ship for one cannot make light of an incident that either causes death injury or damages the environment OM but the way the politician dodges the question - I hear it every morning on Radio 4 and usually end up bellowing at the radio

oldman 80
16th May 2013, 23:29
Not so much the accident to the ship for one cannot make light of an incident that either causes death injury or damages the environment OM but the way the politician dodges the question - I hear it every morning on Radio 4 and usually end up bellowing at the radio

O.K. Duncan - thank you for that clear clarification of your meaning.
I'm with you on that - absolutely 100%

(Thumb)

LucyKnight
12th June 2013, 17:18
Sailed on Hemitrochus as radio officer on her last voyage ending up in Taiwan end of 1977 after a final lube oil charter in far East. One skin of her hull had apparently rusted thru, no air conditioning working so radio room became very hot. There had been a fire in her main engine when we had left Black sea and over 100 tubes burnted out,which the engineers had to fix at sea. We limped thru the Gib straits at a few knots and when she blew here tubes it just about blacked the strait out. It was an interesting trip though.

Bobmac
19th June 2013, 05:59
I would think it nigh on impossible to jumboize a 19,000 DWT vessel to 70,000DWT. Shell did it with Z class ships from 38,000DWT

3/O in the Zaphon 1959 she was 39,??? dot and later jumboised. Part of her was later used as a barge in the attachment of clip ons to the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Always thought Shell were pretty good with pollution control, they were the initiators of the 'Load on top' practice, maybe a stopgap but in the right direction.

oldman 80
19th June 2013, 06:58
3/O in the Zaphon 1959 she was 39,??? dot and later jumboised. Part of her was later used as a barge in the attachment of clip ons to the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Always thought Shell were pretty good with pollution control, they were the initiators of the 'Load on top' practice, maybe a stopgap but in the right direction.

Well " load on top " sure was a step in the right direction. I always thought it was Chevron who initiated it - but I could be wrong.
However nothing could beat the introduction of Inert Gas and Crude Oil Washing - those things were enormous steps in the right direction. Indeed, revolutionary I'd suggest.
Shell certainly needed the IG back in the late 60's and early 70's.
Just too many of their VLCC's blowing their tank decks off - just like that. I remember the image of one of them, the tank deck opened up and folded back over the bridge - not unlike a sardine can..
When tank sizes reached the 10,000 cubic metres - things really got nasty when tank cleaning - until IG systems became common place.

michaelF
26th November 2013, 12:09
Nearly missed this thread,
sailed as second mate on the SS Siam(ON 169987) with denholms from Nov 74 at Teesport to Jan 75 Capetown.
We had the ex Thai air force pilots on board , one of them Pratcha (spelling) paid off with me and came for a meal at my cousins house just outside Capetown before flying home next day.

This was a memorable trip for many reasons .

mike

vasco
27th November 2013, 12:06
[ I remember the image of one of them, the tank deck opened up and folded back over the bridge - not unlike a sardine can..
When tank sizes reached the 10,000 cubic metres - things really got nasty when tank cleaning - until IG systems became common place.[/QUOTE]

Mactra and Marpessa

Jon T.
27th November 2013, 12:58
First trip Nav. Cad. on ss Hemimactra, joined 17th December 1969 in Gothenburg, when the Mactra incident happened.
Mother, bless her, was on the phone to Shell Centre when she heard the news to confirm the name of the "boat" which was in trouble as she was a bit concerned.
"Madam," she was told, "we do not have boats, we have ships!"

LucyKnight
30th November 2013, 15:04
[ I remember the image of one of them, the tank deck opened up and folded back over the bridge - not unlike a sardine can..
When tank sizes reached the 10,000 cubic metres - things really got nasty when tank cleaning - until IG systems became common place.

Mactra and Marpessa[/QUOTE]

LucyKnight
30th November 2013, 15:08
[ I remember the image of one of them, the tank deck opened up and folded back over the bridge - not unlike a sardine can..
When tank sizes reached the 10,000 cubic metres - things really got nasty when tank cleaning - until IG systems became common place.

Mactra and Marpessa[/QUOTE]

There are images of both of the ships on the Shell Helderline site. Click on Shell Tankers - then M - and scroll down for their names - after clicking on their names scroll down below the ships's specifications and crew lists and there are several photos on both site.

R396040
30th November 2013, 16:24
HYALINA Shell

Just found this post and it rang a bell in my old head. See from my old dis.bk I sailed on Hyalina from Sept to Dec 1953. She was very new and proper in those days certainly not rusty, We ran from Rotterdam to Curacoa couple of times I recall paid off to get Christmas at home
Stuart

Peke
24th December 2013, 12:08
Hi. I sailed on Hadra as deck apprentice first trip 58-59. Went BA 3 times and up amazon and sucked in fresh water for Curaçao power station. Also to Accra with kerosine in drums as deck cargo and unloaded overboard to canoes. Then to Lagos with av gas. Then back Curaçao through Pamama to NZ 3 ports then to Mena load for Rotterdam. Falmouth for docking then Curaçao for hamburg and albourg and look out for mines in Baltic eventually paid off in Venezuela and came home on the Gas Turbine powered Auris. Only DA on board and scrapped Taff rails and varnished all the way over to Thameshaven. After leave joined Horomya and more interesting places including Fao Balikpapen Borneo Hong Kong, Sydney and one of the first loads out of Port Harcourt what a dump.These H boats were hard work and even in 1958 where out of date compared to the latest Norwegian tankers but they sure went to some interesting places. David Warren

Aberdonian
10th April 2014, 17:28
I sailed with Captain R S Richard as Third Mate in the Helcion in 1959. A small wiry man he was said, at the time, to be the most intellectual master in Shell. He claimed to be fluent in French and Spanish and could “get around” in German, Hindi, Malay, and a form of Chinese.

He may well have viewed me as somewhat untutored, to put it nicely, because during long ocean crossings he would come up onto the bridge at 2100 on my watch each night and hold forth on all manner of subjects until 2300. They say you never forget a good teacher which is possibly why I remember him so well.

The Second Mate in the same ship, G T Prince from the Northeast, was another good man to sail with.

Keith

loylobby
23rd April 2014, 21:10
.

The Second Mate in the same ship, G T Prince from the Northeast, was another good man to sail with.

Keith

Sorry to inform you that Captain Gordon T Prince died recently; it was in the Shell Pensioners Association magazine.

Aberdonian
24th April 2014, 15:02
Sorry to inform you that Captain Gordon T Prince died recently; it was in the Shell Pensioners Association magazine.

Sad to hear of Gordon’s passing. We sailed together in the Helcion on an 11 month voyage. My condolences to Family and Friends.

Keith

oldbosun
27th April 2014, 17:13
HYALINA Shell

Just found this post and it rang a bell in my old head. See from my old dis.bk I sailed on Hyalina from Sept to Dec 1953. She was very new and proper in those days certainly not rusty, We ran from Rotterdam to Curacoa couple of times I recall paid off to get Christmas at home
Stuart

I was in Hyalina in 1949. For some reason she was looked upon as a very fast ship. Very modern and state of the art for a tanker. Captain "Butcher" Shaw. Hyalina net tonnage was 7,300 something. Can't read her other tonnages in my old discharge book. 12,000 Gross?
I remember how astounded we were when Shell brought out the first of their 28,000 tonners! 28,000 WOW!
Yes, it did wow us in those days.

Bobgayton
16th May 2014, 17:50
Hi there
Hemimactra, Hindsia and Humilaria were the 'H' boats I sailed on, they used to say they were 'chatty but happy'. I have some great memories of all three ships but I can't say the same about another tanker.

I flew out with two other blokes to join the Valvata a Shell tanker as a fireman/greaser in Piney Point in August '71, the only bad ship I ever sailed on. I remember getting logged before I'd even signed on. That must be some record!

They said the ship was jinxed and after a few weeks I could understand why. Apparently a crew-member had died just before I joined so I wasn't off to a very good start.
We were out from BA heading for Sweden, I think it was and I was on watch in the engine room when I heard an almighty scream from down below. One of the blokes I joined with was a first tripper from Nottingham, just a young fellow, I think he'd just come out of the army.
Most of the blokes working in the engine room just wore cut-down jeans but this chap was very safety conscious and always wore a boiler suit. He was painting the turbine when his boiler suit got caught on a lug on the rev counter. It whipped the boiler suit from him and tore his arm off mid-way up his forearm. He was more concerned with covering his nakedness than anything else, obviously in shock.
We diverted to San Juan and he was taken off, I'd love to know what happened to him.
Not too long after that a close relative was killed in a plane crash and I paid off.
One ship best forgotten.

nomad21
25th October 2015, 20:37
anybody out there sailed on the "Hanetia" 1958 -59?

David Campbell
26th October 2015, 02:40
anybody out there sailed on the "Hanetia" 1958 -59?


www. helderline.nl This is a great site for Shell. David.

Aberdonian
26th October 2015, 16:09
We had our share of engine stoppages in the turbo electric Helcion one of which occurred in 1960 when bound from Punta Cardon towards Dakar. We had no sooner left the Caribbean, by passing between St Lucia and St Vincent into the Atlantic, when a loud racket of escaping steam came from the engine room. A joint had blown in the main steam line to the turbines. We hauled the ship around and headed towards Curacao for repairs, threading our way back through fleets of sail fishing vessels we had cleared earlier.

A silver lining was the opportunity to do a bit of victualling at Willemstad since we were out of certain provisions and strictly rationed in others. Cigarettes had run out five days earlier, smokers using pipe tobacco in roll-ups.

Good old days.
Keith

NicoRos
12th November 2015, 22:22
Good news for those who sailed on H-tankers.
4 models of 61 cm incl. base and cover are available at the workshop - The price is in Euro 515,00 incl. VAT ex R'dam.

118306

The models are only a little less detailed than my 1:125 working models.

118314

Peke
16th November 2015, 20:11
Just looked up my old photos of the 2 H boats I sailed on and as I remembered the masts were shells own brown not white as in the models. Don't know when they changed or if it was individual ships that had white. This brown also used for the cutting in on outside accomadation mid ships and aft. Never liked doing the white lead and tallow on the rigging from a chair so tried to keep on right side of mate.

Erikdepooter
21st November 2016, 15:23
I purchased one of the 15 models at Nico Ros.
Quite happy with it! Old memories came back. I can look at it for hours!

knighta
6th February 2017, 01:32
I joined the "Hinnites" in Singapore in 1969, with 3/E Alan Day, and my fellow D/A Chris Savage. The Master was Douglas Mortimer, a real gentleman. The Mate was Brian Davis-Patrick, then David Coldwell. We discharged the cargo, then headed to Bandar Mashar to load Naptha for Kobe and Nagoya. Backloaded one tank (7C) of lube oil at Yokkaichi for Singapore, discharged it there, then back to Bandar Mashar to load for Thamehaven. I remember that at Bandar Mashar, the wreck of the Italian tanker "Louisa", which had had an explosion, was being cut up. We stopped at Cape Town for bunkers, before heading for Thameshaven. We reached the Dover Strait in the early morning, and the White Cliffs emerged from the mist just as the sun rose. Our deck crew, who had been "East of Suez" for two years were all out on the Boat Deck, and I noticed that they were blinking back tears at the sight of the White Cliffs. We paid them off at Thamehaven, and headed for Fawley to load Jet Fuel for Hamburg.

oldgoat1947
19th June 2018, 10:08
Helcion 1965 Hinea 1967/8 E/A Hemicardium 1970 4/E Hadra 1971 3/E Hemitrochus 1972 2/E Hydatina 1972 2/E Haustellum 1972/3 2/E. Breif History

Jim Glover
19th June 2018, 17:39
I can remember the incident on the Valvata as it was yesterday. As 5/E on the 12-4 I was going down the ladders into the engine room when I saw the poor fireman running up the other stairs injured.The remains of his hand and boiler suit were wrapped round the shaft for the turbine rev counter.The shaft was connected with a collar with taper pins that caught his boiler suit. He had rolled up his sleeves that acted as tourniquet and as the boiler suit was ripped off it got tighter on his arm and something had to give.We steamed to nearest island and landed the poor guy ashore.I still relate this incident to all the younger guys that I work with today

joemack
6th July 2018, 02:27
Hi everyone, sailed on the Hanetia early 70's, great trip, ended up with a double DR, careful negotiation got it down to a DR.

THEDOC
30th January 2019, 11:30
I would think it nigh on impossible to jumboize a 19,000 DWT vessel to 70,000DWT. Shell did it with Z class ships from 38,000DWT

I sailed on the Zenatia in mid 70s. They were nicknamed coffin ships because of shape. Midships accomodation was cut off at deck level and placed on top of aft accommodation, so centre castle was half way up the accommodation.

hibberd
26th March 2019, 12:27
I sailed on the Zenatia in mid 70s. They were nicknamed coffin ships because of shape. Midships accomodation was cut off at deck level and placed on top of aft accommodation, so centre castle was half way up the accommodation.

I sailed on the Zaphon twice, I remember her well as we used to try to race other ships in the indian ocean on the way to the gulf, she was a fast old girl. Now on the verge of retirement its all seems so long ago now.