Curry-munching

Chris Field
25th April 2012, 10:28
I remember being given a spoon AND a fork when eating curry meals in City boats in the 1950's. (I was an apprentice from Brixton so had relatively few high-society graces). Am I now the only person in the world who still uses both these tools when dining on curry meals?

Pat Thompson
25th April 2012, 11:11
Greetings,

Nope!

woodend
25th April 2012, 11:14
I think you will find that amongst us (sn members) 'spoon and fork' users for curry would be in the majority.

Satanic Mechanic
25th April 2012, 11:15
only way to eat 'em

well that and a nan bread 'scoop'

JamesM
25th April 2012, 11:23
"only way to eat 'em

well that and a nan bread 'scoop'"

Spot'on SM.

But it never ceases to amuse me, when I am out with friends, when there they are ... troughing away .... with a knife and fork. Never done that in my life. Landlubbers!!

Chris Isaac
25th April 2012, 13:36
Me too but my wife is appalled.
But who cares?

It was expected in Clan Line but frowned upon in Union Castle.

Pat McCardle
25th April 2012, 14:30
Fork & Spoon man myself...All self taught too!

Barrie Youde
25th April 2012, 17:43
Would anybody care to advise on the ethics of the poppadam, without which no curry is complete? And which of two known methods is the proper way to eat the poppadam?

Should a piece be snapped off and then eaten delicately like a biscuit, perhaps with some chutney or other balancing on the edge?

Or should it be ground together between the palms of the hands (almost as a religious ritual) and then scattered as cremated ash on the top of the curry?

As a confirmed grind-and-sprinkle man (if I think that I can get away with it), I know which is my preferred method. Yet I admit to conforming to the apparently more acceptable method, depending on how confident I might feel.

Generally my wife, too, is appalled!

Mick Spear
25th April 2012, 17:58
I remember being given a spoon AND a fork when eating curry meals in City boats in the 1950's. (I was an apprentice from Brixton so had relatively few high-society graces). Am I now the only person in the world who still uses both these tools when dining on curry meals?

No you are not.
Mick s

Chris Isaac
25th April 2012, 18:16
Would anybody care to advise on the ethics of the poppadam, without which no curry is complete? And which of two known methods is the proper way to eat the poppadam?

Should a piece be snapped off and then eaten delicately like a biscuit, perhaps with some chutney or other balancing on the edge?

Or should it be ground together between the palms of the hands (almost as a religious ritual) and then scattered as cremated ash on the top of the curry?

As a confirmed grind-and-sprinkle man (if I think that I can get away with it), I know which is my preferred method. Yet I admit to conforming to the apparently more acceptable method, depending on how confident I might feel.

Generally my wife, too, is appalled!

Now we are getting technical, I have always favoured the Poppadom Double approach. One is crumbled (but only to the size of the average Cornflake) and sprinkled, whilst the other is used with pickle or chutney.

What I truly miss is Bombay Duck, where can it be obtained or was it only Merchant Navy issue and even then to such companies as Clan Line, Brocks, Bank Line, BP etc etc.

China hand
25th April 2012, 18:24
Now we are getting technical, I have always favoured the Poppadom Double approach. One is crumbled (but only to the size of the average Cornflake) and sprinkled, whilst the other is used with pickle or chutney.

What I truly miss is Bombay Duck, where can it be obtained or was it only Merchant Navy issue and even then to such companies as Clan Line, Brocks, Bank Line, BP etc etc.

I think the regular India trade ships people, like me, had an awful shock when they came back to Europe and were shown an " authentic" curry meal. Shudder, shudder.

Pat McCardle
25th April 2012, 18:40
What I truly miss is Bombay Duck, where can it be obtained

I believe the Food Standards people blocked the sale of such delicacy due to them finding a certain amount of bacteria that had never been seen before by man, so that was the end of sales in GB. If baked correctly, dry & crisp, it was one of my favourites too.See...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombay_duck

Barrie Youde
25th April 2012, 18:46
Amen, amen to the Bombay duck!

And many thanks for the advice! I'm sure you're right, Chris. Cornflake-size is probably a bit less brutal!

Best,

BY

Duncan112
25th April 2012, 18:47
Bombay Duck is allegedly available here..

http://www.sweetmart.co.uk/shop/details/1503/12/ethnic-foods/bombay-duck-100g

John Dryden
25th April 2012, 19:35
We had neither poppadoms or nan bread when I was at sea(Bank Line)and we never got chapatis unless we cadged the odd one or two from the aft galley.
However,the Asian crew always left a clean plate using fingers and a chapati.I tried that method once,at the behest of the Pakistani 2nd engineer and got myself in a right mess!

rodfair
26th April 2012, 00:35
The way I look at it is this. If you are at Buck House...if you havent had lessons....dont order the curry. If you do don't f$$t in front of the Queen, the Chewkie Edinburgh doesn't mind , cos he does too.
If you are at home or with friends......how do they know you are not doing it right. Whatever trips your trigger!

rodfair
26th April 2012, 00:37
But if you like... I will ask an expert!
Give me your questions.
This gentleman is a lecturer on Indian cooking, published author of 9 books on the same and a friend on another site.

John Dryden
26th April 2012, 00:43
Didn,t you just love the Indian pickles in a recycled brylcreem jar with a screw on lid?Such luxury for a week or two.

Pat Thompson
26th April 2012, 06:37
Greetings,

Chris, Bombay Duck.....couldn.t agree more it is vital to a good curry, have a look HERE (http://www.theasiancookshop.co.uk/bombay-duck-1555-p.asp) to buy some

Chris Isaac
26th April 2012, 07:50
Pat
Everyone should take a look at the the web site you suggest.
I have bookmarked it for future use.
Thanks a lot.
All I have to do know is convince my wife that it is a delicacy and made of duck.

This is a great thread

Now, where do I get old Brylcream jars?

Barrie Youde
26th April 2012, 08:04
And what shall we have to drink?

Wine, anybody? Or is it lager only? Water, of course, must be chilled!

Barrie Youde
26th April 2012, 09:08
And the table?

Starched white linen, please. (Preferably at least a fair linen cloth, as prescribed in the Book of Common Prayer.)

Silver cutlery.

Polished glasses,

For what we are about to receive, may the Lord make us truly thankful.

A nod to the Chief Steward.

Bon Appetit!

alan ward
9th May 2012, 14:03
What I truly miss is Bombay Duck, where can it be obtained

I believe the Food Standards people blocked the sale of such delicacy due to them finding a certain amount of bacteria that had never been seen before by man, so that was the end of sales in GB. If baked correctly, dry & crisp, it was one of my favourites too.See...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombay_duck

Oh aye yeah,me too no curry was complete without a dried or deepfried bombay duck crumbled over it or eaten separately or both!
I have asked my EHO`s why they were banned and yes it was because they were,as we all know,fish sundried out in the open.Probably flyblown,peed on,dog sniffed,unwashed hands used to sort them,but did we care......NO!I must have eaten hundreds,handled thousands never made me ill,mind you the bad ale I had before often made me throw up.One day I`ll tell you all again about Bacillus Cereus.

chadburn
10th May 2012, 16:02
I had a nice Lamb Rogan josh the other day, it is of course the norm these day's for the Lamb to be sourced locally or within the E.U. however, in this case the Lamb came from New Zealand and it brought back to me just how nice N.Z. Lamb was and still is.(Thumb)

Derek Roger
10th May 2012, 16:24
Best curry in Brocklebanks was when on the 12 to 4 at 3am . Tail whalla would bring a small portion with nan for the 3rd and I with a cup of tea .
Scoffed that ; did the log ; called the watch and put some Tennants on the brine header to chill .
Did the hand over and then up for a coldie . No need for breakfast ; had a snooze until 7 bell Cana .

Tony Selman
10th May 2012, 17:37
Bombay Duck, that has brought back some memories. I had completely forgotten about it as I have not seen it since I left the sea.
I agree with Chris, that site is worth bookmarking. Thanks Pat.

rodfair
10th May 2012, 23:13
Lamb over here is outside my budget! A 3 lb leg is upwards of $40! Occasionally I get some scrag end chops for about $6 for 1 serving. Tough as old boots , but tasty.

johncpugh
11th May 2012, 04:57
Should'nt we now be calling it "MUMBAI DUCK", maybe we can check IT out through a call centre.

God Bless King Victoria very good man.

trotterdotpom
11th May 2012, 12:07
Should'nt we now be calling it "MUMBAI DUCK", maybe we can check IT out through a call centre.

God Bless King Victoria very good man.

How about "Dumbai Muck".

John T

Ian6
11th May 2012, 12:25
Back on the original 'how to eat it' theme it has always surprised me that people who were raised in a 'chopsticks only' eastern environment don't seem to appreciate the benefits of western spoon and fork when they are available.

The skill of a very young chinese child in a sampan or junk alongside in H.K. as they ate rice always impressed me. However, recently in food courts in Canada, my wife and I have watched bemused as oriental customers use the plastic disposable fork and spoon to 'assemble' the food on the plate then pick up chop sticks to eat it.

Whatever benefits chop sticks may have a spoon must be better for the 'gravy'. With a chinese take-away at home we always start diligently with our chop sticks but eventually think what the hell and get on much better with spoon and fork.

Ian

trotterdotpom
11th May 2012, 20:06
Chopsticks are ok for the shovel, suck, slurp style of eating you see in the Far East, but not too practical for the western method. Having said that, these days, the genteel style of the past seems to have been replaced by fork only, elbows on the table, mouth open troughing, so it doesn't really matter if the food ends up all over your shirt.

John T

Alistair Macnab
11th May 2012, 22:13
I was always told that officers on BI and P&O ate their curries with a spoon whilst we in Bank Line used a fork, Class distinction? Or was it the difference between Calcutta-crewed ships versus Bombay-crewed (including Goanese stewards) ships?

Derek Roger
11th May 2012, 22:39
Brocklebanks always used a spoon ; with the assist of a fork . Much Quicker so we get get on with the business of running a ship .

Derek

Ron Stringer
12th May 2012, 00:10
Brocklebanks always used a spoon

Not permitted to access sharp objects?