Years ago...

jamesgpobog
8th May 2012, 22:38
I was a photo major in college back in the mid '70's, lots of B&W 35mm film. Haven't done any of that for years though.

Been using simple digital for some time now, play with the camera settings a bit to dial things in, use an editing program to crop, resize, and manipulate the images some, usually just bump contrast and saturation a little and that's it. I have never really learned how to master any Photoshop program.

My question is about digital vs film. I used a lot of filters with film for contrast mod (red filter for sky/cloud, etc). Does a digital camera in B&W mode react the same way to a colored filter? Does any software act on a B&W/desaturated pic like a colored filter would? If viable, are there any colored filters for digital pocket cameras?

Mad Landsman
10th May 2012, 20:01
I was a photo major in college back in the mid '70's, lots of B&W 35mm film. Haven't done any of that for years though.

Been using simple digital for some time now, play with the camera settings a bit to dial things in, use an editing program to crop, resize, and manipulate the images some, usually just bump contrast and saturation a little and that's it. I have never really learned how to master any Photoshop program.

My question is about digital vs film. I used a lot of filters with film for contrast mod (red filter for sky/cloud, etc). Does a digital camera in B&W mode react the same way to a colored filter? Does any software act on a B&W/desaturated pic like a colored filter would? If viable, are there any colored filters for digital pocket cameras?

That got me thinking - I had heard of a mount for 'A' size filters made by Cokin. (and I still have a stack of A size filters).

A quick search turned up This brochure (http://www.cokin.co.uk/pdf/NewCOKINBrochure.pdf)

The last time I used black and white film it was Ilford XP2 which is C41 process - So I would take it into a high street photo lab and got machine printed pictures with a random colour cast, which rather defeated the object.

When you think about digital photos rendered in B&W the same thing applies in that the sensor is intended to work primarily in Red Green and Blue; So trying to take away the colour gives the processor more to think about.

I would guess that the main filters that you could try would be Grads, special effects, neutral density, and of course, Polarising - but circular not linear with auto focus.
Pretty well everything else that we used to do with filters can be done in the computer.
If you are looking for a good freeware image program then try Gimp, it is quite simple to use and there are forums online to help.