Rosalind Castle or Clyde of Glasgow

iesha
1st February 2006, 12:55
Hello good folks of Ships Nostalgia!
In my ever-going hunt for family history and I have tracked down details of a Great Grandfather (William Stewart) on my husband's side whom was the chief engineer of the 'Rosalind Castle' (aparently a steamship of the White Star Line) and he was previously an engineer of the 'Clyde of Glasgow'.

I have had a big hunt for both vessels but to no avail. In particular I cannot find the Rosalind Castle on the fleet list of the White Star Line. I do believe she did trips from England to CapeTown?? Can anybody assist me with any photos or further details on these vessels?

Thanking you kindly in advance,
Iesha Stewart
AUSTRALIA

tanker
1st February 2006, 13:17
Welcome aboard from Italy.
Gp

Bruce Carson
1st February 2006, 13:46
Hi Iesha, welcome to the group. Enjoy the information and entertainment here.

The 'Rosalind Castle' you mention is probably the 'Roslin Castle' (2), built in 1883 by Barclay, Curle at Whiteinch, Glasgow, for the Castle Line's South African service.
Iron hull, 4,267GT, 392' x 48', compound engine, single screw, 15 knots service speed.
In 1888 she was lengthened 15 feet (to 4,487GT) and fitted with a triple expansion engine.
Utilized as a hospital ship and trooper during the Boer War.
To the Union Castle Mail SS Co. in 1900 and in 1904 sold to German owners and renamed 'Regina'.
Scrapped in Italy in 1907.

There's a small image at the following URL:
http://tinyurl.com/8m7mx
Bruce C.

R58484956
1st February 2006, 13:49
Welcome Iesha to the site enjoy it and all it has to offer.

iesha
1st February 2006, 13:53
This is a most wonderful and friendly site. Thanking you both Tanker and Bruce for your welcome wishes and assistance. I had infact wondered if the vessel name was incorrectly spelt... The Rosalin Castle you mention definately fits the criteria...so thank you again :)

Cheers!
Iesha

Gulpers
1st February 2006, 14:59
Iesha,

I suspect that "Clyde of Glasgow" probably refers to a vessel named CLYDE - registered in Glasgow.

theshiplist.com link shown below has reference to three vessels named CLYDE. Any use to you? (Thumb)

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/descriptions/ShipsCC.html


CLYDE 1841

1,841 gross tons, overall length 275ft x beam (over paddle boxes) 60ft, wooden hull, one funnel, three masts (barquentine rigged), side paddle wheel propulsion, speed 9 knots, accommodation for 100 passengers.
Built 1841 by Robert Duncan, Greenock for Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., London, she started her maiden voyage on 18th Dec. when she left Southampton for Corunna, Madeira and the West Indies. She continued West Indies voyages until 1865 when she was broken up.

CLYDE 1854

1,169 gross tons, length 249.1ft x beam 30.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 9 knots. Accommodation for Cabin and Intermediate 3rd class passengers. Launched 18th Mar.1854 by John Scott & Sons, Greenock (engines by Scott, Sinclair & Co, Glasgow), for the Clyde Screw Steam Packet Co, she started her maiden voyage from Glasgow for New York on 20th May 1854. Her second and last voyage on this route started 27th Jul.1854 and she was then used as a Crimean War Transport. On 10th Jan.1857 she resumed Glasgow - New York sailings and made one further sailing on this service on 9th Mar.1857. Her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage (first steamship sailing from the Clyde to the St.Lawrence) commenced 21st May 1857 and her last on 22nd Jul.1857. She sailed from Quebec from Glasgow under Capt.Meiklereid on 22nd Aug.1857 and on 24th Aug. was wrecked on Perroquet Reef, Gulf of St.Lawrence with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.270 by Duncan Haws]

CLYDE / SHAH NOOR 1881

4,136 gross tons, 390ft x 42.1ft, two funnels, four masts, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 123-1st and 48-2nd class passengers. Launched 14th Jun.1881 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton (Yard No.247) for Peninsular & Oriental S.N.Co, she was built for the India and Australia routes. In 1901 she was severely damaged by fire while refitting for trooping at Bombay and in July 1901 was sold to Shah S.N.Co (Essafji Tajbhoy Borah), Bombay, renamed SHAH NOOR and used on the Mecca pilgrimage trade. 1905 sold to Mazagon Powder Works, Bombay and scrapped.

Bruce Carson
1st February 2006, 16:56
I would think the odds are on the P&O 'Clyde'.
There was another Clyde built ship which straddles the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as does the 'Roslin Castle' and the P&O 'Clyde'.
The Royal Mail Steam Packet Co.'s 'Clyde' was built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow in 1890.
Steel hulled with two funnels and three masts, she measured 5,618GT, 436' x 49', single screw, 3exp, 15 knots.
She was scrapped in 1913.

http://www.simplonpc.co.uk/RMSP1.html#anchor419936

Bruce C.

arebei
1st February 2006, 19:23
welcome iesha i hope you have a nice time on this site
b.r
peter

non descript
1st February 2006, 19:35
A very warm welcome to you Iesha, you will find the good ship SN is +100A1 and with an excellent crew. Enjoy the site and all it has to offer and we look forward to your postings. Bon Voyage

iesha
1st February 2006, 22:35
Hmm, well this kind-of adds some complication for narrowing down the correct Clyde, at least...

My only clues are that William Stewart was born abt 1868, was marine engineer on the Clyde in Glasgow, and had risen to the post of chief engineer on the Rosalind (probably Roslin) Castle.

He died from Pneumonia triggered from an work accident in 1916 (aged 48). He was chief engineer for Whitely & Son of Westbourne Grove in London. Whist he and young Whitely were walking beneath a second storey loading bay, a large bale of paper fell, just missing young Whitely but striking William which had him laid up in bed for a while. The pneumonia set in when William insisted on returning to work too soon....

So I can only gather that he was probably in his early 20's (abt 1888--1890) whilst working on the Clyde and then shifted onto the Roslin Castle somewhere in the 1890's-1900...

What's your thoughts??

Gulpers
1st February 2006, 22:48
Iesha,

If my theory about the vessel's name being CLYDE and not CLYDE OF GLASGOW is correct, the only one of my previous suggestions which fits your scenario is option 3. The other two CLYDEs were destroyed before William's birth.

CLYDE / SHAH NOOR 1881

4,136 gross tons, 390ft x 42.1ft, two funnels, four masts, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 123-1st and 48-2nd class passengers. Launched 14th Jun.1881 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton (Yard No.247) for Peninsular & Oriental S.N.Co, she was built for the India and Australia routes. In 1901 she was severely damaged by fire while refitting for trooping at Bombay and in July 1901 was sold to Shah S.N.Co (Essafji Tajbhoy Borah), Bombay, renamed SHAH NOOR and used on the Mecca pilgrimage trade. 1905 sold to Mazagon Powder Works, Bombay and scrapped.

Hope this helps you narrow things down. (Thumb)