Transit of Venus

ChasD
30th May 2012, 20:28
Just in case anybody has missed mention of the upcoming event, a solar transit of Venus will take place on the 5/6th June and as this will be the last occasion for about 120yrs it might be worth having a go at photographing it - for those with the right tackle !
Best location for viewing will be Eastern Aus and Pacific, UK /Europe will catch the end at sunrise and US catch the beginning at sunset.
I managed to view the full transit in 2004 but didn't have the gear to get good pic's but it might be interesting if those with the skill and the gear could post whatever they got.
Map of what will be visible and where here
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/tran/TOV2012-Fig01.pdf

Regards Chas.

LouisB
30th May 2012, 22:34
Just in case anybody has missed mention of the upcoming event, a solar transit of Venus will take place on the 5/6th June and as this will be the last occasion for about 120yrs it might be worth having a go at photographing it - for those with the right tackle !
Best location for viewing will be Eastern Aus and Pacific, UK /Europe will catch the end at sunrise and US catch the beginning at sunset.
I managed to view the full transit in 2004 but didn't have the gear to get good pic's but it might be interesting if those with the skill and the gear could post whatever they got.
Map of what will be visible and where here
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/tran/TOV2012-Fig01.pdf

Regards Chas.

Standing by on the S. Coast Chas - have an eight inch SCT with autoguide kit and a newly borrowed eight inch sun filter. Can see sun spots so should be ok with the transit providing it's all in view. Still xperimenting with the correct eyepiece magnification and camera settings.

Regards,

LouisB. (Scribe)

Hugh Ferguson
30th May 2012, 22:51
A question! Captain Cook voyaged to Tahiti to observe a transit of Venus. The timing of the transit of Venus from one limb of the sun to the other would enable there to be a greater knowledge of the size of the sun and other factors.
Can anyone explain how?

John Rogers
31st May 2012, 00:52
Good timing for the anniversary of D-Day.

Duncan112
31st May 2012, 09:49
This site may help - I found it when looking to see if the transit would be visible in the UK (Answer yes, if you're an early riser) http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/getting-involved/measure-the-suns-distance/

Hugh Ferguson
31st May 2012, 23:07
Many thanks, Duncan, but I still don't get the reasoning!

trotterdotpom
1st June 2012, 05:29
I watched the 2004 Transit through a welding helmet. I'm all set for this one with a pair of sun proof glasses ($4 and $2 postage), a deck chair and a case of beer.

I expect I'll be watching the 2117 one from above the clouds.

The replica HMB Endeavour is doing a trip from Sydney to Lord Howe Island in order to view the Transit. There is a place called Transit Hill on Lord Howe which was used for a scientific viewing of the Transit in 1882 but I think it failed due to cloudy weather.

A great experience for all Patrick Moore and Captain Cook fans. Good luck with the weather to anyone who's interested in the event.

John T

Dickyboy
1st June 2012, 06:02
I'm interested in space, the enormity and grandeur of it is mind boggling, but I really fail to see what the interest is in watching a planet pass across the face of the Sun. I understand that it's a very rare event when viewed from Earth, but why the great interest? After all Venus, and the other planets are always passing across the face of the Sun, the only thing is that at the moment it will shortly be seen from here.

Pat Kennedy
1st June 2012, 10:35
The transit of Venus across the face of the Sun was used in 1761 to calculate the first approximation of the Astronomical Unit, the distance from the Earth to the Sun, using trigonometry.
The upcoming event is causing great excitement among those astronomers interested in identifying extra solar planets as it gives them a golden opportunity to practice and refine their techniques.
This from Exploratorium explains why;

Transits are still of interest to scientists today, because they can be used to find planets outside our solar system, also known as extrasolar planets, or exoplanets. Extrasolar planets are too distant and too dim to be viewed directly, but when one passes in front of (that is, transits) its parent star, it blocks a little bit of the star's light. (The dimming is detectable but extremely slight; just 1 percent for a giant planet like Jupiter and .01 percent for a planet the size of Earth.) Scientists analyzing the changing light from stars can not only identify the presence of a planet, but can also determine the planet's size, temperature, and atmospheric composition. The transit of Venus provides great practice for these scientists, allowing them to track the optical changes that take place during a transit.

trotterdotpom
1st June 2012, 11:30
Dickyboy, when you did the Oodnadatta Track, did you see Lake Eyre and get a kick out of it being full of water? A rare event that I'd like to see sometime .... same as the Transit. However, if holds no interest for you, don't look. I consider football a load of sh1t, so I don't watch it.

John T

Hugh Ferguson
1st June 2012, 11:40
Dickyboy, when you did the Oodnadatta Track, did you see Lake Eyre and get a kick out of it being full of water? A rare event that I'd like to see sometime .... same as the Transit. However, if holds no interest for you, don't look. I consider football a load of sh1t, so I don't watch it.

John T

Precisely!

Dickyboy
1st June 2012, 11:56
Dickyboy, when you did the Oodnadatta Track, did you see Lake Eyre and get a kick out of it being full of water? A rare event that I'd like to see sometime .... same as the Transit. However, if holds no interest for you, don't look. I consider football a load of sh1t, so I don't watch it.

John T

Hi John, actually Lake Eyre (South) was covered in salt when I saw it, and to be honest I found that much more interesting than had it been full of water. Afterall, I've seen lakes full of water in many places, especially in the UK. Lakes of water aren't rare to me, but lakes of salt are.
As for the Venus transit, I'll be much more interested in anything they learn from the event than the event itself.(Thumb)

John Rogers
1st June 2012, 14:45
Some info on the event.

http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/last-transit-of-venus-in-21st-century-will-happen-in-june-2012

Duncan112
1st June 2012, 17:17
Hugh, just found this whilst searching for Halley's original paper (I must get a life) Google translate does a reasonable job!!

http://www.venus-transit.de/Halley/index.html

All links nicely in with Harrison and Kendall and their chronometers

Pointed out to Dad this morning that if he got up early on Tuesday he would be one of the few people to have seen both transits so he got his sextant down and has gone to his caravan for the weekend in the hope of clear skies.

Interesting report in today's D Telegraph on the Transit - including a photograph alleging it occurred yesterday. I have written to the Editor asking that the same consideration be given to printing the lotto and financial data 5 days early then I can retire!!