How Many days to Cross the Pacific

ecb
2nd June 2012, 02:01
I was on the Port Nelson went through Suez to Cairns and then across from Sydney to The Panama Canal, we were Faily empty on way out, what would be the Approx passage time for both Directions I think it was about 17 days to Panama would that have been right?
ecb

spongebob
2nd June 2012, 02:08
Ecb, Auckland to Panama on RMS Rangitane in 1957 was 18 days including a 10 hour stop at Pitcairn.

Bob

Pat McCardle
2nd June 2012, 08:22
Timaru to Panama was also 18 days at 18knots, south about, on Somerset in 1978.

Ron Stringer
2nd June 2012, 08:32
City of Lucknow, 1962 service speed 15/16 knots

02-Dec-62 Sailed from Cristobal
23-Dec-62 Arrived Gladstone, Queensland, Australia.

sparkie2182
2nd June 2012, 10:41
Depends on what ur speed is.

:)

.................."start the car!!!".

ecb
2nd June 2012, 12:35
Thanks for replies,I would'nt know the speed I was "PEELING SPUDS"! thought May be one of he Navigation fellers Ex Port Line May Know? on reflection There was a Chart In The Alley Way that they put the Daily Progress" But That was In The Mists Of Time"
regards
ecb

jimthehat
3rd June 2012, 22:09
Thanks for replies,I would'nt know the speed I was "PEELING SPUDS"! thought May be one of he Navigation fellers Ex Port Line May Know? on reflection There was a Chart In The Alley Way that they put the Daily Progress" But That was In The Mists Of Time"
regards
ecb

maplebank and ettrick bank 35 days Panama to brisbane,and we could not afford to put a chart in the alley.

Aberdonian
3rd June 2012, 23:19
Laganbank: Dep. Panama 19 Jul 56: Arr. Sydney 12 Aug 56.

The 24 day passage included several diversions in order to chase rain clouds for fresh water.

Aberdonian

Gareth Jones
3rd June 2012, 23:37
Crossed the Pacific quite a few times - never actually timed it but it felt like about 27 months !!!

Mike S
4th June 2012, 02:03
28 days on the old Durham in 1957........twin screw one at a time.

Next voyage she finished up in Galveston and after 6 months there repairing two broken crankshafts she was much betterer.

She was even able to make 14 knots on occasions...........(Jester)

ecb
4th June 2012, 03:22
I was on a tanker loading in iran and we were watching a Border Tanker leaving and one of the Fellers said he had been talking to one of the crew who said they were going to some were in South America and would take "Six weeks" to get there! thank God we were only going Mombassa!
ecb

JET
4th June 2012, 06:18
Bob,
Can't remember the exact time but it was a bit longer than 18 days on the Rangitane in Jan/Feb 1956 when the Port engine crankshaft twisted.

Regards, John

holland25
4th June 2012, 07:08
I think about 28 days in 1957 on the Saxon Star, 11 knots downhill and with a following wind.Panama to Wellington.The only contact I had was one of the old emigrant ships Captain ??.I dont think she was going much faster.

Sabastapol
4th June 2012, 15:30
I was on the Port Nelson went through Suez to Cairns and then across from Sydney to The Panama Canal, we were Faily empty on way out, what would be the Approx passage time for both Directions I think it was about 17 days to Panama would that have been right?
ecb

Thought I'd throw a tanker in the pot as I don't see too many.
Shell tanker 'Varicella' 33,000 Tons of oceanic splendour. Topped up the bunkers in Singapore, trundled across the Pacific to Long beach, California. Left 30/01/61 Arrived 22/02/61. (Fly)

A.D.FROST
4th June 2012, 15:45
Depends whats pushing you along a Doxford or the tide sometimes it was quicker(if only you could get out and push)

Mike S
6th June 2012, 12:06
I can relate to that last post......
SS Dulverton.........800 bhp from an ancient steam 4 cyl compound engine which gave 9 knots.
Departing Derby on a king tide..........21 knots!
Tides rule!! (==D)

R396040
6th June 2012, 16:29
I was on a tanker loading in iran and we were watching a Border Tanker leaving and one of the Fellers said he had been talking to one of the crew who said they were going to some were in South America and would take "Six weeks" to get there! thank God we were only going Mombassa!
ecb

Remember on the British Might ,Abadan to Wellington NZ it took us 35 days,yes thirty five. Wasnt nonstop though as we were broken down more often than not, water rationing from departure day till arrival.This was 1948 two nights and departed Christmas Eve for the Persian Gulf as it was then called. Happy days............
Stuart

Dan.n
6th June 2012, 19:29
16 days QM2, San Francisco to Sydney with a day in Honolulu, PagoPago,and Auckland.
Dan

gadgee
10th July 2012, 21:03
Sydney to Balboa via Auckland/Rarotonga/Tahiti/Acapulco on Shaw Savill's Northern Star in 1974 was 22 days. The other way Balboa to Melbourne via Tahiti/Rarotonga/Auckland/Wellington was 24 days.

ecb
10th July 2012, 22:27
My Father had Been to Australia and New Zealand but Spent most of his Time in the Cunard one time he said to me "I WOULD RATHER SCUBB THE TOWN HALL STEPS THAN CROSS THE PACIFIC AGAIN"!
ecb

ericfisher
11th July 2012, 02:49
Remember on the British Might ,Abadan to Wellington NZ it took us 35 days,yes thirty five. Wasnt nonstop though as we were broken down more often than not, water rationing from departure day till arrival.This was 1948 two nights and departed Christmas Eve for the Persian Gulf as it was then called. Happy days............
Stuart

Also on British Might. 1951. Singapore to Los Angeles 4 weeks. Ran out of fags. L.A. to Dunedin NZ. 6 weeks. Auckland NZ to Panama forget but few weeks. Was all part of round the World trip, 6 Feb.'51- 21 Dec.'51. Great time. Yeah Stuart, Happy days they were Eric Fisher

vangooler
11th July 2012, 23:50
I think about 28 days in 1957 on the Saxon Star, 11 knots downhill and with a following wind.Panama to Wellington.The only contact I had was one of the old emigrant ships Captain ??.I dont think she was going much faster.

Did the same trip same ship from Aug.55-Jan.56. Crossed the bar in L'pool and the engines went on fire.Towed into Dublin for repairs. Then we got stuck in Cristobal for 10 days for more engine repairs. Not even a drop of ice water on board. If you got 11knots they must have done a good repair job. I don't think we got above 9.

holland25
12th July 2012, 11:16
Did the same trip same ship from Aug.55-Jan.56. Crossed the bar in L'pool and the engines went on fire.Towed into Dublin for repairs. Then we got stuck in Cristobal for 10 days for more engine repairs. Not even a drop of ice water on board. If you got 11knots they must have done a good repair job. I don't think we got above 9.

You may be right about 9 knots, we spent a day in Cristobal on the way back.The engine wouldn't re-start.

Jockshuffler
20th September 2012, 09:41
Ecb, Auckland to Panama on RMS Rangitane in 1957 was 18 days including a 10 hour stop at Pitcairn.

Bob
Hi ya,So what do you reckon the time to get from Southampton to Auckland on the Rangitane in 58'?Also do you have any pics on board,at sea etc around 58/59'.If so could you post them please?Ta.

Cheers,

Jock

Jockshuffler
30th December 2012, 03:48
Thanks for the info,I was almost six so just wanted to get some idea of time on the journey etc as only had odd recollections of trip .

Derek Roger
30th December 2012, 15:36
Mosss Tanker Lucigen ; Panama to Okinawa 26 days with 19 breakdowns or was it 19 days with 26 breakdowns ?? Either way it was quite a voyage .

Tom(Tucker)Kirby
30th December 2012, 15:39
Depends on what ur speed is.

:)

.................."start the car!!!".

The Malan ex Malancha of Brocklebanks took 30 days from Panama to Yokohama, fuel probs and what a lousy engine.(Pint)

WilliamH
30th December 2012, 16:58
I once did a passage Japan to Vancouver on a reefer averaging 24 knots, I can't remember how long it took but I had jet lag when we reached Vancouver.

Michael Taylor
30th December 2012, 19:44
Ellermans 24 days Panama to Breakfast Creek (Brisbane).

Somerton
9th July 2014, 12:02
Sailed on the Port Vindex. Depart Napier on 28 th Feb 1959 bound to Dunkirk via Panama and Curacoa for bunkers. Arrived in Dunkirk on 2 nd April. 33 days. I dont remember the time from Napier to Panama.
Regards.
Alex C.

Ron Stringer
9th July 2014, 15:05
Ellermans 24 days Panama to Breakfast Creek (Brisbane).

Michael, you should have been on a steamer (see Post #4 this thread) (Jester)

Michael Taylor
9th July 2014, 19:04
Michael, you should have been on a steamer (see Post #4 this thread) (Jester)

Ron....must have been at economical speed. I made that passage a number of times but I believe the 24 days was on the Adelaide in 70/71

saudisid
9th July 2014, 19:41
Panama to Brisbane Pilot 7777 via Fatu Iva / Niue / Eua 18Days at 17.5 Kts in City of Brisbane and City of Sydney. In Brisbane [ Steamer abt 1554 tons cons and in Sydney [ Motor abt 780 tons ]

Binnacle
9th July 2014, 21:28
Panama to Sydney (Route 501) 7,697 miles

Panama to Pitcairn 3,639'
Thence to 150 meridian position 1,092
Thence to Three Kings Rocks 1879
Thence to Sydney 1,087

Source - Ocean Passages for the World
(Published by order of the Lord Commissioners of the Admiralty)

ECB
That will give you an idea how many tatties you have to peel.

tiachapman
16th July 2014, 11:33
forever on the S/S STANREALM

ernhelenbarrett
19th July 2014, 08:07
On Tweedbank/GBYC built 1931 (same year as me) Panama to OZ 45 days,
spent the nights hurling wooden hatch wedges at the rats as they ran past. Mind you , she did have the lattice work derricks for growing ivy on these long sea voyages.!!!
Ern Barrett

John Briggs
19th July 2014, 08:16
Used to take us a month from Panama to Japan.
I remember it well as on departure Panama I gave up smoking.
On arrival Yokohama I was informed that I had been promoted to Master and that night ashore celebrating I took up smoking again.

sidsal
19th July 2014, 21:53
21days Panama Canal to Tahiti via Marquesas ,Rangiroa,Tuamotus in 250 ton sailing ketch in 1985. Great voyage in luxury - owner not on board. Plenty of cold beers and BBQ ,s.

saintfield
24th November 2014, 03:12
distance Panama to Auckland 6500 nm at 17 knots = 16 days , at 16 knots = 17 days.
Port Chalmers to Zeebrugge 11446 nm, 28 days at 17 knots.
regards
saintfield.

David Campbell
24th November 2014, 04:26
1964. MV Naess Clipper. Tobata, Japan to Caldera and Chaneral in Chile 30 days and 31 back to Tobata. 35.441 dwt Bulk Carrier with a Mitsubishi 9UEC Diesel Engine 13000bhp, 15 knots.

NoR
24th November 2014, 09:50
Laganbank: Dep. Panama 19 Jul 56: Arr. Sydney 12 Aug 56.

The 24 day passage included several diversions in order to chase rain clouds for fresh water.

Aberdonian

I remember chasing rain squalls for fresh water in the Cape York. We hadn't loaded FW at Pulau Bukom when calling for bunkers (Durban - Japan with sugar) due to a cholera epidemic which would have placed us in quarantine on arrival in Tokyo. We cleaned out 40 gallon drums to collect FW from the scupper downfalls. I think we were ok for drinking water, but had one bucket a day for washing. Once we were cleared into Tokyo the water was turned on again so we could all have a long overdue shower before going ashore.

Bill Greig
24th November 2014, 12:55
On M.V. Heythrop bulk carrier, we were 42 days from Dampier NW Aussie to Dunkirk France at maximum economical speed of 10 knots, water rationing when we left Dampier as most of the fresh water was pumped over the side to get an extra 100 tons of iron ore cargo. Two days in Dunkirk the away again.
Bill

Julian Calvin
26th November 2014, 08:34
Bahia Blanca (Argentina) to Yokohama on BF bulker 'Hector' on reduced speed fuel saving.
Master asked for distance via either Cape. Was only 25 miles different. Went by Cape of Good Hope. 38 days.
Later Vancouver to Rio via Cape Horn on same vessel. 36 days plus three weeks at anchor.
Decision made to come ashore.

Bill Greig
26th November 2014, 09:17
Bahia Blanca (Argentina) to Yokohama on BF bulker 'Hector' on reduced speed fuel saving.
Master asked for distance via either Cape. Was only 25 miles different. Went by Cape of Good Hope. 38 days.
Later Vancouver to Rio via Cape Horn on same vessel. 36 days plus three weeks at anchor.
Decision made to come ashore.

Likewise Julian. Heythrop was my last trip, I didn't go to sea to see the sea!
Cheers
Bill

RogertheLodger
26th November 2014, 10:19
Port Line's 'Port Sydney', October, 1957......Napier to KGV, London (including stop for bunkers in Aruba)...26 days.

marconiman
26th November 2014, 12:24
mv Redbrook/MARX, single ship company, D L Street of Cardiff.

30 days exactly from Vancouver to Kobe. Numerous breakdowns and loss of electric power, oil steaming lights aloft and ships radio on batteries at times.

No ships sighted but some very large birds, albatross I guess. Radio 500 k/cs silent most of the time. Bunkers empty on arrival in Japan, perfect timing!

trotterdotpom
26th November 2014, 13:52
Not a lot of Albatri between Vancouver and Japan, Marconiman. They are southern hemisphere birds although there are some that come north but don't venture far from the equator I believe.

Maybe they were shitehawks.

John T

holland25
26th November 2014, 19:57
mv Redbrook/MARX, single ship company, D L Street of Cardiff.

30 days exactly from Vancouver to Kobe. Numerous breakdowns and loss of electric power, oil steaming lights aloft and ships radio on batteries at times.

No ships sighted but some very large birds, albatross I guess. Radio 500 k/cs silent most of the time. Bunkers empty on arrival in Japan, perfect timing!

See posts 22 and 23,looks like she didn't get any better. David Street might have thought that Blue Star had sold him a pup.

Wallace Slough
26th November 2014, 20:10
On a transpacific Mariner Class ship in the 60's with a cruising speed of 20+ knots, I recall about 10 days from San Francisco to Yokohama. Westbound during the winter we'd often rhumb line straight across or even drop down to 35 degrees North or further south depending on weather, whereas Eastbound we'd normally Great Circle. If we hit bad weather home bound the seas were normally from astern and we'd usually be OK. Eastbound passage was a little faster on the way home on a GC, but it's been too many years ago to recall the passage time. I recall that we used a firm called Ocean Routes that would recommend the passage route based upon weather forecasts.

marconiman
8th December 2014, 16:46
Not a lot of Albatri between Vancouver and Japan, Marconiman. They are southern hemisphere birds although there are some that come north but don't venture far from the equator I believe.

Maybe they were shitehawks.

John T

LOL re the Shitehawks, maybe they were lost as normally frequenting the Indian Coast.

marconiman
8th December 2014, 17:04
See posts 22 and 23,looks like she didn't get any better. David Street might have thought that Blue Star had sold him a pup.

Yes, that was the old lady, ex Saxon Star. D L Street ran her for 4 years before selling to Greek owners who promptly 'beached' her in the Black Sea. I did that last voyage of 12 months during '64/'65.

The previous one was 2 years 4 months, I was told the crew had the option of being flown home after 2 years, as in the articles, but they stayed. When you've been away that long what's another 4 months.

The voyages are documented in Capt Heaton's book, The story of a Deep Sea Tramp. I recall at the time I was aboard everyone said you could write a book about the experience and they have.

p.g.gregory
21st August 2015, 18:30
I was on the Port Nelson went through Suez to Cairns and then across from Sydney to The Panama Canal, we were Faily empty on way out, what would be the Approx passage time for both Directions I think it was about 17 days to Panama would that have been right?
ecb
I crossed on the R.M.S Rangatine, Panama/wellington which took 17 days. One stop, Pitcairn for a few hours.

sternchallis
11th June 2016, 15:09
maplebank and ettrick bank 35 days Panama to brisbane,and we could not afford to put a chart in the alley.
They always used to say about Bank Line ships was, 12,000 tons, 12 ton a day and 12 knots, perhaps.

stehogg
11th June 2016, 16:21
Did it 4 times in two years on the Ulysees,21 days from Nagoya to Panama,but always remember the 1st crossing,took a little longer when losing a blade off the propellor half way across north of Hawaii.Slow steam to Pearl Harbour drydock them 12 days of heaven while the yanks replaced the damaged prop with the spare!![=P]

jimthehat
11th June 2016, 22:56
They always used to say about Bank Line ships was, 12,000 tons, 12 ton a day and 12 knots, perhaps.

The maple bank was a ex Sam boat steam and 10 knots on a good day and approx7000t gross

BobClay
11th June 2016, 23:10
I remember crossing the Pacific from Panama to Auckland on a Bank Line Ship in the early 70's and it took us about three weeks. What I remember mostly about it is taking nav warnings about French Nuclear tests at the time, although I don't think they affected our track.
The other thing I remember is going onto the bridge each day and looking at our plot on the chart, which seemed to be moving with some sort of Einsteinien time dilation effect.
Queer the things that stay in your memory ....

(EEK)

Aberdonian
11th June 2016, 23:26
The maple bank was a ex Sam boat steam and 10 knots on a good day and approx7000t gross

The Tielbank, another Sam boat, crossed the Pacific from Nagasaki to New Plymouth NZ, via Nauru Island
a 5335 mile passage with a general average speed of 8.95 knots took 26 days.

Keith

BobClay
12th June 2016, 00:49
Oooops sorry, should have given more info. The ship was the Weybank, the year 1971.
We coasted around Kiwi discharging cargo ending up in Bluff. Then we went up to Fiji to load brown sugar for Liverpool. The trip from Fiji to Liverpool, (again via Panama) was about a month as I remember it, a bloody long month when you know you're going to pay off a Bank Boat (long trips were the norm in those days.)
You have to love General Cargo Ships, they carried just about anything that existed (except maybe for Dark Matter, and I've always figured Bank Line would have quoted for that one way or another) and went to all kinds of places.
Maybe it's me, but box boats just don't have the same appeal.

spongebob
12th June 2016, 01:27
I crossed on the R.M.S Rangatine, Panama/wellington which took 17 days. One stop, Pitcairn for a few hours.

Same ship ,same ports , same Pitcairn call October 1957 , 18 days

Bob

tiachapman
12th June 2016, 04:54
It Seemed Foever

Somerton
12th June 2016, 07:33
On the Port Vindex in 1959 it was 33 days from Napier to Dunkirk through Panama and Curacoa for bunkers .
Alex .c .

funnelstays
12th June 2016, 19:06
l paid off the Cap Pamas in San Antonio Chile 14 th July 2014,flew to Hong Kong and joined the Monte Olivia on the 19th and departed Hong Kong to Manzanillo 25 days ecconomic speed.

george e mitchell
12th June 2016, 21:22
This is not about the pacific ocean which I had crossed many times in Shaw Savill vessels, I remember the fastest would have been the Megantic at about 16 days and the slowest was the Waiwera. (one engine at a time, many times.)
I had been standing by the building of the MSV THAROS in Hiroshima. JAPAN.
Upon completion I went on leave, and rejoined her in Singapore. She was registered in London as a ship. but was actually an oil rig without the drilling
equipment. Being too wide for the canals we had to go from Singapore to Tenereriffe via Indian and Atlantic oceans, with a short stop at Cape Town, for a crew change, we were self propelled with four 3000 hp azimuth propellers and 7 x 2000 hp diesel generators.the only two people who were not relieved was the Chief Engineer and myself 2nd eng. we then proceded to Tenerieffe. That part of the tow took 61 days. We also had tug assist, when we got 5 knots we would celebrate. the ships (rig ) main purpose was a floating hotel,350 people and well equipped work shops and heavy lift crane. a fire fighting capacity of two 3000 hp fire pumps. These were only used in anger once when the PIPER ALPHA was destroyed by fire with great loss of life in the north sea. I also did another tug assisted tow as Chief Engineer on an oil rig. she was Liberian registered. that tow was from Korea . via Capetown, this time I never got relieved till we arrived in English channel. I don't have the actual dates on this one close to 90 days. They gave me 3 weeks off before starting two on two off for the next twenty years, said a big NO to any more tows.She was also self propelled
regards George Mitchell

george e mitchell
12th June 2016, 21:30
This is not about the pacific ocean which I had crossed many times in Shaw Savill vessels, I remember the fastest would have been the Megantic at about 16 days and the slowest was the Waiwera. (one engine at a time, many times.)
I had been standing by the building of the MSV THAROS in Hiroshima. JAPAN.
Upon completion I went on leave, and rejoined her in Singapore. She was registered in London as a ship. but was actually an oil rig without the drilling
equipment. Being too wide for the canals we had to go from Singapore to Tenereriffe via Indian and Atlantic oceans, with a short stop at Cape Town, for a crew change, we were self propelled with four 3000 hp azimuth propellers and 7 x 2000 hp diesel generators.the only two people who were not relieved was the Chief Engineer and myself 2nd eng. we then proceded to Tenerieffe. That part of the tow took 61 days. We also had tug assist, when we got 5 knots we would celebrate. the ships (rig ) main purpose was a floating hotel,350 people and well equipped work shops and heavy lift crane. a fire fighting capacity of two 3000 hp fire pumps. These were only used in anger once when the PIPER ALPHA was destroyed by fire with great loss of life in the north sea. I also did another tug assisted tow as Chief Engineer on an oil rig. she was Liberian registered. that tow was from Korea . via Capetown, this time I never got relieved till we arrived in English channel. I don't have the actual dates on this one close to 90 days. They gave me 3 weeks off before starting two on two off for the next twenty years, said a big NO to any more tows.She was also self propelled
regards George Mitchell

John Dryden
12th June 2016, 21:44
Aye,hope you got well paid for it George and had a few hours on deck.

george e mitchell
12th June 2016, 22:52
to John Dryden. I did get very well paid for that as I was being paid in American
Dollars, The exchange rate at that time was one dollar to the pound, Downside the top rate of income tax was 95 % in the 1970s The end of the voyage was late February and they paid my normal salary plus leave due in the month of march, I asked if it could be held over till the APRIL paycheck. They told me that was not possible I would have taken time off and get a tax rebate.
Irefused any more tows.
landing me with a tax bill of over 50OO for that month It also Ii included leave time while in shipyard. I challenged it. Was told because its registered as a British ship I had to pay the tax as I had not been out af the country for a year,

graeme murray
13th June 2016, 20:14
Sailed Panama Canal after hitting Pacific side Lock Gate Chain on 23rd. September 1966. Sailed to and through (no stopping) Galapagos Islands. Arrived Cairns 20th October 1966. You do the math.

Ship ran aground entering Cairns (with Pilot Mr. Reed) Partially discharged Cargo of Phosphate. Berthed four days later. Arbitrarily, you can add this to the total number of days.

Ship: Baron Jedburgh. Budump, Budump (Doxford).

Graeme.