Midway

Bob Murdoch
4th June 2012, 07:47
Today, June,4th, is the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway. This battle can be taken as the turning point of the war in the Pacific. It stopped the Japanese advance. The first all carrier battle as well?
Cheers Bob

John Cassels
4th June 2012, 10:26
Today, June,4th, is the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Midway. This battle can be taken as the turning point of the war in the Pacific. It stopped the Japanese advance. The first all carrier battle as well?
Cheers Bob

Sorry Bob , but I thought Coral Sea was the first . Certainly the
first when the opposing fleets never sighted each other .

Bob Murdoch
4th June 2012, 11:35
Yes John, I think you are correct. That is why I put a ? on it. Although I think that a Japanese sub may have taken part in it also. However not entirely sure on that.
Cheers Bob

Klaatu83
4th June 2012, 13:32
Coral Sea was the first battle where opposing fleets never sighted each other. It was a tactical draw, but a strategic victory for the Allies, because it prevented the Japanese from occupying all of New Guinea and stopped their advance towards Australia. Nevertheless, the Japanese fleet came through that engagement still in possession of the operational initiative.

As with The Battle of Britain, it might also be said of The Battle of Midway that "it was not the end, nor even the beginning of the end, but it was the end of the beginning". It certainly deserves to be ranked with El Alamein and Stalingrad as one of the pivotal battles of World War II. On the morning of June 4th 1942 the Japanese outnumbered the American fleet, and possessed the initiative to do anything they wished, anywhere in the Pacific. On the other hand, the U.S. Navy was outnumbered, on the defensive, and whatever action they were able to take was dictated entirely by the actions of the enemy (as was the case in the coral Sea). By the time the Battle of Midway was over the strategic situation in the Pacific had been completely reversed. Although the war was far from over, the operational initiative had gone completely over to the U.S., and the Japanese would never again regain it.

The Japanese lost far more than merely four aircraft carriers. They lost most of the highly-trained crews who manned those carriers, along with the equally highly-trained airmen who manned their aircraft. They were never able to entirely replace either. On the other hand, although the U.S. Navy lost the USS Yorktown (CV-5), most of her personnel were rescued, and many were actually assigned later on to the new USS Yorktown (CV-10).

JoeQ
4th June 2012, 13:56
As with The Battle of Britain, it might also be said of The Battle of Midway that "it was not the end, nor even the beginning of the end, but it was the end of the beginning". It certainly deserves to be ranked with El Alamein and Stalingrad as one of the pivotal battles of World War II.

Isn't that a quote from Churchill after the battle of El Alamein in October 1942 rather than the Battle of Britain?

John Cassels
4th June 2012, 18:31
Midway for the most part was a close run thing. The battle ( and the future of
the naval outcome ) was actually decided in the space of about 5 minutes.

We should not forget that the US lost the greater part of the torpedo squadrons
Japanese CAP aircraft were at such a low altitude dealing with the torpedo
aircraft that the dive bombers were able to inflict so much damage without
being bothered.

Full and by
4th June 2012, 19:09
The air attack was not properly coordinated as the various squadrons failed to rendezvous, leading to the sacrifice of the torpedo planes. But what an awesome sight it must have been, all those flat-tops exposed and covered with ordnance as they raced to re-arm from their land attack mission.

What won the day, along with the bravery and sacrifice, was the intelligence coup pulled off at Pearl which told us where their next objective was. Had Nimitz succumbed to pressure from Washington to guard the west coast, Midway would not have held and stopping the Jap advance would have cost that much more in men and materiel.

Long gone
5th June 2012, 21:23
Coral Sea was the first battle where opposing fleets never sighted each other. It was a tactical draw, but a strategic victory for the Allies, because it prevented the Japanese from occupying all of New Guinea and stopped their advance towards Australia. Nevertheless, the Japanese fleet came through that engagement still in possession of the operational initiative.

As with The Battle of Britain, it might also be said of The Battle of Midway that "it was not the end, nor even the beginning of the end, but it was the end of the beginning". It certainly deserves to be ranked with El Alamein and Stalingrad as one of the pivotal battles of World War II. On the morning of June 4th 1942 the Japanese outnumbered the American fleet, and possessed the initiative to do anything they wished, anywhere in the Pacific. On the other hand, the U.S. Navy was outnumbered, on the defensive, and whatever action they were able to take was dictated entirely by the actions of the enemy (as was the case in the coral Sea). By the time the Battle of Midway was over the strategic situation in the Pacific had been completely reversed. Although the war was far from over, the operational initiative had gone completely over to the U.S., and the Japanese would never again regain it.

The Japanese lost far more than merely four aircraft carriers. They lost most of the highly-trained crews who manned those carriers, along with the equally highly-trained airmen who manned their aircraft. They were never able to entirely replace either. On the other hand, although the U.S. Navy lost the USS Yorktown (CV-5), most of her personnel were rescued, and many were actually assigned later on to the new USS Yorktown (CV-10).

Which one? There were two battles; one in July 1942 at which General Auchinleck stopped Rommel in his tracks and was then sacked because Churchill lost a by-election; and the one in October 1942 at which Montgomery completed the victory over a vastly-outnumbered Rommel

The parallels between Dowding after the BoB and Auchinleck after 1st Alamien are striking

Sorry for going off-topic, the events of July 1942 in the Western Desert are quite conveniently airbrushed out of history, because it doesn't suuit the narrative.