USS TEXAS - trying to sink again

Full and by
18th June 2012, 22:38
Well, the Texas, oldest remaining dreadnought in the world is trying rather hard to sink...again. From sailing with Beatty during WWI, to blasting away fortifications on Okinawa she served long and with distinction, only to sink at her moorings in a brackish river in Galveston. She was actually sunk for decades, and losing below the waterline integrity once more. Some splitting seams are said to have rags stuffed into them.

http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2012/06/14/hundred-year-old-battleship-texas-springs-leak/

We have three such historic vessels here I can think of that are in rather dire straits, the Olympia and the United States being the other two. The old Olympia was the flagship of Dewey in '98, from whose observation platform he uttered the famous phrase, "You may fire when ready Gridley" which commenced a very bad afternoon for the Spanish armada. Her hull is in such an awful condition, well, suffice to say she has been continuously in the water since 1945 I believe.

And the United States, last Blue Riband holder, able to steam some twenty knots astern, is a sight no patron of once proud ships would wish to behold - although it is said her hull remains sound.

What do we do? There is talk of permanent drydock for both Texas and Olympia, which is really all that is left for them save artificial reef or scrapping. Difficult to imagine allowing such history to ruin after having held onto them for so long.

Rogerfrench
19th June 2012, 05:19
5 years ago the citizens of Texas approved $25 million to address Texas's issues, but nothing has yet happened. Now it is estimated that $50 million is needed.
As a resident of Texas, I wish somebody would get their finger out of their rear end and either stick it in the leak or do something about it.

Full and by
19th June 2012, 13:22
I wonder if it would be possible to drydock her on the spot; dam the section up and drain/bypass it. Fairly monumental undertaking by any measure to get that ship permanently high and dry. I suppose the EPA would find some endangered toad or mosquito...