Cornish Pasty

len mazza
17th July 2012, 23:15
Hi,
Bought two of the above recently here in Napier,only resemblence to the real thing was the shape,can you still get a decent on in the UK.

Cheers, Len.

redgreggie
18th July 2012, 10:22
yeah, Ginsters do a fairly good one, though Marks and Spencer are, I guess, as good as anyone, any of their food is good, followed closely by Waitrose.










ray..........................in Batley.

Robert Hilton
18th July 2012, 10:48
Try one from Pasty Presto, or two if you can eat them.

cajef
18th July 2012, 11:04
You can get plenty here in Cornwall, the real thing not imitations.(Eat)

Ron Stringer
18th July 2012, 11:23
You can get plenty here in Cornwall, the real thing not imitations.(Eat)

When I was living there in 1966, general agreement was that the best pasties in the Plymouth area were sold by Ivor Dewdney in Plymouth. I didn't try all of the alternatives but Ivor Dewdney's were very good indeed.

cajef
18th July 2012, 11:42
When I was living there in 1966, general agreement was that the best pasties in the Plymouth area were sold by Ivor Dewdney in Plymouth. I didn't try all of the alternatives but Ivor Dewdney's were very good indeed.

I am in the far west near Falmouth, the best pasties are the ones from small independent bakeries, there are always certain local ones that have good reputations if you are in the know.:)

frangio
18th July 2012, 12:32
Nearly all the ones from supermarkets, including M & S the last time I had one (admittedly probably 30 years ago), use minced meat so are not true Cornish Pasties.

After experiencing the real thing and then introducing my wife to them on a holiday in Cornwall we decided we didn't want the rubbish ones anymore. So the best way to get real Cornish Pasties here in Scotland is to make them yourself. Actually very easy to make as there are only a handful of ingredients in a true Cornish Pastie! Also fills the house with a lovely aroma!

ray1buck1
18th July 2012, 14:32
If you want a rally good authentic Cornish Pasties 2 that I favour is the McFaddens butcher in St Just baked on the premises and a small baker in Marizion they are a meal in them selves

Barrie Youde
18th July 2012, 15:54
Recipe, anybody?

cajef
18th July 2012, 16:00
Recipe, anybody?

Will this do?

http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/images/recipe.pdf

Barrie Youde
18th July 2012, 16:16
Looks great!

Very many thanks.

BY

Mad Landsman
18th July 2012, 16:20
If you are a vegetarian (whatever that might include) then you can leave out the beef and make a 'tiddy oggy'.

Barrie Youde
18th July 2012, 16:26
Thanks for that, too!

Had heard of tiddy oggy. Now I know what it is!

kevjacko
18th July 2012, 19:06
There's a brilliant Cornish Pasty shop in Keswick of all places at the bottom of the market place, although I'm not sure what theyre calling them at the mo after all this stupid carry on about Cornish Pasties having to be made in Cornwall 'I swear' have people not got anything else to worry about than what other folk call their pasties?

My view is that the more folk who make a pasty and call it 'Cornish' the more it will pique peoples curiosity to visit Cornwall and sample the real thing (spending their hard earned wonga in the local economy to boot). Now my local bakers just call them 'pasties' dont look, taste, smell any different than they did before some small minded bunch of yokels decided the word Cornish was theirs, and theirs alone, pathetic......

Ah well that's me rant of the day oot the way, I'm off to enjoy the rest of the evening, might even bake mesel a pastie or two and call it what I damned well please.

Barrie Youde
18th July 2012, 19:11
Hi, Kevjacko!

Hope you might try selling your pasties at Tebay - best service-station on the motorway network!

B

Nigel Wing
18th July 2012, 19:29
Anne's Pasties on the Lizard, cannot be beaten. Have a look online.
Nigel

cajef
18th July 2012, 19:33
before some small minded bunch of yokels decided the word Cornish was theirs, and theirs alone, pathetic......



Oy!!!!!! who are you calling small minded yokels, thats your card marked mate, you will be turned back at the border.:p

GEORDIE LAD
18th July 2012, 22:01
Will this do?

http://www.cornishpastyassociation.co.uk/images/recipe.pdf

Thanks for this,but as a Colonial,what is Swede ? I know the nationals,but I think that they would be reluctant to join the ingredients of a Pasty.Cheers....Doug

cajef
18th July 2012, 22:15
Thanks for this,but as a Colonial,what is Swede ? I know the nationals,but I think that they would be reluctant to join the ingredients of a Pasty.Cheers....Doug

Here in Cornwall locals call a Swede a Turnip and vice verse just to confuse people.:D

Member of the same family as the Turnip but a bit larger.

Google is your friend:-http://www.fondation-louisbonduelle.org/france/en/know-your-vegetables/nutritional-assets-of-vegetables/rutabaga.html#axzz210i177Ut

spongebob
18th July 2012, 22:19
Thanks for this,but as a Colonial,what is Swede ? I know the nationals,but I think that they would be reluctant to join the ingredients of a Pasty.Cheers....Doug


Doug, a swede is best described as a sweet turnip,usually larger than its relative and less pungent.
It is currently swede time here and its main use is as an additive to a good vegetable soup or as supplementary winter feed for the cows.

Bob

Barrie Youde
18th July 2012, 22:19
Likewise "white shortening"?

Is it the same as lard?

Mad Landsman
18th July 2012, 22:25
Likewise "white shortening"?

Is it the same as lard?

Normally a vegetable based hard fat, such as Cookeen.

Barrie Youde
18th July 2012, 22:28
Many thanks!

Mad Landsman
18th July 2012, 22:33
Thanks for this,but as a Colonial,what is Swede ? I know the nationals,but I think that they would be reluctant to join the ingredients of a Pasty.Cheers....Doug

Swede, Kohlrabi, Turnip - All are brassicas and part of the cabbage family.

Swede - aka Swedish turnip
Kohlrabi - aka German turnip.

John Dryden
18th July 2012, 22:52
Got to look around or ask for a bit of beef skirt nowadays..no chance it,s on view in the shops.Very tasty cut though.

lesbryan
18th July 2012, 23:15
Ginsters are not bad .but the best (to me)were from the oggie shop next to the avondale outside the dockyard

the brit
18th July 2012, 23:43
my granma would make them with skirt, kidneys potatoes, grated carrots and swede, salt and pepper, bloody gorgeous on a saturday afternoon after the football at home park.(plymouth) would smother 'em in ketchup or hp sauce. heaven they were.

GEORDIE LAD
18th July 2012, 23:45
Thanks guys.On Tyneside (60 years ago) a turnip was known as a snajie.I don't know if there ever was spelling for it,but I gave the phonetics.Cheers...Doug

John Paul
19th July 2012, 01:43
50/50 of lard and butter makes a firm case,massage into the flour,not in a mixer add warm water as required,can't beat it.

john fraser
20th July 2012, 06:30
Here in Elgin.North East Scotland. The Proper Pasty Company is advertising various types of Cornish Pasty.When I queried the Haggis Cornish Pasty I was informed the ingredients were sent from Edinburgh to Cornwall and assembled and there. www.properpasty.co.uk

spongebob
20th July 2012, 07:01
Got to look around or ask for a bit of beef skirt nowadays..no chance it,s on view in the shops.Very tasty cut though.

Like the offal, these cheaper cuts seem to have gone out of fashion or more likely, are being sold for conversion to hamburger meat.
Skirt, chuck, gravy, shin, blade etc are the tastiest beef cuts for pies and pasties as providing they are well done.

Bob

alan ward
20th July 2012, 15:07
Cornish pasty?sawdust wrapped in a flannel.Cornwall and all points of the compass never had a good one yet at 63.

sparkie2182
20th July 2012, 15:17
You failed your aptitude test for the Diplomatic Corps, Alan.

:)

frangio
22nd July 2012, 14:11
Likewise "white shortening"?

Is it the same as lard?

I use butter in my pastry and put some on top of the fillling and then sprinkle flour over it before sealing.

Also make a Swiss Chard and Gruyere pasty as a vegy substitute. Really tasty too!

alan ward
22nd July 2012, 15:01
You failed your aptitude test for the Diplomatic Corps, Alan.

:)

I`ve tasted the nasty little bastards,in every`authentic`Cornish outlet,from Padstow to Falmouth,Manaccan,Helston and all points east and west.I`ve had `em made on board by a cornish chief cook from Penzance and it should have gone by the board.Dry,unseasoned,boring tourist trap shite.About as traditional as Rick Stein and he`s from Oxfordshire.

alan ward
22nd July 2012, 15:03
.....and I`ve noticed that most of the positive postings on this thread have been predominantly people who make their own,that`s the way to do it.

frangio
23rd July 2012, 13:14
.....and I`ve noticed that most of the positive postings on this thread have been predominantly people who make their own,that`s the way to do it.

I would say that's true about all food. Both my wife and I are keen cooks and do everything from scratch.

It's got to the point now that we are often disappointed when we eat out, especially when you get the bill and think of the sheer amount of ingredients you could buy for that money to make better food at home.

Plus, when you stay at home and cook you can both have as much wine with the meal as you like!

gdynia
23rd July 2012, 13:25
I had a Cornish Pasty here in Hamburg on Saturday night in a Russian Resturant and hate to say it but its the best ive ever tasted

Barrie Youde
23rd July 2012, 15:00
I'm beginning to realise that my request for a recipe for the construction of a Cornish pasty (venerable though the genuine article no doubt is) was probably as daft as asking, "How do you make a sandwich?"

My apologies.

Demain je vais a la Bretagne (Portsmouth -St Malo) et j'attends avec impatience la gastronomie de la region!

the brit
23rd July 2012, 16:08
I'm beginning to realise that my request for a recipe for the construction of a Cornish pasty (venerable though the genuine article no doubt is) was probably as daft as asking, "How do you make a sandwich?"

My apologies.

Demain je vais a la Bretagne (Portsmouth -St Malo) et j'attends avec impatience la gastronomie de la region!

les escargots sont bonnes à cette époque de l'année, mais prenez garde les cuisses de grenouille et le crabe, bon appetit.

Farmer John
23rd July 2012, 17:23
Swede, Kohlrabi, Turnip - All are brassicas and part of the cabbage family.

Swede - aka Swedish turnip
Kohlrabi - aka German turnip.

One farm I worked on grew kohlrabi as a change from swedes for winter feed for sheep (older ewes). Kohrabi is a much harder root, most of the ewes lost their teeth and had to go onto beet tops and such. Never tamper with a system that works without thinking it through.

kevjacko
23rd July 2012, 20:31
I'm beginning to realise that my request for a recipe for the construction of a Cornish pasty (venerable though the genuine article no doubt is) was probably as daft as asking, "How do you make a sandwich?"

My apologies.

Demain je vais a la Bretagne (Portsmouth -St Malo) et j'attends avec impatience la gastronomie de la region!

And that's probably coz not even the Cornish members can agree to the filling mate. To me it's always been diced beef, swede, and possibly potato. Talk to some and they tell you different. Some say the original pastie had a sweet side with a lump of apple or some other fruit in (apparently). The crust was never supposed to be eaten (again apparently), it had to be big enough to be held in a dirty tin miners hand and thrown away. So much hearsay and contradiction I'm afraid
Si if I was you I'd just invent my own, like I do, coz there's even differentials in the shape of the pasties I've seen. Will get round to posting a recipe sometime soon mate.

Tara

Barrie Youde
23rd July 2012, 21:39
#40

Monsieur le Brit,

Merci bien!

Bien sur, mon Whitmarsh est dans mon valise! Arrete le voiture! Le postillion est frappe par la foudre!!

Langoustines? Crevettes? Et tous les fruits de mer!

Alors!

BY

the brit
23rd July 2012, 22:08
#40

Monsieur le Brit,

Merci bien!

Bien sur, mon Whitmarsh est dans mon valise! Arrete le voiture! Le postillion est frappe par la foudre!!

Langoustines? Crevettes? Et tous les fruits de mer!

Alors!

BY

Bonjour monsieur youde je suis de plymouth à l'origine vivant maintenant à Montréal mon français n'est pas mauvais, mais pourrait bien être mieux, où avez-vous appris votre français, vous ne sont pas dérangés me demandant de vous, j'ai été ici maintenant 24 ans et encore pas tout à fait comprendre le Québec français un peu différent que les français de france.

the french language here in quebec is slightly different than french from france so my wife tells me i know the quebecoise make much fun of there french couterparts.

Robert Hilton
24th July 2012, 07:29
To the last few posts: Quelle érudition, or you're dead araldite.

pete
24th July 2012, 09:10
Really good Pasties can be found at Ivor Dewdney in Plymouth, However nothing can beat Homemade. As I'm from West Devon I'm going to shutup before "Cousin Jack" (The Cornish contingent) send up a raiding party to remove my head.......pete

Binnacle
24th July 2012, 09:56
A bridie for me, a bridie for me.
If ye're no a bridie ye're nae use to me.
Ye're pasties are braw, fae Cornwall and a'.
But the Forfar Bridie is pride of them a'. (Thumb)

Apologies to Robert Wilson's executors.

Lewis
24th July 2012, 10:26
Now you're talking! Nothing beats a Bridie. No lumps of half-cooked swede in there. Best I've tasted is Fleming's in Dundee. Lovely flakey pastry and real beef, not mince. Delicious!

kevjacko
24th July 2012, 19:52
Now you're talking! Nothing beats a Bridie. No lumps of half-cooked swede in there. Best I've tasted is Fleming's in Dundee. Lovely flakey pastry and real beef, not mince. Delicious!

Any pea's in it ? purely for research purposes you understand......

pete
25th July 2012, 08:49
No Way kevjacko, No Way.................pete

alan ward
25th July 2012, 09:27
Re post #44.On our way further south we always stop for an overnighter in Calais after the drive to Dover and the ferry crossing stopping at the small parking area near to the beach and the harbour entrance.The bar/cafe owner there is genuine character,always half pissed smoking away behind the bar with his missus and all the waiters following suit.We`ve tried speaking in french to him but he won`t have it,he said`I don`t mind the English they can`t speak French but they have a go,what really gets to me are the Canadians who think they speak French and don`t but worse of all are the Americans from Lousiana God knows what they speak`

Arthur C
6th August 2012, 05:27
Hi All,
Iam an ex Houlder /FW, 3/E & went touring around UK in a motor home last year, went to St Ives & at a noted local Pastry Shop asked for a Tiddy Oggie, the guy looked at me & said we don't call them that here.... they are called Cornish Pasties. They were delicious, You must use Skirt Steak for the meat & Swede or veg. similar + potatoes, but usually contain no peas or carrots.

As you all know these meals in a pastry case were given to the Tin Miners long ago for their meal while working, long live Traditional recipes.

Arthur C. (Perth, W Oz)

kernewekmarnor
8th August 2012, 20:15
Best pasty? Grandmothers....from Polruan
2nd best pasty? Mothers.....from Fowey

Simple really.

Arthur C
9th August 2012, 03:44
Hi cajef,
Thanks for the pasty recipe, holidayed in Cornwall last year & this recipe you gave is the traditional one, as we got lots of advice from locals all over this lovely county, from the 'Janors' (Cornish Natives) to an Emmett (Outsider).

Arthur C. (Ex 3/e) [this is a great thread, thanks to all you nice people].

kernewekmarnor
9th August 2012, 23:43
Arthur,

Just for your information emmett in the Cornish means ant....guess 'twas all about the english holiday makers all swarming around the place back in the day.

Robert Hilton
10th August 2012, 08:39
Arthur,

Just for your information emmett in the Cornish means ant....guess 'twas all about the english holiday makers all swarming around the place back in the day.

A good word, but it isn't Cornish. It comes from Old English via Middle English. What about 'grockle'?

pete
10th August 2012, 10:32
"Bl**dy Grockles and their Caravans blocking all the Devon Lanes" approx. Quote from the Film "The System" 1962. Thought to have come from the clown Grock who lived in Torquay and referred to tourists as Grockles meaning Little Grocks, referring to there comedic ways and clownish bumbling ways................pete

pete
10th August 2012, 10:39
As a matter of interest Grockles are sometimes referred to as haemorrhoids because they are Pink, come in bunches and they're a pain in the A**SE........pete

trotterdotpom
10th August 2012, 10:44
Last year I had a holiday at Hamilton Island in the Great Barrier Reef. Everyone there, including the workers, was a blow in as there are no "locals" of any longevity. Very refreshing to not have any supercilious residents sneering at you while still wanting your money.

A former "Grockle", John T

len mazza
11th August 2012, 06:34
Hi Folks,
Just had the chance to the very pleasant DUTCH baker at the local supermarket what the basic ingridients are for the pastie,will keep an out to see if there is in any change in the product.
Cheers,
Len.

Ron Stringer
11th August 2012, 08:38
I spent from July to Christmas of 1966 attending a Marine Electronics Diploma course at Plymouth Tech. and greatly enjoyed my time there, often going into Cornwall at weekends to sample the food and drink in the pubs that were recommended each Friday in the local newspaper. MIMCo "had a presence" in Brixham, Falmouth, Looe and Plymouth so later, when I was based in Chelmsford, I often had occasion to visit the area. I found that the people in Devon were generally pretty happy with their lives and lifestyles, whilst on the other side of the Tamar things were rather different.

A common complaint in Cornwall was the injustice that they suffered at the hands of the "bloody English" in general and, in particular those up in London, who took everything but gave them nothing. The holiday home owners and absentee landlords were ruining the county and the retired English were forcing up housing prices. 'Independence from England was what they really needed' seemed to be the theme. This could be construed as 'the English should go back to England - well, just as long as they don't take away the Benefits Office and the dole when they go.' Elsewhere there has always been a healthy disrespect for the performance of the government of the time so the anti-London comments are not surprising. But, outside Cornwall, wherever I travelled within England I never came across another county showing similar resentment to visitors other parts of the country. Certainly not on the Devon side of the river.

Always seemed very odd to me, since without the tourists most Cornish towns would be in a sad way, their railways would have gone completely and there would have been no modern trunk roads, only Cornish lanes, since there would have been nothing to transport. Envy and resentment seem such negative characteristics for a county to adopt.

kernewekmarnor
11th August 2012, 22:53
Spoken like a true englishman.
course things are different on the other side of the Tamar....

matthew flinders
12th August 2012, 20:28
Best pasty? Grandmothers....from Polruan
2nd best pasty? Mothers.....from Fowey

Simple really.

In 1961 presumably before all the pasty shop chains the Chief Steward, from Falmouth, had his wife aboard who made delicious pasties. However, as an apprentice I would eat pretty much anything then.
As an aside I liked Timothy Spall's account of the Cornish calling the English Egg Jellys - probably Rock or Polzeath.

Arthur C
12th August 2012, 20:52
Hi All,
I loved Cornwall, when I visited last year (2011) & enjoyed the laid back easy going way of the Janors, happy, carefree people.
Also I know that the cuisine, The Meal in a Pastry envelope, is not exactly health food, but with a pint of good beer in one hand, a Cornish pasty in the other....
looking out over the lovely view at Carbis Bay (St Ives) on the north coast, or on the south coast looking out on the English Channel from Praa Sands is like being in heaven.

Arthur C. (the Taffy, Aussie)

Ian Harrod
13th August 2012, 03:05
All this correspondence on dumplings, now Cornish pasties. Thank God no-one has mentioned Yorkshire puddings!

ray morgan
13th August 2012, 13:58
I always remember them being called, "sealed orders" on a ship because you never knew what was in them.

Robert Hilton
13th August 2012, 14:35
I may have posted this before, but it's relevant to this thread.

OGGY

When all the World was clean and bright and new,
The mountains, plains and forests all laid out,
Every beast knew exactly what to do,
Browse, graze, predate, instinct removing doubt.

Each woman in her kitchen stood bemused
At earth's abundance, wondering where to start.
The Architect on seeing this devised
For each her basic culinary art.

Rice dishes for the Asiatic hordes,
For Scotsmen porridge, scones and certain kails,
For Scandinavians ample smorgasbords,
And for the French tureens of frogs and snails.

So were created the World's basic dishes,
All in a blink of the Creator's eye,
From vegetables, meats, from loaves and fishes,
'Til all was done. But then there came a cry.

"'Old 'ard me luvver, all the rest may dine
"On these fine dishes, but they just won't do
"For my young fellow, 'ee works down a mine.
"You can't go down a mine with plates of stew.

"He'll need to take it with him in the morning,
"Or else I'll have to drop it down the shaft
"First calling out his name to give a warning.
"He'll catch it in a cloth with cunning craft."

The Architect sat at his desk to think
Of what requirements should be met here,
And dipping a new quill in magic ink
Wrote out the needs to make the problem clear.

A meal for a miner underground,
A fisherman or worker on the land,
A meal substantial, wholesome and all round,
But able to be eaten from the hand

Or carried in a pocket safely wrapped
Inside a woollen sock to keep it warm
And so designed as to be safely dropped
Down a tin mine, and caught there without harm.

And so this splendid meal came to be
Neat, practical and nourishing and tasty,
To eat below, above, on land or sea,
Creation's paragon, The Cornish Pasty.

Copyright: Robert Hilton.

David Williams
13th August 2012, 15:13
Hi,
Bought two of the above recently here in Napier,only resemblence to the real thing was the shape,can you still get a decent on in the UK.

Cheers, Len.

Hi Len.
You can buy a sort of Cornish Pastie all
over the UK,but you have to go to Devon
or Cornwall for the "real" thing,with the meat,
potatoes and Swede,all in layers,scrumptios,
I make a point of having at least one,every time
that I visit the area.Not cheap any more,over the
three pounds apeice.You can also get them in
Chillie,Marsala,etc etc,but in my opinion,not at all
like the real thing.

Dave Williams

alan ward
19th August 2012, 14:59
All this correspondence on dumplings, now Cornish pasties. Thank God no-one has mentioned Yorkshire puddings!

Well since you come to mention them,whatever happened to `proper`yorkshire puddings cooked in smoking hot beef dripping and using a big roasting pan?If it wasn`t for Auntie Bettys tiny little offerings half the world wouldn`t even have seen or tasted one.

Regarding all this separatist movement stuff my Dad Hull born,bred and buttered used to say`They ought to be glad we let `em live;until 848 they paid us to leave `em alone`
`

Caperora
20th August 2012, 04:39
Well since you come to mention them,whatever happened to `proper`yorkshire puddings cooked in smoking hot beef dripping and using a big roasting pan?If it wasn`t for Auntie Bettys tiny little offerings half the world wouldn`t even have seen or tasted one.

Regarding all this separatist movement stuff my Dad Hull born,bred and buttered used to say`They ought to be glad we let `em live;until 848 they paid us to leave `em alone`
`

Cook 'proper' yorkshire pudding most week ends when I am home but use smoking hot goose fat (well do live in Norfolk LOL)

spongebob
20th August 2012, 06:20
All this correspondence on dumplings, now Cornish pasties. Thank God no-one has mentioned Yorkshire puddings!

Then there is the lardy cake

alan ward
20th August 2012, 10:25
#70 That`s the spirit of good cooking development,I`d never thought of goose fat but I`ll try it soon thank you.

Caperora
20th August 2012, 14:18
#70 That`s the spirit of good cooking development,I`d never thought of goose fat but I`ll try it soon thank you.

Not good for you I am sure but makes great yorkie puds and also roast the potatos in it [=P]

kevjacko
20th August 2012, 17:07
Well since you come to mention them,whatever happened to `proper`yorkshire puddings cooked in smoking hot beef dripping and using a big roasting pan?If it wasn`t for Auntie Bettys tiny little offerings half the world wouldn`t even have seen or tasted one.

Regarding all this separatist movement stuff my Dad Hull born,bred and buttered used to say`They ought to be glad we let `em live;until 848 they paid us to leave `em alone`
`

Me old Nanna (was from Hull) used to make them this way, and she used to turn them during cooking, they were without a doubt the best Yorkies I ever tasted, she took the secret to her grave though of how exactly she made them.

William Clark8
23rd December 2014, 03:59
Me old Nanna (was from Hull) used to make them this way, and she used to turn them during cooking, they were without a doubt the best Yorkies I ever tasted, she took the secret to her grave though of how exactly she made them.

We used to call them "Sealed Orders"(==D)

trotterdotpom
23rd December 2014, 11:16
Me old Nanna (was from Hull) used to make them this way, and she used to turn them during cooking, they were without a doubt the best Yorkies I ever tasted, she took the secret to her grave though of how exactly she made them.

Turning a Yorkshire Pudding! Sounds like a baked omelette. My brother-in-law's mother (from Carlton in Cleveland) made Yorkshire puddings that rose so high they had to take the oven door off to get them out - they still talk about it in the pub. That wouldn't have happened if she'd turned them over. Are you sure your Nanna wasn't a Cockney?

John T

kudu
26th December 2014, 10:31
Last year my wife and I were in San Francisco,I noticed in foyer of the hotel a small shop selling cakes.They also had pasties,the first I had ever seen in the USA(all savouries such as meat pies ,sausage rolls etc,are no,no's).I asked the shop assistant for a pastie,but she didn't have a clue what I was talking about.When I pointed to them ,she said "they aren't pasties ,there hand pies"?

cueball44
26th December 2014, 11:03
Last year my wife and I were in San Francisco,I noticed in foyer of the hotel a small shop selling cakes.They also had pasties,the first I had ever seen in the USA(all savouries such as meat pies ,sausage rolls etc,are no,no's).I asked the shop assistant for a pastie,but she didn't have a clue what I was talking about.When I pointed to them ,she said "they aren't pasties ,there hand pies"? Do you mean these. www.marthastewart.com/1058976/savory-hand-pies

trotterdotpom
26th December 2014, 11:42
It's a wonder she didn't clock you with her handbag, Kudu. Over there, I think "pasties" are those things strippers stick on their nipples.

John T

alan ward
26th December 2014, 14:02
Hi, Kevjacko!

Hope you might try selling your pasties at Tebay - best service-station on the motorway network!

B

We visited there on the recomendation of a lorry driving mate of mine and endured one of the worst breakfasts I have ever had the misfortune of seeing.The egg yolk fell out,fell out,of the white it was so small and shrunken and the fried bread shattered into fragments when I attempted to cut it,I asked to see the manager,not available,the chef wouldn`t come out of the kitchen,got half my money back`cause you`ve eaten the bacon and black pudding`utter shite

Hamish Mackintosh
26th December 2014, 17:49
We used to call them "Sealed Orders"(==D)

Thats what my old man called them during the war, as he said you never knew what was in them , but you sure knew where you were going after you ate one

Steve Oatey
26th December 2014, 19:45
There's a brilliant Cornish Pasty shop in Keswick of all places at the bottom of the market place, although I'm not sure what theyre calling them at the mo after all this stupid carry on about Cornish Pasties having to be made in Cornwall 'I swear' have people not got anything else to worry about than what other folk call their pasties?

My view is that the more folk who make a pasty and call it 'Cornish' the more it will pique peoples curiosity to visit Cornwall and sample the real thing (spending their hard earned wonga in the local economy to boot). Now my local bakers just call them 'pasties' dont look, taste, smell any different than they did before some small minded bunch of yokels decided the word Cornish was theirs, and theirs alone, pathetic......

Ah well that's me rant of the day oot the way, I'm off to enjoy the rest of the evening, might even bake mesel a pastie or two and call it what I damned well please.

I think Cumberland sausage has the same "name protection", speaking of Keswick.

trotterdotpom
26th December 2014, 22:06
Yes, "sealed orders" and also known as a "who*re's handbag".

Name protection: also Kendal Mintcake - eaten on Everest ... And Scafell.

John T

Peter Raw
4th January 2015, 15:47
A proper Devonshire pasty ! Actually last nights tea.

morky1
4th December 2018, 13:06
'alf a pound of lard and flour, makes a tiddy oggie,
all the more for you and me, cor bugger Janner …...