Narvik: Part I & II

cshortridge73
8th September 2012, 13:57
GERMANY'S LOSS OF TEN DESTROYERS AND THREE CRUISERS DURING THE NORWEGIAN CAMPAIGN
THIS IS THE BATTLE THAT ALTERED THE OUTCOME OF WW II....SO DECIMATED THE KRIEGSMARINE THAT ADOLPH HITLER WAS COMPELLED TO CALL OFF THE INVASION OF GREAT BRITAIN.

Peering into the darkness as the heavy cruiser Blucher cautiously led the vanguard of German warships proceeding through the narrow straits of Norwayís Drobak Sound,
Kapitan zur See Heinrich Woldag tried without success to identify the darkened fortress at Oscarborg on the tip of Kaholmen Island.

The unseen fort was the invading columnís last obstacle before they would triumphantly steam into Oslo Harbor to quickly deploy the 1,000 German army shock troops hiding inside Blucherís darkened hull. By dawn, the shocked Norwegian citizenry would awake to find the Nazi swastika flying over Norwegian King Haaken IIís palace; their capital fully under German military control with gun bristling Nazi tanks and scout cars patrolling the cityís streets.

The link to Part I & II: HERE (http://navalmerchantshiparticles.blogspot.com/2012/02/narvikpart-one-and-two.html)

chadburn
8th September 2012, 15:59
Like myself I would think there would be a fair number on this Site who have been to Narvik on the Ore run's Bud, in my case it was in 1968 early !969 when we were on a regular return run from The Botlek (Rotterdam) to Narvik where there was and still is probably a superb Museum dedicated to the two Battle's for Narvik with a fair amount of ship's equipment both German and British on display . The Museum was in aid of the Red Cross and given the time ashore I alway's paid a visit to the museum. My Father wrote about his experience's in Norway with the 1st Batt Green Howard's fighting the rearguard action that allowed other Servicemen, the Royal Family and those civilian's who wanted to leave time to get out. Although his action was nearer to Oslo I gave the museum a copy.

cshortridge73
8th September 2012, 16:18
Thanks for sharing that info....much, much appreciated. I'll put that info in my notes

donald h
8th September 2012, 18:28
Thoroughly enjoyed the history in this one, Bud.

My father was up there in the latter stages onboard a Fleet Escort Oiler named the British Lady.
From research in later years, "The British Lady was escorted northwards by two armed trawlers to Skjelfjord as a replacement for a Royal Fleet Auxiliary tanker which had been sunk on her way north. She arrived in "Cripple Creek" in a snow blizzard on the 13th of April, where the Tribal Class Destroyers came alongside and guzzled up her precious fuel.
The Eskimo replenished during the night and was then relieved by Bedouin and the Punjabi, who then proceeded to do the same." etc

He remembered being told by some of the Punjabi`s seamen that a shell had hit the NAAFI canteen onboard the warship releasing many bars of 'free' chocolate, much to their delight (under those particular circumstances, of course).
His most unpleasant memory of the whole maritime war (including being torpedoed twice (and sunk) himself in the space of six weeks in 1942), was of our own damaged ships returning from the battles in the Fjords with their corpses laid out on their decks.

Thanks for a most interesting read.
regards, Donald