Container ships

cadetconway
23rd December 2012, 17:48
Am I the only person that does,nt know what Te,s (,or is it Tu,s)
concerning the number of containers a container ship can cary?
What does the initial stand for? cadetconway

A.D.FROST
23rd December 2012, 18:08
Am I the only person that does,nt know what Te,s (,or is it Tu,s)
concerning the number of containers a container ship can cary?
What does the initial stand for? cadetconway

Twenty-Foot,Equivalent,Unit (TEU) just google it1!(Pint)

jimthehat
23rd December 2012, 23:00
[QUOTE=A.D.FROST;643376]Twenty-Foot,Equivalent,Unit (TEU) just google it1!(Pint)[/QUOT

Also FEU(forty foot equiv)

A.D.FROST
24th December 2012, 08:53
A part from a (Pint) its one of the few measurements that hasn't gone metric (even in France) SEU= Sixty-metre, Equivalent,Unit(Scribe)

R58484956
24th December 2012, 12:40
Greetings cadetconway and a warm welcome to SN. Ask a question and up comes a prompt answer. Bon voyage and a merry xmas.

Pilot mac
24th December 2012, 12:42
I wonder who came up with the concept of the 'teu'. One of the pioneers of containerisation (arguably the pioneer) was The Sealand Corporation of New Jersey. Some years ago Sealand were a massive organisation and their standard container was 35 ft. All Sealand ships were equiped to carry 35's but the cells were also able to accomodate 40's and 20's. Sealand ships could carry any other containers but standard built ships were unable to accomodate the 35's. Possibly a clever marketing strategy?

regards
Dave

John Cassels
24th December 2012, 15:02
Are you sure Dave ?.

Not sure how one would get a 35' container in a 20' cell guide .

Pilot mac
24th December 2012, 16:24
Quite right John but never had any dedicated 20ft cells, each cell would either accomodate one 40 or one 35 or two 20's. In the 80's a lot of the 35's were jumboised to 40's.

Dave

oldseamerchant
24th December 2012, 17:49
John/Dave,

Try and obtain 'The Box' a comprehensive book on the Container right from its conception (well before McLean). All about the 'Ideal X' McLeans first and the struggle to achieve conformity in size. Hawaii SS favoured the 35'

Pilot mac
24th December 2012, 20:18
The old British Rail' Liftvan' must have been one of the earliest.

Dave

RobW
2nd January 2013, 12:54
The term TEU is understood to have been "invented" by Richard Gibney who was editor of the UK-based publication Containerisation International Yearbook during the 60s and 70s. It was devised as a means of comparing relative capacity of containerships and ro-ro vessels which at the time carried various sizes of "odd" boxes such as 24 foot and 35 foot. The term FEU came about much later though the origins of this term is not known.

5036
2nd January 2013, 14:16
It would be a brave man that tried to metricate the teu system considering how many ships and containers would have to be altered.

Other unassailable imperial standards are miles per hour on UK and US roads, standard rail gauge of 4ft 8 1/2 ins used in 60% of the world's railways and of course the knot for marine and aeronautical issues.

Mix up of kgs and lbs have cause grief in Mars space craft and in aircraft who ordered fuel in kgs and were fuelled in lbs.

A.D.FROST
2nd January 2013, 15:01
It would be a brave man that tried to metricate the teu system considering how many ships and containers would have to be altered.

Other unassailable imperial standards are miles per hour on UK and US roads, standard rail gauge of 4ft 8 1/2 ins used in 60% of the world's railways and of course the knot for marine and aeronautical issues.

Mix up of kgs and lbs have cause grief in Mars space craft and in aircraft who ordered fuel in kgs and were fuelled in lbs.

If it's ain't broken why fix it.(Wave)

calmac
21st January 2013, 10:26
Going to be interesting trying to fit an OZ 48 foot box somewhere

A.D.FROST
23rd January 2013, 14:56
Going to be interesting trying to fit an OZ 48 foot box somewhere

I don't think it'll catch on,but thats what they said about containers(Ouch)

spongebob
4th October 2016, 20:33
The port of Tauranga is hosting NZ's largest ever ship today with the berthing of the Aotea Maersk container ship. The 9640 TEU, 347 metre long vessel arrived from Chile on its new route service connecting to NZ and onward to North Asian ports.
The Tauranga harbour board has recently completed a 350 million dollar investment in dredging and infrastructure to uprate the port for these larger vessels.

Bob