Log Carriers

spongebob
28th April 2013, 06:26
Apart from our unique NZ climate being the optimum for the dairy trade we are experiencing similar bountiful production from our exotic pine forests first planted in the early 1900’s which are now yielding their third crop off an area of over 190000 hectares in the initial Kaiangaroa forest.
There has been a huge increase in demand from China for their timber house construction boom and this demand is amplified by the fact that Russia has recently applied a 25% export tax to their forest harvests.
Where we live in Tauranga, the main roads are filled with truck and trailer units carrying logs to the port where huge log piles exist to feed the constant stream of Asian shipping calling for cargoes.

Pacific Basin Shipping now owns 56 vessels equipped for log carrying duties while Cosco Shipping is reported to be switching 13 ships from the African/China hardwood log trade to the NZ run.
STX Pan Pacific is also operating ships on the NZ log run. Overall, the global demand for logs moved by ships is expected to expand by about 7% annually up to at least 2017.
Judging by the photographs accompanying the local press article, the modification to the ships appears to be the fitting of high steel RSJ type stanchions along the ship’s side at deck level and reaching up to just below the bridge. At a guess, these are spaced at 2.4 to 3.0 metre intervals and with top cross-ties would provide a ‘deck cage’ to keep the cargo secure.
In spite of this demand, the trees are still growing faster than they are being harvested and a shipping boom in this area is assured.


Bob

ben27
29th April 2013, 00:59
good day spongebob.yesterday.15:26.re:log carriers.a most interesting thread.i note at the end of your article,it states the trees are growing faster than they are being harvested.that is amazing.my wife and I have been in the area where the tree forrest are.an amazing site.trees as far as the eye can see.and all man planted.(mainly in the depression of the 30ts.)stay well.ben27

Hamish Mackintosh
29th April 2013, 01:15
Its a strange world we live in.Here in BC we have more timber than you can shake a stick at(excuse the pun) however shipping RAW logs is a big bone of contention, as it is seen by many as exporting JOBS. ie Finished lumber,wood products(furniture etc)

Samsette
29th April 2013, 03:04
Its a strange world we live in.Here in BC we have more timber than you can shake a stick at(excuse the pun) however shipping RAW logs is a big bone of contention, as it is seen by many as exporting JOBS. ie Finished lumber,wood products(furniture etc)

Yes, and cries for the cessation of log exports and regaining the value added processing of our forest harvest usually meets with the complaint that a ban on exports of raw logs will result in a huge loss of jobs to the fallers. But what about the jobs we could regain with milling it for export? We used to have the largest sawmill in the Commonwealth; one of many, plus plywood mills, and cedar shake mills - and even a chopstick producer(Wave) in Alberta.
We are at the mercy of greedy multinational one worlder corporations. But, thats OK, I'm alright Jack.

spongebob
29th April 2013, 21:35
Good morning Samsette, yes we have the same argument in NZ.
Why export raw logs when we have the facilities and labour on the spot to process the timber to its ultimate size and form thus cutting the shipping cost in perhaps half? It is the labour cost differential in a nutshell.
Yesterday I went to Bunnings, our local Australasian building and hardware super market, to buy a new broom handle. The locally made one was priced at $12 while a short distance away were China made plastic leaf rakes with wooden handles priced at $4. Identical in size finish and quality the choice was simple so I now have a spare rake head and a newly shafted broom.

Bob