ED Captains and their traits.

Graham the pipe
21st September 2013, 08:36
Each would have their traits, particularly in times of stress. 'No name no pack drill' but one used to chew handkerchiefs on the bridge whilst docking or undocking. Would be interested to hear other Es of Es stories on this subject.

trotterdotpom
21st September 2013, 11:15
I'll throw a name into the ring .... Ginger Aitken, reputed to wear an elephant's foreskin in his bicep (strong JuJu). Some great yarns about him, including getting everyone banned from the oyibos club in Sapele. He may have been a Paddy Henderson's man. All hearsay to me, of course .... I was on a charter ship, but he's my hero.

John T

Graham the pipe
21st September 2013, 11:56
I'll throw a name into the ring .... Ginger Aitken, reputed to wear an elephant's foreskin in his bicep (strong JuJu). Some great yarns about him, including getting everyone banned from the oyibos club in Sapele. He may have been a Paddy Henderson's man. All hearsay to me, of course .... I was on a charter ship, but he's my hero.

John T

Hi John,

Name not familiar but if he was in to JuJu sounds as if, like the rest of us, he'd spend too long up the proverbial/Nigerian creek. Would love to know the full story of the Sapele club embargo.

trotterdotpom
21st September 2013, 22:33
Stories related to me by an ex PH engineer. Apparently a few tables were knocked over in the club and ship personel were subsequently banned. Maybe the ju ju didn't work in electric light.

John T

richardwakeley
22nd September 2013, 06:58
I hope nobody starts a similar thread on the strange traits of EDs, and Blue Funnel, sparkes!

makko
22nd September 2013, 09:04
Or engineers, Dick!
Rgds.
Dave

richardwakeley
22nd September 2013, 09:15
Hi Dave,
You forgot the 'Kampong'. I think you met a very peculiar Blue Flue sparks on your first trip.
Rgds
Richard (ex-KD)

richardwakeley
22nd September 2013, 09:31
It was just meant as a self-depreciating joke really. I was in the Ocean Fleets era, so all ED and BF R/Os direct employ. Latterly we had African (sierraleone) crew in Blue Funnel also, they always called me 'Marconi' or 'Spark'.
Anyway, now I will shut up and hand back this thread to it's rightful owner - ED Captains.

trotterdotpom
22nd September 2013, 10:17
It was just meant as a self-depreciating joke really. I was in the Ocean Fleets era, so all ED and BF R/Os direct employ. Latterly we had African (sierraleone) crew in Blue Funnel also, they always called me 'Marconi' or 'Spark'.
Anyway, now I will shut up and hand back this thread to it's rightful owner - ED Captains.

Forget it Richard, he'll never get it.

John T (Sparks and Marconi Sahib ... what the hell?)

Graham the pipe
22nd September 2013, 10:49
Interesting to hear the Sparky, Leccy and Ginger beer comments. Doesn't ANYONE - apart from John T - have any comments on the actual subject matter?

Graham the pipe
22nd September 2013, 11:11
Seems I've, be it totally inadvertently, opened up, or rejuvenated, an on going discussion in respect of?

Naturally, though unknown to me, those referred to who have crossed the bar should be left to RIP. However, to those who've - and I quote Senior Member R651400 - "never, ever got it", may 'they', in the very near future, GET IT, ENJOY IT and join the rest of us who have had IT probably more times than we care to remember!

Graham the pipe
22nd September 2013, 11:33
Amen to that.

Ah! Women to/for 'this' (one)!

mariniero
22nd September 2013, 12:07
Judging by your frequent sychophantic/obsequious response to other posters you've never ever got it.
Most of the guys we are referring to have crossed the bar and a bit of respect necessary.
N'est pas?

Well that sounds rich coming from you! A previous post of mine made reference to this ‘respect’ you mention and clearly something in short supply from yourself. Having spent considerable time reading through your previous posts there are few boundaries where you show respect to fellow members. It is fair to say that you engage in character assassination more than any other member of this site.
If you focussed on the thread rather than trying to score points then maybe your contributions would be worthwhile.

mariniero
22nd September 2013, 12:15
Graham,
I suspect that ED Captains were no different than others in British ships, especially those who we experienced in the aftermath of WWII. They went through a lot and I sailed with several. Were the Liner variety Masters different in traits to the 'lesser' counterparts? I couldn't really say. A suggestion. Should the thread be more generically titled as there may be close relatives reading who might be offended at specific company reference.

makko
22nd September 2013, 16:20
Hi Dave,
You forgot the 'Kampong'. I think you met a very peculiar Blue Flue sparks on your first trip.
Rgds
Richard (ex-KD)

My lips are sealed, Richard!

clibb
22nd September 2013, 16:33
To get back to the original subject. I remember Ginger Aitken well, having done a couple of trips with him when he was Master on the Kohima. He was a Paddy's man, and one little thing I remember was that he would never shut the door on his loo. As that was at the top of the stairs leading to his accommodation it was impossible to avoid him should he be in residence, as it were. On one occasion he saw me coming up the stairs with some papers to sign as I saw him. He beckoned me towards him, and did his business whilst doing his business, you might say. Naturally I didn't ask him why he didn't shut the door but he told me nevertheless that he had been torpedoed during the war whilst in the loo, and the door had jammed. He'd never shut it after that.

Graham the pipe
22nd September 2013, 16:49
Must admit in starting what I thought was 'just a thread', the end result has turned out to be an opportunity for people who know each other - presumably having sailed together, or become acquainted through this site - to exchange 'words' using the space made available, here on this site, to settle 'differences' which should have been settled at the time, in other words years ago. I see this is my 'century' post. What I'll do, now, is 'sign off' and - maybe - get 'involved', again, when the discussion and comments relate to the thread title.

Graham the pipe
22nd September 2013, 16:56
To get back to the original subject. I remember Ginger Aitken well, having done a couple of trips with him when he was Master on the Kohima. He was a Paddy's man, and one little thing I remember was that he would never shut the door on his loo. As that was at the top of the stairs leading to his accommodation it was impossible to avoid him should he be in residence, as it were. On one occasion he saw me coming up the stairs with some papers to sign as I saw him. He beckoned me towards him, and did his business whilst doing his business, you might say. Naturally I didn't ask him why he didn't shut the door but he told me nevertheless that he had been torpedoed during the war whilst in the loo, and the door had jammed. He'd never shut it after that.

Thank you, Clibb, for proving my point and returning this thread to the reason for its 'creation'.

makko
23rd September 2013, 23:00
Naturally I didn't ask him why he didn't shut the door but he told me nevertheless that he had been torpedoed during the war whilst in the loo, and the door had jammed. He'd never shut it after that.

I was told never to close the toilet door when at sea also and never did!

Rgds.
Dave

alan ward
24th September 2013, 10:48
My Old Man,an apprentice and third mate during the war,old me that they never closed their cabin doors at sea as there was a danger of the door frames warping in the event of being torpedoed.

norman.r
24th September 2013, 15:56
There was one master, and admittedly this did not happen every day who during the afternoon siesta when disturbed to come to an anchorage would wrap himself up in the bed sheet and come to the bridge dressed in a toga. The only clue I will give is that it was a post war "S" boat.
Norman

WilliamH
24th September 2013, 16:38
Sorry to stray from your thread Graham but I have a torpedo story. While I was an apprentice I was standing with a fitter watching another fitter prepare a heat exchanger for test, he was doing it very very slowly. "See him" said the fitter beside me, " we were junior engineers on the same ship during the war. We were torpedoed off the coast of Ireland, I rushed into his cabin to make sure he was OK, he was sound asleep in his bunk, I shook him and said come on get up we have been torpedoed to which he replied f --- off its not my watch".

Graham the pipe
24th September 2013, 19:00
There was one master, and admittedly this did not happen every day who during the afternoon siesta when disturbed to come to an anchorage would wrap himself up in the bed sheet and come to the bridge dressed in a toga. The only clue I will give is that it was a post war "S" boat.
Norman

Hi Norm. Again 'no name no pack drill' but did, perchance, his name begin with an 'N' and have four letters? Take this opportunity to wish you a happy '26th'!

eldersuk
25th September 2013, 00:11
There was one master, and admittedly this did not happen every day who during the afternoon siesta when disturbed to come to an anchorage would wrap himself up in the bed sheet and come to the bridge dressed in a toga. The only clue I will give is that it was a post war "S" boat.
Norman


That would be Horace Welton, n'est ce pas?

Derek

chadburn
25th September 2013, 11:19
Still wondering who the Master was of the Polish? built "Sokoto" who found that he had shipped a Ton of Cannabis back from West Africa in the "empty" bulk Stout Tanks when the Customs rummaged his ship. If I remember correctly he was Scottish.