Burials at sea

Mike Fitzpatrick. (Fitzy)
25th January 2014, 10:29
This week I had to question my memory, when the subject arose that it was illegal to bury at sea, up to late 1960 early 70's. I was aboard SS Chusan in the late 1960,s I remember four, occasions when we had burials at sea, three passengers and my fellow steward 'Michael' he was a Goanese waiter, I think he aged about 24, I remember he was buried at sea, as were the passengers, (Not all the same cruise). Could anyone please confirm I was not dreaming, there could be a 'WET' resting on the answer.

kypros
25th January 2014, 10:38
Was present at two burials at sea one on a Booth boat another on a LH both in the sixties.KYPROS

alan ward
25th January 2014, 11:46
I was present at one on ED`s Accra,a deck passenger in 1966

GWB
25th January 2014, 11:58
I was present at several burials at in the 60's on the Southern. Cross Eingines stopped then as body cast to the deep dead slow ahead on Starboard Dead Slow a Stern Port engines.Then back to full ahead, as we had no were to stow dead bodies and the Doctor had pronounced person dead every thing was done correctly. Ships Officers not on stand-by usually attended.

Keith Adkins
25th January 2014, 12:41
As GWB states on the Southern Cross, I was 18 months on her in the late 50's and attended several burials at sea. The saying was that passengers were encouraged by their local GP to take a sea voyage "it would do them a power of good" Alas in some cases it wasn't so

Andy Lavies
25th January 2014, 13:29
Buried the Mate at sea in 1956 from the "Ettrickbank" (no doctor on board but definitely dead!) and an Indian crewman from the "Inchanga" in the late 50's.
Andy

Michael Taylor
26th January 2014, 12:44
I remember well the death of one of the Indian firemen when I was with Ellermans and his "burial" at sea south of Ceylon.....we were told that we should not use a weight so he was placed on a hatchboard, lowered over the side and floated away. Seemed like a good way to go. The Serang had said this was the alternative to a fire funeral he would have had done if ashore in India/

duncs
26th January 2014, 12:56
I remember well the death of one of the Indian firemen when I was with Ellermans and his "burial" at sea south of Ceylon.....we were told that we should not use a weight so he was placed on a hatchboard, lowered over the side and floated away. Seemed like a good way to go. The Serang had said this was the alternative to a fire funeral he would have had done if ashore in India/

This sounds the same as with Muslims (Sirdhana, BI), lowered down and floated off.

D

R58484956
26th January 2014, 15:21
On the QE(1) many burials at sea, telegraphs rang to "stop" for 5 miutes then full ahead, but no actions taken to stop ship, dropped over side at 28 knots.

gwzm
26th January 2014, 16:18
An ex-Brocklebank master, whose name I've long forgotten was buried at sea during my first trip in 1963 on board SS Mahseer. Everyone who wasn't on watch or asleep attended on the aft deck whilst the ceremony was performed.
gwzm

trotterdotpom
27th January 2014, 12:26
On the QE(1) many burials at sea, telegraphs rang to "stop" for 5 miutes then full ahead, but no actions taken to stop ship, dropped over side at 28 knots.

Call me old fashioned, but I think that's poor form.

John T

Farmer John
27th January 2014, 17:51
Call me old fashioned, but I think that's poor form.

John T

I do know what you mean, but I don't suppose The Bod would care.

stan mayes
27th January 2014, 19:28
I made a voyage in Adula of Anglo Saxon Pet.Co..15th June to 18th August 1941.
Loaded 12,000 tons aviation spirit at Point Fortin Trinidad.
UK bound in convoy HX 142 and one of the convoy escorts was the Armed Merchant Cruiser Ausonia ex Cunard liner.
On 10th August a DEMS gunner on my ship accidentally shot himself with a machine gun ...a message to Ausonia brought a RN surgeon to our ship in a boat and the lad was taken to Ausonia.
Sadly the gunner died and a burial service was held on Ausonia next morning.
Another ship in the convoy was Northumberland of Federal Line and now a troopship and she had on board some units of the Canadian Army including a Drum and Pipe band.
Ausonia - Northumberland and Adula reduced speed for the burial service and the Last Post was played by the band ...With the service quickly over it was then full speed ahead to rejoin the convoy..
I doubt if another burial at sea as that one took place during the war.
In recent research I found that the unfortunate DEMS gunner was Royal Navy
AB George S.Cooper aged 22.
We arrived in the Mersey and berthed at Stanlow on 18th August 1941.
Stan

John Rogers
30th January 2014, 16:39
In August of 1951 while on the Bristol City we had a burial at sea off of the coast of the USA,one of our OS was shot in Hoboken,he was Cremated, we stopped the ship,lowered the flag to half staff gave up his ashes to the deep.