Naess Shipping

Stephen J. Card
25th May 2014, 17:01
SHIPPING - Today and Yesterday.
Issue No, 292
JUNE, 2014

Excellent 6 page feature in SHIPPING by Norman Middlemiss.

Good backdown of Erling Naess and his activities as a young man and then in banking and shipping and owner. Of course includes the activites of Naess with management of some of the fleet within J&J Denholm.

Several good quality photographs from FotoFlite especially images of NAESS PIONEER, NAESS CHAMPION, NAESS TRADER, NAESS ENDEAVOUR, NAESS TEXAS and NAESS PARKGATE.


A few questions. The text says that NAESS SOVERIGN wasthe third largest vessel in the world and biggest under British flag... but was under Flag of Convenience and registered in Hamilton, Bermuda.

I always thought that both SOVEREIGN and COMPANION were registered London and that CHAMPION was the largest vessel in the world. (Even in the text CHAMPION was 90,626 dwt b. 1962 and SOVEREIGN was 90,309 and b. 1961.)


Stephen

A.D.FROST
25th May 2014, 19:36
When built in 1961 NAESS SOVEREIGN was the largest ship under the British flag(the Bermuda flag was regarded as British)the largest ship in the World at the time was UNIVERSE APOLLO

John Cassels
25th May 2014, 20:03
Was apprentice on the Naess Cavalier 1964-1965 for a 15 month stint.
Erling D. and son ( or grandson) did a trip from Norfolk down to Panama and the son was given over to us for the 5 days. Taught him the pumproom , soundings and stripping tanks etc .as we still had some ballast in her.
Not sure who that was anymore but he must be ages with me ( 67).!

Stephen J. Card
25th May 2014, 21:41
Was apprentice on the Naess Cavalier 1964-1965 for a 15 month stint.
Erling D. and son ( or grandson) did a trip from Norfolk down to Panama and the son was given over to us for the 5 days. Taught him the pumproom , soundings and stripping tanks etc .as we still had some ballast in her.
Not sure who that was anymore but he must be ages with me ( 67).!


Grew up seeing the NAESS flag every time I went past South Shore road. His office at Nautilus House... still there... had two great builders models at the entrance... ASTRID NAESS and a fantastic one of NAESS PIONEER.

He had a young son... well back then... name Freddie. My sister went out with him once. Damn... I could have joined the family!

I still have a copy of his book... ERLING NAESS - Autography of a Shipping Man. Inscribed : Steve with best regards and best wishes, Erling.

On the PIONEER, R.R. Kinder once called me... "Nephew of Uncle Elliott Naess"!

Good ship. Good memories... special people.

Stephen

Stephen J. Card
25th May 2014, 21:43
When built in 1961 NAESS SOVEREIGN was the largest ship under the British flag(the Bermuda flag was regarded as British)the largest ship in the World at the time was UNIVERSE APOLLO

Thanks. Never knew Hamilton port of registry. I wonder if she switched to London?

Stephen

George Bis
7th August 2014, 18:08
I was on the "Sovereign" in 1969 and she was then under the British flag and registered in London.
I heard that later she became the "Burma Zircon" under the Liberian flag.
Good crowd on her( Indian Crew) and I enjoyed myself on her.

Angus Murray
18th April 2015, 19:38
Seems that the Naess name is still alive and well. Two new vessels with owner having some loose contact with the original Naess family. Naess Absolute and Naess Resolute , bulk carriers built 2013/14 under the Marshall Islands flag.


SHIPPING - Today and Yesterday.
Issue No, 292
JUNE, 2014

Excellent 6 page feature in SHIPPING by Norman Middlemiss.

Good backdown of Erling Naess and his activities as a young man and then in banking and shipping and owner. Of course includes the activites of Naess with management of some of the fleet within J&J Denholm.

Several good quality photographs from FotoFlite especially images of NAESS PIONEER, NAESS CHAMPION, NAESS TRADER, NAESS ENDEAVOUR, NAESS TEXAS and NAESS PARKGATE.


A few questions. The text says that NAESS SOVERIGN wasthe third largest vessel in the world and biggest under British flag... but was under Flag of Convenience and registered in Hamilton, Bermuda.

I always thought that both SOVEREIGN and COMPANION were registered London and that CHAMPION was the largest vessel in the world. (Even in the text CHAMPION was 90,626 dwt b. 1962 and SOVEREIGN was 90,309 and b. 1961.)


Stephen

Keltic Star
19th April 2015, 06:55
SHIPPING - Today and Yesterday.
Issue No, 292
JUNE, 2014

Excellent 6 page feature in SHIPPING by Norman Middlemiss.

Good backdown of Erling Naess and his activities as a young man and then in banking and shipping and owner. Of course includes the activites of Naess with management of some of the fleet within J&J Denholm.

Several good quality photographs from FotoFlite especially images of NAESS PIONEER, NAESS CHAMPION, NAESS TRADER, NAESS ENDEAVOUR, NAESS TEXAS and NAESS PARKGATE.


A few questions. The text says that NAESS SOVERIGN wasthe third largest vessel in the world and biggest under British flag... but was under Flag of Convenience and registered in Hamilton, Bermuda.

I always thought that both SOVEREIGN and COMPANION were registered London and that CHAMPION was the largest vessel in the world. (Even in the text CHAMPION was 90,626 dwt b. 1962 and SOVEREIGN was 90,309 and b. 1961.)


Stephen

Erling Naess had a nephew, Arne, who was on a Board of Directors with myself back in the eighties. He had his own fleet of bulkers and investments in oil rigs. In shipping circles there was a light-hearted warning to count your fingers after shaking Arne's hand and from what I saw at times, I tend to agree with them.

For a while he was married to Diana Ross, was an avid mountaineer and fell to his death on Mount Everest in 2004.

George Bis
20th April 2015, 17:49
SHIPPING - Today and Yesterday.
Issue No, 292
JUNE, 2014

Excellent 6 page feature in SHIPPING by Norman Middlemiss.

Good backdown of Erling Naess and his activities as a young man and then in banking and shipping and owner. Of course includes the activites of Naess with management of some of the fleet within J&J Denholm.

Several good quality photographs from FotoFlite especially images of NAESS PIONEER, NAESS CHAMPION, NAESS TRADER, NAESS ENDEAVOUR, NAESS TEXAS and NAESS PARKGATE.


A few questions. The text says that NAESS SOVERIGN wasthe third largest vessel in the world and biggest under British flag... but was under Flag of Convenience and registered in Hamilton, Bermuda.

I always thought that both SOVEREIGN and COMPANION were registered London and that CHAMPION was the largest vessel in the world. (Even in the text CHAMPION was 90,626 dwt b. 1962 and SOVEREIGN was 90,309 and b. 1961.)


Stephen

The Sovereign was built in 1962 and was under the British flag until 1974 when she became the Burmah Zircon of Liberia. She was scrapped in 1977. I met the Champion in dry dock in Japan in 1968 while I was on the Gallic Bridge and the following year was seven months on the Sovereign

airds
20th April 2015, 18:53
Seems that the Naess name is still alive and well. Two new vessels with owner having some loose contact with the original Naess family. Naess Absolute and Naess Resolute , bulk carriers built 2013/14 under the Marshall Islands flag.

Presently off the Australian West & East coasts respectively

http://goo.gl/psgP1d

http://goo.gl/dzehMg

robin
20th April 2015, 21:08
Hi,
We had a close encounter with the Naess Tern when we arrived back in the river Mersey on the 12-13 March 1964, My ship was the P.S.N.Co., Santander, I was her Chippy, and we had anchored in the river with a smouldering fish-meal fire in No. 3 hold. Just as the tugs were about to move us into the docks, I was heaving up our anchor when an AB ran past me in the dark and shouted that the Naess Tern was about to collide with us. she struck us right in the starboard bow under our name. In that moment our anchor was clear of the bottom so I rushed into the forecastle to sound our forepeak for leaks, as I looked at all the wreckage I could see out through the hole in the bow, and saw the lights of her after accommodation closing fast as she swung clear. I thought she was going to hit us again but she cleared and headed on her way. A good way to end a South American voyage !
Regards,
Robin.

r b quiery
20th April 2015, 22:32
I was on the champion in 1964 & she was registered in london I was on her when she ran aground of Jebal Dhanna we crossed the pacific to ferndale & san pedro sent divers down to assess the damage then recrossed the pacific to Kure to replace the bottom of the forepeak cofferdam & 1 2 & 3 cargo tanks

George Bis
21st April 2015, 09:00
SHIPPING - Today and Yesterday.
Issue No, 292
JUNE, 2014

Excellent 6 page feature in SHIPPING by Norman Middlemiss.

Good backdown of Erling Naess and his activities as a young man and then in banking and shipping and owner. Of course includes the activites of Naess with management of some of the fleet within J&J Denholm.

Several good quality photographs from FotoFlite especially images of NAESS PIONEER, NAESS CHAMPION, NAESS TRADER, NAESS ENDEAVOUR, NAESS TEXAS and NAESS PARKGATE.


A few questions. The text says that NAESS SOVERIGN wasthe third largest vessel in the world and biggest under British flag... but was under Flag of Convenience and registered in Hamilton, Bermuda.

I always thought that both SOVEREIGN and COMPANION were registered London and that CHAMPION was the largest vessel in the world. (Even in the text CHAMPION was 90,626 dwt b. 1962 and SOVEREIGN was 90,309 and b. 1961.)


Stephen
Mr. Naess's life is most interesting. When I started with Denholm's I was told that he had been chartering out ships years before they were built, then using these charters as security for loans to build them.! Quite a trick if you can swing it!

Keltic Star
22nd April 2015, 07:13
Mr. Naess's life is most interesting. When I started with Denholm's I was told that he had been chartering out ships years before they were built, then using these charters as security for loans to build them.! Quite a trick if you can swing it!

It was known as creative Norwegian ship financing and if well contrived could result in up to 110% financing on a ship with little or nothing down. In the good old days of high interest rates there were some wonderful permutations using a combination of clipped US Treasuries, Danish Ship Mortgage bonds and arbitrage.

George Bis
22nd April 2015, 08:54
It was known as creative Norwegian ship financing and if well contrived could result in up to 110% financing on a ship with little or nothing down. In the good old days of high interest rates there were some wonderful permutations using a combination of clipped US Treasuries, Danish Ship Mortgage bonds and arbitrage.

Sort of shipping "buy to rent"!

Keltic Star
23rd April 2015, 06:46
Sort of shipping "buy to rent"!

Even better at times, between 1982 and 1986, the Italian government was giving 86% subsidies on the contract price of an Italian built ship provided you had her registered in Italy with a full Italian crew for 5 years.

George Bis
23rd April 2015, 14:41
Even better at times, between 1982 and 1986, the Italian government was giving 86% subsidies on the contract price of an Italian built ship provided you had her registered in Italy with a full Italian crew for 5 years.

I believe that the "Globtic London" and the "Globtic Tokyo" had similar financial assistance from the U.K. government in the 70's. Not sure if it was a much as that though!

Varley
23rd April 2015, 18:20
There was some per bottom in service aid package that rolled on. Providing the first ship was replaced the loan did not have to be repaid. I think something like this applied to some of the Atlantic Bulker pool. Any experts to knock this into its proper shape?

falconer
17th September 2015, 04:46
Greetings

I was an apprentice on Naess Scotsman in 1966, fine ship!

I attach an image of myself and some officers ashore drinking, what looks like Cuba libre's. Cannot recall names of the officers, one of whom I think is Radio Officer, but perhaps some can recognise

Old Janner
17th September 2015, 12:03
The guy in the centre with the white shirt looks to have had quite a few look at his eyes!

Varley
17th September 2015, 12:48
And therefore your choice for the Radio Officer????

Angus Murray
17th September 2015, 16:09
Ian
Second left (on your right) is Stuart Mackay (Millport), later Master on OIL (Ocean Inchcape) AHTS vessels.



Greetings

I was an apprentice on Naess Scotsman in 1966, fine ship!

I attach an image of myself and some officers ashore drinking, what looks like Cuba libre's. Cannot recall names of the officers, one of whom I think is Radio Officer, but perhaps some can recognise

donald murray
17th September 2015, 17:20
Ian
Second left (on your right) is Stuart Mackay (Millport), later Master on OIL (Ocean Inchcape) AHTS vessels.

Could the officer on the extreme left be 2nd Mate Peter Shaw. He was with me on the Naess Pioneer the following year 1967
Donald Murray

George Porteous
17th September 2015, 18:28
Naess Sovereign was definitely registered in London, when built she was the largest ship ever to be built in Japan, then the Champion took that title. I sailed on her for a year and three days from early 1967, masters Rhodes and Maine? C/O Feltham & Gunn, 2nd mates Donald Urquart & other names I remember were Tony Airey, Hazlett McMahon. On joining the Mobil Endurance in 1974 and sailing past Port Arthur in Texas I was surprised to see the Naess Trader (I sailed first trip 3/0 in 1966 on her)being conferted into a oil drill ship! Also sailed on Naess Spirit(lovely ship with major engine problems), Naess Endeavour and finally the Neass Viking, my last trip with Denholms.
George Porteous

Ian Brown
17th September 2015, 18:28
Yes, that looks like Peter Shaw. He was 2/O on the Arisaig when I joined in 68.

Juergen
8th February 2016, 14:58
I sailed in the Naess Spirit 3rd Eng.in 1960 when she lost our Prop.in Rio Harbour and where towed to Cape Town to get the Spare fitted which fell on the
Ground,breking off a Tip.Longest Voiage I did,13 Month,10 Days.Any Body around from these days.I was the German Eng. Juergen��

Howieneilbaby
2nd August 2016, 08:24
On a cold wet day in NSW what do you do but read a book, so I read "Iron Ships" a history of BHP shipping, when I got to the Naess Cavalier it reported that the crew accommodation had to be up-graded but the midships had to be down-graded to meet Aussie standards for officers! I was an apprentice on the maiden trip Cpt E. Warman - better known as Piggy lived mid ships, smoked and drank all the sample packs and ate a very different menu to the rest of the crew. I was put ashore after leaving three toes at number 8 hatch in Japan and if anyone has found them I'd be glad to get them back! To this day I am not sure if I really enjoyed myself on this trip but I learned heaps from the crew and the Aberdeen morse code from dear EARNEST which is why I struggled with morse code for the rest of my life. I'd be interested to hear from other "Cavaliers".

George Bis
2nd August 2016, 09:40
On a cold wet day in NSW what do you do but read a book, so I read "Iron Ships" a history of BHP shipping, when I got to the Naess Cavalier it reported that the crew accommodation had to be up-graded but the midships had to be down-graded to meet Aussie standards for officers! I was an apprentice on the maiden trip Cpt E. Warman - better known as Piggy lived mid ships, smoked and drank all the sample packs and ate a very different menu to the rest of the crew. I was put ashore after leaving three toes at number 8 hatch in Japan and if anyone has found them I'd be glad to get them back! To this day I am not sure if I really enjoyed myself on this trip but I learned heaps from the crew and the Aberdeen morse code from dear EARNEST which is why I struggled with morse code for the rest of my life. I'd be interested to hear from other "Cavaliers".

The mind boggles!

Varley
2nd August 2016, 10:58
I also heard the story of Ozzy union envy. Unless everyone had a double bunk they were not permitted. Planks being installed to blank off one half of any doubles. Never saw it myself (nor Ernie Warman which, some say, is my good fortune).

Thomson
2nd August 2016, 16:44
I sailed in the Naess Spirit 3rd Eng.in 1960 when she lost our Prop.in Rio Harbour and where towed to Cape Town to get the Spare fitted which fell on the
Ground,breking off a Tip.Longest Voiage I did,13 Month,10 Days.Any Body around from these days.I was the German Eng. Juergen��
An interesting ship I was Superintendent for her when she reverted to her owners. There was a sequel to your experience a decade later. If you are still interested contact me for an update. Thomson.

George Bis
2nd August 2016, 18:15
I also heard the story of Ozzy union envy. Unless everyone had a double bunk they were not permitted. Planks being installed to blank off one half of any doubles. Never saw it myself (nor Ernie Warman which, some say, is my good fortune).

The story I heard was a ship that was unloading in Ozzy and a strike was called because an A.B. was chipping paint on the forecastle. "Couldn't hear a vital order" was the excuse. "You Ozzy,s are all the same" cried the Mate. He got the reply "I'm no from, Ozzy, I'm from Dumbarton!"

John Cassels
2nd August 2016, 20:58
On a cold wet day in NSW what do you do but read a book, so I read "Iron Ships" a history of BHP shipping, when I got to the Naess Cavalier it reported that the crew accommodation had to be up-graded but the midships had to be down-graded to meet Aussie standards for officers! I was an apprentice on the maiden trip Cpt E. Warman - better known as Piggy lived mid ships, smoked and drank all the sample packs and ate a very different menu to the rest of the crew. I was put ashore after leaving three toes at number 8 hatch in Japan and if anyone has found them I'd be glad to get them back! To this day I am not sure if I really enjoyed myself on this trip but I learned heaps from the crew and the Aberdeen morse code from dear EARNEST which is why I struggled with morse code for the rest of my life. I'd be interested to hear from other "Cavaliers".

Did 16 months on her as apprentice from June '64 to August '65.
Masters were N.A.MacDonald relieved by W.C. ( sh**house) Taylor who in turn relieved again by Norman Angus. There was so much
midships accomodation , I had the 4th.mates room .
Spent about 10 months on the Chili - Japan Iron ore run , and what one could do in those days with a couple of bars of Lux toilet soap ......

randcmackenzie
2nd August 2016, 23:18
I also heard the story of Ozzy union envy. Unless everyone had a double bunk they were not permitted. Planks being installed to blank off one half of any doubles. Never saw it myself (nor Ernie Warman which, some say, is my good fortune).

Don't miscall him too much, Dave, I believe he is still going strong, though I haven't felt the need to enquire too closely!

Varley
3rd August 2016, 02:15
Hearsay only, Roddie, and that's not evidence. Possibly libel but certainly not evidence.

(And I wish few ill, although if I knew where my neighbour's ashes were scattered I would have a pint and go and make sure they were much too damp for the grass to catch. No one from the Diamond D reached that. Well....)

Howieneilbaby
4th August 2016, 06:39
J C You are ahero we shared a cabin down aft for 10 months very basic Iused to go on boared the cavalier from time to time inPort Kembla if we were loading steel at the next berth she needed a lick. of paint . Aussie seamen are allergic to that past time .I met up with the good E WARMAN in Rotterdam years later, he was his charming self took all credit that I was 2nd mate

Howieneilbaby
4th August 2016, 06:44
An interesting ship I was Superintendent for her when she reverted to her owners. There was a sequel to your experience a decade later. If you are still interested contact me for an update. Thomson.

Yes I would like an up date regards NEIL