Glasgow Nautical College.

Brandane62
26th May 2014, 19:20
I was passing the landmark that is Glasgow College of Nautical Studies the other day. It is being demolished to make way for some new fangled building which will form a "campus" for some re-named Glasgow college whose name escapes me. The old accommodation block has already gone, and the main building is soon to meet the same fate. Quite sad when I think about the good times I had there, even if it was only for 6 months or so. Nautical Science ONC course 1/30, August 1979 to January 1980 (plus a 2 week bonus for dummies like me who failed the nav-aids course and had to re-sit. Drink may have had something to do with that!).

Burntisland Ship Yard
27th May 2014, 18:10
No doubt the college will be remembered by many, including the local watering facilities !

Stephen J. Card
27th May 2014, 18:40
Clelland and The Riverside.

I remember one lad in ONC.... as soon as he could 'finish' (aka 1100) a paper on the finals he would hoof over to the Clelland and pis*ed and then back at next paper by 1300! Every day of the exams.

Riverside... up for master's... seems to be popular for the lecturers as well. It was more serious about the work then... would have a pie and mushy peas... and a small bottle of ginger beer.

GCNS... good crowd.

Douglas Watkinson as Head
Watford
Callender
Crozier
Douglas
HH Brown
Ian Pearson
Porrie (sp)
George ...... ah can't remember his last... Bearsden
Moore LaMay (maths)
Tony.... young lad.... talk us up the Cobbler.
Signals.....

... must be more than that.

Stephen

Gulpers
27th May 2014, 22:07
Clelland and The Riverside.

I remember one lad in ONC.... as soon as he could 'finish' (aka 1100) a paper on the finals he would hoof over to the Clelland and pis*ed and then back at next paper by 1300! Every day of the exams.

Riverside... up for master's... seems to be popular for the lecturers as well. It was more serious about the work then... would have a pie and mushy peas... and a small bottle of ginger beer.

GCNS... good crowd.

Douglas Watkinson as Head
Watford
Callender
Crozier
Douglas
HH Brown
Ian Pearson
Porrie (sp)
George ...... ah can't remember his last... Bearsden
Moore LaMay (maths)
Tony.... young lad.... talk us up the Cobbler.
Signals.....

... must be more than that.

Stephen

Not Watford Stephen - wasn't the deputy Whiteford?
Capt Gordon
Tony? - fair haired lad - was he Tony Young?
Naismith - drove a Jaguar XJ6 or a Daimler. (?HUH)

Stephen J. Card
27th May 2014, 22:20
Not Watford Stephen - wasn't the deputy Whiteford?
Capt Gordon
Tony? - fair haired lad - was he Tony Young?
Naismith - drove a Jaguar XJ6 or a Daimler. (?HUH)

Right.... Whiteford.
Yes, George Gordon.
Tony Young... ex Denholms.
Naismith

and one other..... fast car.... thought it was Jag also.

Stephen J. Card
27th May 2014, 23:49
That was the one.... Jim Milligan. Maths, Physics as well as general nav, seamanship etc.

Gulpers
28th May 2014, 12:33
Hmm ..... City of Glasgow College doesn't have any nautical ring to it. Maybe it's because we are all so used to Glasgow College of Nautical Studies. That said, I remember when GCNS was being built, there was a rumour that it was going to be named Clyde University of Nautical Technology. (EEK)

It was also suggested that it could be named Kelvin University of Nautical Technology to avoid embarrassment. (Jester)

Stephen J. Card
28th May 2014, 12:52
Every time we try to say anything on SN were come up with someone who makes smutty remarks and non-PC.

Well done!!!



One more lecturer.... Milne.

Drummond.... the brothers teaching at the C.U.N.. sorry GCNS.

One was Nav staff and his twin brother was in Eng staff. The onefrom Eng used to 'try' to teach engineering to Masters. He was in an earlier life a 2nd Eng on QUEEN MARY.



Must be a lot studens who remember the Engineering lecturers... and Radio also?

Stephen

Gulpers
28th May 2014, 13:13
Yes, you are spot on with those names too Stephen.
I used to enjoy Capt Porrie's Met lectures - it was always a bit of a challenge trying to cut through his thick accent.
I just can not remember the Yeoman's name, wasn't he from Devon/Cornwall way?

Gulpers
28th May 2014, 13:19
Abercrombie was another one who used to teach Social and Political stuff.

Stephen J. Card
28th May 2014, 16:40
Yes, you are spot on with those names too Stephen.
I used to enjoy Capt Porrie's Met lectures - it was always a bit of a challenge trying to cut through his thick accent.
I just can not remember the Yeoman's name, wasn't he from Devon/Cornwall way?



Challenge to cut accents? I left a small island in mid Atlantic and went from NAESS PIONEER then straight to GCNS... you are joking?!!! Actually did quite well. On PIONEER Jr Engineer Alastair Cuthill spent a few hours with a bottle of whisky and he learned me how say 'GTF'... 'Git tae Fuc*'!!!! After that... easy! ;-) A another few dances at Highlander's Institute.... another experience.

The Yeoman... can't remember, but I remember on day standing up his box waving his signal flags.... "Remember lads when you get up for Examiner.... I drink black rum!"

Back to Alastair Cuthill. First class mate... killed in motorcycle... about '72. His mandolin playing was magic!

Stephen

Stephen J. Card
28th May 2014, 16:44
Abercrombie was another one who used to teach Social and Political stuff.


We were put to Abercrombie for a class for ONC for 'Social Studies'. His first class we had a real row over his 'political' nonsense... way too 'red'. We complained to Head of Department and took us for extra maths.

Stephen

Gulpers
28th May 2014, 17:42
Not Watford Stephen - wasn't the deputy Whiteford?
Capt Gordon
Tony? - fair haired lad - was he Tony Young?
Naismith - drove a Jaguar XJ6 or a Daimler. (?HUH)

Having a rethink, Tony the fair haired bloke - was his surname maybe Wright, not Young? (?HUH)

Alistair Macnab
28th May 2014, 17:51
When I went to Glasgow for second mates, the classes were held in the venerable Royal College of Science and Technology on Duke Street, now Strathclyde University.
Nautical studies were on the first floor on the left-hand side as one went in the front door.

But when I went back for Mates and Masters, we were across the road opposite the former nautical studies windows in a converted church.

The purpose-built college on Thistle Street (?) had yet to be conceived and built So it looks like it has only been used for about 50 years. Torn down? What a waste of public money!

Signals and radar observer were conducted at Irvine Harbour which was handy for me as I lived in Ayrshire.

RHL
29th May 2014, 12:29
GCNS, was it not a Mk 10 Jag that George? Baldwin drove? and signals man = Palmer? Open to correction by more alive grey cells!

Stephen J. Card
29th May 2014, 13:06
Getting better at this/

George Gordon who had the dark blue jag.
Jim Milligan also had a small fast car.
Yeoman.... yes Palmer
and Tony Wright.
Baldwin also.

Thinking someone else who ran simulator courses.


When up for masters I decided to go to the school at Tower Hill in London. Sit up a nice flat at Nell Gwynn House... and a short ride to Tower Hill. The first morning on Monday of the course said 'Tutorial'. So.... with nothing to do... the lecturer just said, "Study your books." No printed handouts... just handwrite everything down. No lecturers to ask about problems, they had a huge book with all the questions in and answers. Go to the book, check out the number and then self check yourself. It was dreadful.... about 16 in the class. Crowded. After 3 week I decided to chuck it. Called Helen quickly and got myself on back on board LOCH LOMOND. Helen even called Tower Hill and told them I was required back on board... so got all my course fees back. ;-)

Was smart enough to go later back GCNS!

Stephen

John Cassels
29th May 2014, 18:30
None of them a patch on the old Watt Memorial College in Greenock ( says me
with tongue in cheek !.).

Stephen J. Card
29th May 2014, 18:45
None of them a patch on the old Watt Memorial College in Greenock ( says me
with tongue in cheek !.).


Same lecturers just bigger house!

Was Watt a small college for nav department? Must have been hundreds go through Glasgow doing tickets for the last 150 years!

I have a pal who did Liverpool and is always to say that my ticket was inferior... just joking of course. Bast*rd!

Stephen

Robert Bush
29th May 2014, 21:15
Early 1952 after discharging iron ore at Rothsay dock arrived Greenock to convert from coal to oil. As 2nd Mate did night watches and went to Glasgow Tech by bus for my Mate's. Rember excellent ship construction lectures with trips to shipyards. The Lecturer was A Greenock Morton football player. Have forgotten his name.

Stephen J. Card
29th May 2014, 23:48
One of Denholm's master Calum McPhee.... I belive he studied for masters in a POW camp in the Far East. Probably enough 'lecturers' to help!

MikeSmith
30th May 2014, 15:54
George Gordon was (in fact may well still be) working as a Compass Adjuster on the Clyde until recently. Occasionally swung the compass for Calmac ships coming out of Garvel drydock.

Donald McGhee
30th May 2014, 22:24
I remember the old college in martha Street, off George Square where the Hatches, Matches and Dispatches building was. Back in 1964. Never saw the "new" bulding that's now being demolished.
Remember the old Yeoman, ex RN, nice old guy, who taught us signals and Morse. This was generally after lunch when we had been to the Dog House for a liquid lunch. I think Capt. Corse was the principal then.
On the pre sea courses we used to sail on Bardowie loch in Enterprise dinghies.
Good old days eh?

Stephen J. Card
31st May 2014, 00:48
First time up to GCNS was January 1971. The college was new and watched the first last blocks of Gorbals X being demolished. The Planetarium was interesting, but only ever got to used a few times. Lifeboat tickets down at Troon and sailing round The Kyles of Bute as far as Campeltown in the ROBERT GORDON. Never did take to sail boats!

Seemed that a lot of the J&J cadets were ex Glasgow. If you were from the area you went Shields. If from outside from Glasgow then you were better close to 120 St Vincent Street. Three of us from J&J, eight from SSM and one lonely from Stornoway lad was with Bank Line.

Hostel was just up from Hillfoot. Posh place. 12 cadets, matron and a couple of helpers, a few several foreman, gardners etc... and a donkey in the paddock. Food was good. Once came down shooting up in Auchterarder one end... came back with a rabbit and have it stew on Monday evening. Evening a drink in the Burnbrae Hotel. What a great way to live. No wonder we liked it.

Stephen

duncs
31st May 2014, 03:44
One of Denholm's master Calum McPhee.... I belive he studied for masters in a POW camp in the Far East. Probably enough 'lecturers' to help!

Stephen, it was Germany, Milag Nord I think. In his later years with J&J he was in Germany with his wife Mary(possibly standing by a v/l, or PR?). One of the German bigwigs there turned out to have been the gunnery officer on the 'Scharnhorst', at the time it had sank his vessel. He gave Calum a very nice souvenir from 'Scharnhorst'.

I was at GCNS(radio) 69-71, whilst it was still being built. Was it Mountbatten who officially opened it? I was there, but my memory is poor. I'm sorry to hear it is being scrapped.

Incidentally, I was RO on the 'Loch Lomond' when she was handed over early 81. Was that you that did the painting of her, in the Off's smokeroom? I don't know if anyone took it with him. John Corrin was OM at the time.

regards

Duncs

Stephen J. Card
31st May 2014, 11:13
Duncs,

Thanks for that info re Capt McPhee. DL Ross was 3/O in the PIONEER in 70 and was always telling me about Mc Phee and how great things were on the NAESS CHAMPION. Like an idiot I asked Training Manager and thought it would be great to sent to one of the tankers. Yeah... I got to WARWICK FORT!

I remember there was a plaque in the college and it was Mountbatten who opened it.

I remember hearing that painting someone had it. Kempsell or Frank Brown? Must be worth a fortune by now. ;-)

Was sad to say farewell of the LOCH boats. While you were packing up on the LOMOND I was on the MAREE up in Sharjah. Funny how things happen. On the of the departure from the yard of LOMOND the first party on board was held in to the large cadet's cabin. Everyone crammed inside for a good drink or two. Six years later.... last farewell of the crowd as they were heading to the airport to go home.... the last party was then in the cadets cabin. Last job was to go aft and take the ensign down. Everyone left, but I remained for a few days to see the last of the cargo out.

About a year later I went for a holiday across Canada then came down to LA and went to visit old QUEEN MARY. There sitting at Pier A, Berth 2... AL SALAMA. Went aboard and spent a great evening on board. Should have joined Salen.... had ended up with Uiterwyk Lines... good small outfit also.

ninabaker
2nd June 2014, 00:13
Fascinating stuff. I never attended GCNS but have lived in the city 27 years now and even now no one calls it anything but the Nautical College, despite that the nautical part has been only a small bit for years. The new college will presumably have an even smaller proportion for the nautical stuff.

There is a VERY fancy jetty with all sorts of davits and so forth for launching lifeboats. Only slight snag is that there is now only about 2 foot of water there, since the Clyde Port Authority see no point in dredging now there isn't any river traffic. I hear the gravity-slope launcher cannot be used at all without burying the boat in the river bed.

To add insult to injury the river is to be shut for the Commonwealth Games because it is considered 'too risky' to allow it to be used apart from when the RYA sail up in a convoy of dinghies to the old Canting Basin (the dinghy skippers have been told their boats must have no alcohol!). The last remaining tourist boat has been told he cannot operate at all as all the swinging bridges cannot be opened for his boats.

What is the poor Clyde coming to?

nina

Stephen J. Card
2nd June 2014, 02:20
Fascinating stuff. I never attended GCNS but have lived in the city 27 years now and even now no one calls it anything but the Nautical College, despite that the nautical part has been only a small bit for years. The new college will presumably have an even smaller proportion for the nautical stuff.

There is a VERY fancy jetty with all sorts of davits and so forth for launching lifeboats. Only slight snag is that there is now only about 2 foot of water there, since the Clyde Port Authority see no point in dredging now there isn't any river traffic. I hear the gravity-slope launcher cannot be used at all without burying the boat in the river bed.

To add insult to injury the river is to be shut for the Commonwealth Games because it is considered 'too risky' to allow it to be used apart from when the RYA sail up in a convoy of dinghies to the old Canting Basin (the dinghy skippers have been told their boats must have no alcohol!). The last remaining tourist boat has been told he cannot operate at all as all the swinging bridges cannot be opened for his boats.

What is the poor Clyde coming to?

nina

Perhaps the city is doing well, but the river is forgotten! Sad.

I remember one lad fell out the boat near the college... and ended up is hospital.... not drowning... just caught something else nasty!

If you have lived in Glasgow you probably love it by know. Special spot for me for sure. Good city and lots of good people and shipmates.

And of course... and the best Nautical College!

Stephen

duncs
2nd June 2014, 03:51
Fascinating stuff. I never attended GCNS but have lived in the city 27 years now and even now no one calls it anything but the Nautical College, despite that the nautical part has been only a small bit for years. The new college will presumably have an even smaller proportion for the nautical stuff.

There is a VERY fancy jetty with all sorts of davits and so forth for launching lifeboats. Only slight snag is that there is now only about 2 foot of water there, since the Clyde Port Authority see no point in dredging now there isn't any river traffic. I hear the gravity-slope launcher cannot be used at all without burying the boat in the river bed.

To add insult to injury the river is to be shut for the Commonwealth Games because it is considered 'too risky' to allow it to be used apart from when the RYA sail up in a convoy of dinghies to the old Canting Basin (the dinghy skippers have been told their boats must have no alcohol!). The last remaining tourist boat has been told he cannot operate at all as all the swinging bridges cannot be opened for his boats.

What is the poor Clyde coming to?

nina

Nina, when GCNS opened, it was a new, very exciting, vibrant college to attend. All unimagined extras, i.e. swimming pool, gymnasium, cafeteria(for those who could afford it, usually only cadets). A planetarium(I was only in it once, and slept soundly). I believe a telescope was intended to be fitted.
As you'll be aware, the British MN was at a peak at the time, and companies were desperate for cadets, as well as ROs. All joining, expecting jobs for life.
GCNS, on behalf of shipowners, catered for these intakes.
Sadly, as we are all too aware, the bubble inevitably burst.
Most ex early GCNS students remember it fondly. Not to mention(remembering) the City itself.

Duncs

sandhopper
12th July 2014, 18:17
We were put to Abercrombie for a class for ONC for 'Social Studies'. His first class we had a real row over his 'political' nonsense... way too 'red'. We complained to Head of Department and took us for extra maths.

Stephen

Was he the individual with the 70s style heavy perm? I bumped into an engine wallah in Edinburgh a number of years later and was assured that 'perm' was a double comb over.

It seems that aber was crossing that main deck (below canteen and above the swimming pool) in high winds. The double comb over was revealed.

randcmackenzie
12th July 2014, 23:35
One of Denholm's master Calum McPhee.... I belive he studied for masters in a POW camp in the Far East. Probably enough 'lecturers' to help!

Duncs is correct, it was Milag Nord, but it was his Second Mate's he took there - he was at the time a chippy with Prince Line.

The Red Cross brought in the papers and the exams were set in camp.

My uncle was there with him. In my Uncle's case he passed the exam, but on his release had to go back to sea on deck to get in the requisite sea time before being issued with the certificate.

I would suppose that if Calum had the standard 36 months seatime served, then he would have been issued with the certificate right away.

B/R.

McHaggis
22nd August 2014, 15:36
Very sad news to hear that they are pulling the old college down. I did all of my cadet-ship at the college plus all my other tickets over the long & coming years. I was last there in 2006 to do some of my Chief Part A's.

It was a great college when I was a cadet and also when i first went back to do my 2nd's in 1996, changed a lot but for the better.

Suppose the Nautical side was always on the decline and not sure what will be the future. Might have to have a look on their www & see the news.

sandhopper
27th August 2014, 08:31
Very sad news to hear that they are pulling the old college down...
Suppose the Nautical side was always on the decline and not sure what will be the future. Might have to have a look on their www & see the news..

The rot set in during the 70s according to some. Then sometime around 1996 they appointed the first female principal. Seems she was a part time sociology lecturer at the college. Sort of indicated the general downward trend in nautical studies. I suppose the college did what was necessary to survive, including that tie in with India.

Wasn't there student grumblings over quality of teaching after 2000? Might explain why there is a private nautical institute in Clydebank.

Purser52
7th September 2014, 12:03
Much later than the period described in earlier posts but members may recall Captain Chris Hunter as Principal - would have been early 90s(?) He had been Principal of the National Sea Training College at Gravesend but took up the Principal's position at Glasgow afterwards. Absolute gent - very quietly spoken and always immaculately dressed. I recall he sadly died very suddenly whilst still Glasgow Principal.

pelerous
13th February 2015, 13:57
Clelland and The Riverside.

I remember one lad in ONC.... as soon as he could 'finish' (aka 1100) a paper on the finals he would hoof over to the Clelland and pis*ed and then back at next paper by 1300! Every day of the exams.

Riverside... up for master's... seems to be popular for the lecturers as well. It was more serious about the work then... would have a pie and mushy peas... and a small bottle of ginger beer.

GCNS... good crowd.

Douglas Watkinson as Head
Watford
Callender
Crozier
Douglas
HH Brown
Ian Pearson
Porrie (sp)
George ...... ah can't remember his last... Bearsden
Moore LaMay (maths)
Tony.... young lad.... talk us up the Cobbler.
Signals.....

... must be more than that.

Stephen
The Princendam has a fine painting of The Princendam in the main companionway by a certain Steven J Card.

CompassNorth
13th February 2015, 15:17
Staff at GCNS
Harold Brown(Lt Commander H H Brown DSC and bar)
Ian Pearson(Lt Commander Ian Andrew Pearson DSc and bar)
John Corse, Adam Hunter, Bill Blezard, Donald Kennedy, Danny Waters, Douglas Watkinson, Kenny Walace, Alex Warden, Alistair Crozier, Moore LeMay, Bill Whiteford, Alistair Douglas MBE, Andrew Callendar, George Gordon, Veet Poray, Jim Milligan, John Robson, Dick(Charlie) Adams, George Baldwin, Elaine Ives, David Clubb, David Lewis, John McEnaney, Gordon Mawson, Jim Campbell, Charles Luny, George Naismith, Muir Porter, Gordon Milne, X Turner, Malcolm Linklater, Malcolm Maclachlan, John Swan, Roddy Gillespie, Dick(Charlie) Hill, Brian Davies, Douglas Brown, Sam Macdonald, Maurice Cornish, JEFF Foreshaw, Duncan Drumond, Richard Speight, Tony Wright, John Young,

CompassNorth
13th February 2015, 15:39
Hi Mike,
George Gordon is still going round in circles swinging compasses.
Hebridean Princess on Monday.
George

Burntisland Ship Yard
15th February 2015, 18:42
I am now way behind the times, with the demise of G.C.N.S, where do cadets do their respective phases [if that's what you call them now].....

Stephen J. Card
15th February 2015, 19:34
The Princendam has a fine painting of The Princendam in the main companionway by a certain Steven J Card.

Guilty! As well as several pieces on board he vessel.

Painting? I enjoyed painting as a cadet..... the chipping and painting type. Even as mate I enjoyed handling brushes and rollers as well!

CompassNorth
15th February 2015, 22:45
Guilty! As well as several pieces on board he vessel.

Painting? I enjoyed painting as a cadet..... the chipping and painting type. Even as mate I enjoyed handling brushes and rollers as well!
There was a great deal of ability in the students at GCNS.
One candidate for 1st Mate managed to draw a three dimensional sketch of a tween deck in way of a bulkhead when the question asked for a damage report following a collision.
The same candidate noticed that a photo in Nicholls seamanship of an aluminium superstructure did not show the sandwich construction, to obviate corrosion between the steel and aluminium, that was taught by the lecturer.
The lecturer found out that the scantlines of the aluminium had been increased to allow for corrosion.
At the end of the course he asked if he could have the students sketches.
The reply quite rightly was 'cost you'.
About 5 years ago a conversation with a lady on holiday in Donegal revealed that she knew the candidate, lived close to him, and was instrumental in persuading his parents in allowing him to go to sea.

Stephen J. Card
15th February 2015, 23:24
Scotland's most famous caricature artist....

Neil Kempsell

GCNS.... Nav Cadet to 2/M then art college in Edinburgh.

All the way with J&J! (Denholm)

Brilliant artist!

Stephen J. Card
15th February 2015, 23:29
[QUOTE=CompassNorth;1277538]There was a great deal of ability in the students at GCNS.
QUOTE]



Bearsden?

George?

Ah, never quite made it to Bearsden.... but did spent six months at the Hillfoot Hilton... 1971.

Stephen

CompassNorth
16th February 2015, 16:43
Staff at GCNS
Harold Brown(Lt Commander H H Brown DSC and bar)
Ian Pearson(Lt Commander Ian Andrew Pearson DSc and bar)
John Corse, Adam Hunter, Bill Blezard, Donald Kennedy, Danny Waters, Douglas Watkinson, Kenny Walace, Alex Warden, Alistair Crozier, Moore LeMay, Bill Whiteford, Alistair Douglas MBE, Andrew Callendar, George Gordon, Veet Poray, Jim Milligan, John Robson, Dick(Charlie) Adams, George Baldwin, Elaine Ives, David Clubb, David Lewis, John McEnaney, Gordon Mawson, Jim Campbell, Charles Luny, George Naismith, Muir Porter, Gordon Milne, X Turner, Malcolm Linklater, Malcolm Maclachlan, John Swan, Roddy Gillespie, Dick(Charlie) Hill, Brian Davies, Douglas Brown, Sam Macdonald, Maurice Cornish, JEFF Foreshaw, Duncan Drumond, Richard Speight, Tony Wright, John Young,
I missed Derek Robbie

CompassNorth
17th February 2015, 15:47
I am now way behind the times, with the demise of G.C.N.S, where do cadets do their respective phases [if that's what you call them now].....
Hi,
I too am well out of date as I retired years ago but there are still cadet classes although I do not know the study or certificate structure.
Suggest that you Google GCNS
George

pelerous
19th February 2015, 21:12
GCNS Photo

Orkney
27th March 2015, 14:19
What about little Club? I think he taught Nav and maths?
Also Elaine Ives taught meteorology.

CompassNorth
27th March 2015, 14:35
What about little Club? I think he taught Nav and maths?
Also Elaine Ives taught meteorology.
Yes. David Clubb and Elaine Ives are both still very well.

Falkirk Bairn
2nd April 2015, 06:17
Seeing all this about the Glasgow Nautical College has triggered a burst of nostalgia in this ancient mariner. I was in the Cadet Course 1958/59 year. The College was part of the Royal College of Science and Technology in those days and it was the first year that it was in the old church across the road from the main college. Captain Baldwin was in charge of the Cadets in that year, when I went back for Second Mates in 1963 he was then going Second Mates and Captain Douglas was i/c Cadets. We had a great bunch of lads in the course, 25 of us as I remember . Captain Corse was the Superintendent. Are there any of that vintage still around? I went off to New Zealand after Masters in 1970 and have been knocking round the antipodes ever since. Retired from the Port Kembla Pilot Service 2008 and I'd be delighted to hear from any of that year

pelerous
2nd April 2015, 19:43
Seeing all this about the Glasgow Nautical College has triggered a burst of nostalgia in this ancient mariner. I was in the Cadet Course 1958/59 year. The College was part of the Royal College of Science and Technology in those days and it was the first year that it was in the old church across the road from the main college. Captain Baldwin was in charge of the Cadets in that year, when I went back for Second Mates in 1963 he was then going Second Mates and Captain Douglas was i/c Cadets. We had a great bunch of lads in the course, 25 of us as I remember . Captain Corse was the Superintendent. Are there any of that vintage still around? I went off to New Zealand after Masters in 1970 and have been knocking round the antipodes ever since. Retired from the Port Kembla Pilot Service 2008 and I'd be delighted to hear from any of that year
Hi Falkirk Bairn,
Run your eye over the list above and see if you recognise any of the names.
Alistair Douglas is still going strong and I see him at lunch at least twice a year.
When you were there for 2nd Mate I was up for Master.
If you were there for Master it would probably be in the new building That is now being demolished and replaced. See photo above.
Not the same at all.

Falkirk Bairn
3rd April 2015, 07:37
G'Day from Australia pelerous. I do indeed remember a few of the names. Captain Kennedy was in charge of Mates when I was there. Alec Warden did the Radar Observer at Ardrossan.Andrew Callendarwith a ferocious Kelvinside accent I remember It was a first class school. I started Masters at Plymouth but went back to Glasgow, nothing wrong with the school really, too many good pubs in the West Country. When you were up for Masters did you strike an old friend of mine, now sadly crossed the bar? Norman Liddle, hailed from Oban, served his time with Blue Star then he was longtime with Australian National Line. You would have been up around the same time I think.

pelerous
3rd April 2015, 20:16
G'Day from Australia pelerous. I do indeed remember a few of the names. Captain Kennedy was in charge of Mates when I was there. Alec Warden did the Radar Observer at Ardrossan.Andrew Callendarwith a ferocious Kelvinside accent I remember It was a first class school. I started Masters at Plymouth but went back to Glasgow, nothing wrong with the school really, too many good pubs in the West Country. When you were up for Masters did you strike an old friend of mine, now sadly crossed the bar? Norman Liddle, hailed from Oban, served his time with Blue Star then he was longtime with Australian National Line. You would have been up around the same time I think.
Hi Falkirk Bairn,
Unfortunately Donald Kennedy, Alex Warden and Andrew Callander have all crossed the bar years ago.
Sorry Norman Liddle does not ring a bell.
Two of the Plymouth staff Maurice Cornish and JEF Forshaw moved up to Glasgow in the eighties.
When were you up for Masters?

weatherwise
4th April 2015, 10:04
Attended Captain Kennedy's funeral with classmate Alan Henderson when up for Masters. Great bloke and teacher.

Falkirk Bairn
5th April 2015, 03:42
Hi pelerous, I would have passed Masters around September 1969. I'm not at home right now and can't consult my Ticket. I went back for another period with the RFA after passing then set off for New Zealand in December 1970. The only two lecturers from Plymouth I remember were Captains Derret and Danton who both had textbooks published (good ones too) I can't remember who was taking the Master's class at Glasgow which was indeed down at Thistle Street by that time. Captain Hill seems to ring a bell but I'm not sure.

Falkirk Bairn
5th April 2015, 04:18
I have very fond memories of Donald Kennedy who was in charge of Mates when I was up, I also did a gyro compass course with him. A very good teacher and a great sense of humour. I did hear a story in Australia about his passing, whether true or not I'm not sure. I had to go to AMSA in Canberra when I came over from New Zealand to Aus to get an Australian Master Class 1 issued on the basis of my BOT Certificate. The AMSA Surveyor I dealt with whose name was Donald, and I'm sorry to say I can't remember his second name had been a lecturer at Glasgow (although I hadn't known him there) and knew Donald. In the course of yarning away, as one does, about mutual acquaintances he told me that Donald Kennedy had crossed the bar and reckoned it had happened in the course of a Scotland/ England football match. Scotland scored, Donald jumped up and shouted "it's a goal" and keeled over. If true there would be worse ways to go!

pelerous
7th April 2015, 16:35
Hi Falkirk Bairn,
The surveyors name was probably Donald MacAlister, he taught at Glasgow, went to Singapore and then on to Australia.
The story you have about Donald's passing is not quite right.
It was I believe the European cup and Donald did die at the winning goal.
He was a very interesting character and fellow teacher.
A staunch protestant and fanatical CELTIC supporter!!! That is how interesting he was.
He would not allow anything blue in the house except toilet paper.
He did not usually watch live Celtic matches as it would be a strain on his heart. Unfortunately he made an exception in this case.
You were never sure when he was telling the truth or pulling your leg.
By the way Pelerous and Compass North are one and the same.
I miss spelt pelorus on my PC when I enrolled and do not know how to change it. On my I-pad I use Compassnorth

Falkirk Bairn
20th April 2015, 07:30
Hi pelerous,
Sorry about the delay in responding, travelling back from the Nt to NSW.
Donald MacAlister would have been the man right enough. It was a great moment to find a fellow Scot in the Canberra AMSA office. Donald also filled me in on Danny Waters who had gone from AMSA Surveyor to head of the Nautical College in Launceston and then to Sweden. I never knew Captain Waters at Glasgow. Sadly I saw on the AMC website that he has also recently crossed the bar.

pelerous
24th April 2015, 20:07
Hi pelerous,
Sorry about the delay in responding, travelling back from the Nt to NSW.
Donald MacAlister would have been the man right enough. It was a great moment to find a fellow Scot in the Canberra AMSA office. Donald also filled me in on Danny Waters who had gone from AMSA Surveyor to head of the Nautical College in Launceston and then to Sweden. I never knew Captain Waters at Glasgow. Sadly I saw on the AMC website that he has also recently crossed the bar.
Hi Falkirk Bairn
Danny Waters had, I believe, and interesting time when he was up for Orals at Extra Master.
The Examiner opened the syllabus at 2nd Mate and proceeded to go through every line for 2nd mate, Mate and Master over a period of several days.
He passed.

George Bis
28th April 2015, 13:48
Clelland and The Riverside.

I remember one lad in ONC.... as soon as he could 'finish' (aka 1100) a paper on the finals he would hoof over to the Clelland and pis*ed and then back at next paper by 1300! Every day of the exams.

Riverside... up for master's... seems to be popular for the lecturers as well. It was more serious about the work then... would have a pie and mushy peas... and a small bottle of ginger beer.

GCNS... good crowd.

Douglas Watkinson as Head
Watford
Callender
Crozier
Douglas
HH Brown
Ian Pearson
Porrie (sp)
George ...... ah can't remember his last... Bearsden
Moore LaMay (maths)
Tony.... young lad.... talk us up the Cobbler.
Signals.....

... must be more than that.

Stephen

Crozier and Ian Person did well for me and I had the odd glass at the Clelland.

pelerous
29th April 2015, 20:58
Sadly Ian Pearson crossed the bar several years ago but Alistair Crozier is still going strong.

pelerous
6th May 2015, 20:26
I and others have mentioned Donald Kennedy.
The election has reminded me of this and I know Donald would not mind me telling it.
During an election Donald was having a snooze in his favourite chair at 3 in the after noon when he was awakened by a loudhailer van shouting 'Vote for me'.
Donald was not amused.
At 3 in the morning Donald phoned the candidate, told him that he had been awoken from his slumber by the van and was returning the favour, and that he would NOT be voting for him.

Falkirk Bairn
6th May 2015, 23:48
I have the fondest memories of Donald Kennedy, he was our main man when I was up for Mates. There were many good lecturers at Glasgow but Donald had the happy knack of being able to lecture and keep it enlivened by his pawky sense of humour. Great story about the politician.

pelerous
7th May 2015, 19:52
Another Donald classic.
Donald was in full swing teaching stability to a class of Mates when the door opened and there was a student very sorry for himself as he had just returned from the stability exam and believed he had failed on a free surface question.
Unbeknown to him Donald was looking through his notes when the candidate was recounting this sorry tale.
Suddenly Donald burst out laughing saying he's just failed his stability and he missed my classes on stability.
Make sure you all attend and don't miss any classes.
Donald kept a record on everything.
In todays world it would be totally unacceptable to do this, the candidate would be psychologically scarred for life.
Then, the students knew Donald had there best interests at heart and would do anything that would help them pass.

George Bis
8th May 2015, 15:15
[QUOTE=pelerous;1397706]Another Donald classic.
Donald was in full swing teaching stability to a class of Mates when the door opened and there was a student very sorry for himself as he had just returned from the stability exam and believed he had failed on a free surface question.
Unbeknown to him Donald was looking through his notes when the candidate was recounting this sorry tale.
Suddenly Donald burst out laughing saying he's just failed his stability and he missed my classes on stability.
Make sure you all attend and don't miss any classes.
Donald kept a record on everything.
In todays world it would be totally unacceptable to do this, the candidate would be psychologically scarred for life.
Then, the students knew Donald had there best interests at heart and would do anything that would help them pass.[/QU

George Bis
8th May 2015, 15:19
[QUOTE=pelerous;1397706]Another Donald classic.
Donald was in full swing teaching stability to a class of Mates when the door opened and there was a student very sorry for himself as he had just returned from the stability exam and believed he had failed on a free surface question.
Unbeknown to him Donald was looking through his notes when the candidate was recounting this sorry tale.
Suddenly Donald burst out laughing saying he's just failed his stability and he missed my classes on stability.
Make sure you all attend and don't miss any classes.
Donald kept a record on everything.
In todays world it would be totally unacceptable to do this, the candidate would be psychologically scarred for life.
Then, the students knew Donald had there best interests at heart and would do anything that would help them pass.[/QU

It is a long time since I thought about free surface effect!
He was a great guy although in the 2nd.Mates class I didn't have that much to do with him. Glad to hear that Cpt. Crozier is still going. He was good.

pelerous
16th May 2015, 11:31
Photos of the new college.
Hope that they are attached.
In the second photo the building is, I believe, the new teaching block and the one on the right is the hostel.

ninabaker
16th May 2015, 12:32
Photos of the new college.
Hope that they are attached.
In the second photo the building is, I believe, the new teaching block and the one on the right is the hostel.

But still not enough water (I hear) to launch the gravity boat!
nina

pelerous
16th May 2015, 14:21
Even the lifeboat with one foot draught went aground occaisonally.
For those wondering what is where. The new teaching block is built where the swimming pool and gym used to be. The new hostel is where the old hostel was.
I understand that the 'old' building will soon be demolished and the new building is due to open in August

Stephen J. Card
16th May 2015, 16:26
It was more for the good day down to Ardrossan. The boat was in a boat shed and never mind the lifeboat ticket... it was more of a job to get the boat out of the shed and under the davits!

We were told to take a lunch with us. So.... a nice chunk of cheese, a French loaf and a 1/2 bottle of wine. I remember the lecturer was not amused.

The examiner was climbing into the boat and the ladder was not quite secured. The ladder dropped an inch... enough to catch his thumb. Later we were joking... "Remember the rule of thumb!"

pelerous
16th May 2015, 19:41
The examiner was Captain Frith.
He was sent up to the Royal Infirmary to have his thumb checked. I do not know if it was broken.
in Ardrossan the DTp examiner was taking a group for the lifeboat exam.
The candidate acting in command of the lifeboat did not order the man on the ford fall to let go of the lower block as they were leaving the quay.
Eventually of course he had to and everyone ducked except the examiner.
Another hospital case. The candidate failed!

pelerous
5th June 2015, 21:11
Retired navigation staff June 2015
Left to right
Gordon Milne, Richard Speight, George Gordon, Elain Ives, David Clubb, Derek Robbie, Alistair Douglas, Malcolm Linklater, Muir Porter,
Gordon Mawson

pelerous
5th June 2015, 21:26
Navigation staff lunch June 2015.
Left to right in seating positions.
Derek Robbie, Alistair Douglas, Malcolm Linklater, Muir Porter, Gordon Mawson, Gordon Milne, Richard Speight, George Gordon,
Elaine Ives, David Clubb.

pelerous
10th June 2015, 21:12
Hope these photo's jog a few memories.
From left to right.
David Clubb, Brian Davies, Alistair Douglas, JEF Forshaw, Gordon, Milne, Alistair Crozier, Maurice Cornish, John Swan.
Christmas Lunch 2007.

inandaship
11th June 2015, 11:50
Capt. Maurice Cornish lived in Helensburgh and moved back down south last year to be with his daughter. He was Head of Department at GCNS in 1991, a real gentleman.

pelerous
13th June 2015, 20:20
A few more of the Oldies.
Christmas Lunch 2009

pelerous
13th June 2015, 20:24
George Gordon, Gordon Mawson, Malcolm Linklater, Gordon Milne, Elaine Ives,
Alistair Douglas, David clubb.

joe732
13th June 2015, 23:17
George Gordon, Gordon Mawson, Malcolm Linklater, Gordon Milne, Elaine Ives,
Alistair Douglas, David clubb.


Malcolm Winklater, I always found to be a kindly lecturer, nice guy, his classes were usually a relief from some other lectures.
Elaine Ives was always helpful too, helped me with meteorology which I found to be a somewhat dry subject at times.
By far the best lecturer, in my opinion, during my time there, circa 2000, was Richard Varley.
Always willing to help those struggling, studying after hours, even in subjects he didn't lecture us in, and able to describe the subject matter in more layman like terms, rather than reading it "parrot like" fashion from a text book.
A belated thanks, if any of the three are reading this.

potty
30th July 2015, 19:06
Great pictures and stories on this thread.As I still work at the College, we have now gone full circle and the Riverside Campus will be all deck & engineering again with all other departments up on Cathedral Street,(opening 2016). Riverside is due to open to students on 7/9/15 with the official opening in September sometime,(I think!). I'm based in the MSC, next to the jetty so if you're passing give the door a knock. RGDS Simon.

Brandane62
8th August 2015, 08:57
A few memories of GCNS; nautical studies course ONC 1/30, August 1979 to January 1980......

Initially being given a hard time by other cadets because we happened to work for P&O, but being firm friends and drinking buddies within a few weeks.

Chips with everything, twice a day, in the canteen.
Brown sheets and duvet covers in the hostel.

Nightly visits to "the cath" (Cathadhmara), and a Police raid one night looking for under age drinkers (of which I was one, but I bolted to the downstairs bar and by the time they got to me I was innocently drinking my Coca cola!).

After one particular session in the Cath, followed by a chicken curry and fried rice carry out from the Chinese at St. Enoch Square, going back to the hostel and crashing out. At some point soon afterwards awoke and needed to puke and didn't make it to the sink. Instead it all went on my company blazer which was hung over the back of my chair as we were having a visit the next morning from Mr Charlie Turner (P&O head man for cadets). Despite my best efforts at cleaning the blazer, my fellow passengers in the lift next morning were not impressed. I doubt if Mr Turner was either, but I might have got away with it by blending in with my fellow cadets....

Being blamed for throwing a rubber at the blackboard in one of Mr Clubb's classes, while he was writing on the board with his back to us all. I was sent to the head of department (Captain Davies?) to be dealt with, and explained that it wasn't me. I knew who it was but refused to fire him in. If you're reading this Mr Clubb, it was Robin Taylor from Anchor Line! (He had a Yamaha trailie motorbike and lived in Troon. He used to take Rab Gribben (Denholms) from Fort William down to Troon for the weekends as FW was too far to get to. Rab returned the favour by "befriending" Robin's sister!). Great days.

Watching the Police trainees running past the TV lounge window with their ridiculous haircuts, all dressed in white vests and white shorts, and me saying "widnae catch me doing that pish!". 3 years later there I was running past that very window with my ridiculous haircut........

Lifeboat training on the river and supplying the local jakeys with some afternoon entertainment as they showered us with the dubious contents of the cans/bottles they were holding as we passed under the Victoria Bridge.

George Bis
8th August 2015, 10:33
Great pictures and stories on this thread.As I still work at the College, we have now gone full circle and the Riverside Campus will be all deck & engineering again with all other departments up on Cathedral Street,(opening 2016). Riverside is due to open to students on 7/9/15 with the official opening in September sometime,(I think!). I'm based in the MSC, next to the jetty so if you're passing give the door a knock. RGDS Simon.

It would be nice to see it all again. A few changes since 1979 I expect!

George Porteous
13th August 2015, 20:04
Resuscitated my Masters FG ticket at Glasgow Nautical College late 1995. Remember Capt. Gordon well as a very helpful and supportive person. Unfortunately found the building and surroundings, with all the other courses etc. that went on there, as soulless and as far removed from an Nautical College as you could get, let's hope they build something more akin to what would be more acceptable as an Nautical College! Hopefully they will not make the same mistakes that were made in Leith in the late 70s when they closed down the old College and built a new facility with all the modern facilities in Milton Road, only for it to be taken over by the Jewel and Eskvalley college and the ultimate demise of the Nautical College.
George porteous

pelerous
24th September 2015, 20:06
The Glasgow Herald reported this week that Bill Whiteford died on 12th Sept.2015.
Bill was a lecturer in Belfast, moved to the James Watt Memorial college as head of dept. around 1965.
When the Watt closed 1972? he moved to Glasgow along with Dick(Charlie) Adams and Iain Pearson.
Bill spent much of his time teaching Business and Law to the Masters and examining Radar Observer.
Retired 1993?

Stephen J. Card
24th September 2015, 21:36
I think possibly 1971 or earlier. I was there from that time.

RIP Captain Whiteford. It would be hard to fine a better crowd of nautical lecturers.

Stephen

ninabaker
23rd October 2015, 21:12
Glasgow Nautical College, now ridiculously known as City of Glasgow College Faculty of Nautical Studies (https://www.cityofglasgowcollege.ac.uk/courses/faculty-nautical-studies), is reopening on Monday.

I am honoured to be invited to go along. I hear great things of the new facilities and also that cadet numbers are soaring.
Golden Oldies (like me) may be heartened to learn that some old ways have returned, All the cadets wear uniform for college which means I see them all round the town, and so does the general public. They are also reinstituting a flag mast for occasional ceremonials.
The cadets turned out in force for the MN memorial day in September and there is now pressure to extend that.

I will report back on Monday.

nina

Graham Wallace
16th December 2015, 05:48
Marion/Marian Pettigrew P&O Engineering Cadet (c.a. mid 1970’s)

I recently received an email asking if I had ever heard of a Marion Pettigrew a P&O Engineering Cadet who graduated from Glasgow College of Nautical Studies (GKNS) ‘around 1978’. Now she was not just an Engineering Cadet but possible one of the first females to join P&O in such a rank. If P&O ran an Engineering Cadetship in the manner I know she would possible have started in 1976, but as the statement ‘around 1978’ is not precise let’s say mid 1970’s.

Marion Pettigrew came from the Newarthill area, which I found to be in North Lanarkshire and would account for her time spent, presumably the first two years, at GCNS.

I would be interested to hear if anyone knew her, or even better knows where she is

Graham

Burntisland Ship Yard
16th December 2015, 19:17
If memory serves me brain correctly, when I was doing phase 3 at G.C.N.S during 1977, she had just started phase 1.

pelerous
5th February 2016, 19:50
I have not yet been in the new building but I was on the staff when the 'Old' building opened in August 1968.
Captain John Corse was Head and Richard Hill(Charlie) and Harold Brown were the senior lecturers.
Donald Kennedy with his distinctive sense of humour thought the college should have been called the Kelvin University on Nautical Technology and not GCNS.
He also wrote to the then Glasgow Corporation for a 20% pay rise as we started at 9 instead of 9.30 and had one hour for lunch instead of one and a half, nothing came of that.
The canteen building was not finished but tea and rolls were served in the classroom next to the lift on the 2nd floor by Betty,Teresa and Margaret. Occasionally the steam from the boiler set off the fire alarm.
The navigation dept. was on the 6th, 7th and 8th floors and after about 6 weeks someone noticed that there was no test certificate for the lifts. so for a while we all became much fitter.

George Bis
7th February 2016, 13:24
I have not yet been in the new building but I was on the staff when the 'Old' building opened in August 1968.
Captain John Corse was Head and Richard Hill(Charlie) and Harold Brown were the senior lecturers.
Donald Kennedy with his distinctive sense of humour thought the college should have been called the Kelvin University on Nautical Technology and not GCNS.
He also wrote to the then Glasgow Corporation for a 20% pay rise as we started at 9 instead of 9.30 and had one hour for lunch instead of one and a half, nothing came of that.
The canteen building was not finished but tea and rolls were served in the classroom next to the lift on the 2nd floor by Betty,Teresa and Margaret. Occasionally the steam from the boiler set off the fire alarm.
The navigation dept. was on the 6th, 7th and 8th floors and after about 6 weeks someone noticed that there was no test certificate for the lifts. so for a while we all became much fitter.

I started there in Nov. 1970 in the 2nd.Mates class with Capt.Crosier. At that time there was massive re-development in the area whole streets were being demolished, often leaving the pub until the very last. One story I remember was of one of the class having to climb over a "down and out" on the was to collage." Have you got a couple of bob" cried the d.a.o. "no" cried my classmate "I hope you fail" the d.a.o. shouted after him!

pelerous
19th February 2016, 20:18
The Principal was Bob Marshall from the engineering department at Stow and for a few years there was no deputy.
After 3 maybe 4 years Alec Warden was appointed Deputy Principal after rapid promotion. He was an ordinary lecturer in October, then senior lecturer, Head of Department and then Deputy by Christmas.
I may have the timing slightly wrong but it was very rapid.
It could not have happened to better man. Excellent!

Mazzer
23rd February 2016, 22:48
Marion/Marian Pettigrew P&O Engineering Cadet (c.a. mid 1970’s)

I recently received an email asking if I had ever heard of a Marion Pettigrew a P&O Engineering Cadet who graduated from Glasgow College of Nautical Studies (GKNS) ‘around 1978’. Now she was not just an Engineering Cadet but possible one of the first females to join P&O in such a rank. If P&O ran an Engineering Cadetship in the manner I know she would possible have started in 1976, but as the statement ‘around 1978’ is not precise let’s say mid 1970’s.

Marion Pettigrew came from the Newarthill area, which I found to be in North Lanarkshire and would account for her time spent, presumably the first two years, at GCNS.

I would be interested to hear if anyone knew her, or even better knows where she is

Graham

Hello Graham,
I am she. Marion Pettigrew at GCNS from 1976 to 1980.
Marion

Gulpers
23rd February 2016, 23:48
Marion,

On behalf of the SN Moderators, a warm welcome aboard from the Isle of Anglesey - we guarantee you will thoroughly enjoy the SN experience!
Isn't the Internet wonderful, I'm sure Graham will be in touch soon when he sees your post.
You will certainly spark many happy memories when you have a chance to explore our threads and, who knows, you may even re-establish contact with old shipmates.
Good luck! (Thumb)

pelerous
25th February 2016, 21:33
When the college opened in August 1968 there were no female students, no female teaching staff and there were 5 or 6 girls in the office. They managed to do all that was necessary but that was before we had the efficiency of computers and a paperless society.
The college was completely maritime, Navigation, Engineering and Radio.
The opposite side of Thistle Street was still tenements, a couple of shops and a Cork warehouse.
The Engineering workshops were still up at Springburn and the Hostel was at Hill Street later to move to Bearsden where ASDA now stands.
John Abercrombie, a Liberal Studies lecturer, had the additional responsibility of running the library. So when he was lecturing the library was open and run on an HONESTY basis.
If I remember correctly the first Female student enrolled in the Radio Dept. in the early 70's

Burntisland Ship Yard
26th February 2016, 19:45
Hello Graham,
I am she. Marion Pettigrew at GCNS from 1976 to 1980.
Marion

Welcome to our little world.

Graham Wallace
4th March 2016, 16:34
Hello Graham,
I am she. Marion Pettigrew at GCNS from 1976 to 1980.
Marion

Goodness gracious Marion, I had given up on the original posting , I will send you a shipsnostalgia PM

Graham

pelerous
11th March 2016, 20:19
Famous candidates
Does anyone remember a candidate for HND and 1st Mate(Class 2) who is now a Famous TV chef.

JMR59
12th March 2016, 15:03
Nick Nairn

pelerous
17th March 2016, 22:04
Iain Pearson
A very modest hero
See attachment

John Cassels
18th March 2016, 09:30
Iain Pearson
A very modest hero
See attachment

He was our lecturer pre sea course 1962-1963 , Watt memorial college , Greenock.

pelerous
18th March 2016, 22:13
He was my lecturer in the Watt 1954 and then we were on the staff together at GCNS

pelerous
26th March 2016, 15:25
End of an era.

pelerous
26th March 2016, 15:27
Is this the new age

pelerous
26th March 2016, 15:35
Farewell GCNS

pelerous
16th April 2016, 19:58
I expect that there will be few readers that are old enough to remember Harold H. Brown.
Harold was the son of Charles H. Brown the author of Nicholls Guide and Nicholls Seamanship.
Captain Charles Brown was responsible for taking Nautical education from small private colleges in the side streets into The Royal College of Science and Technology 'the Tech' in 1912, now Strathclyde University.
Harold joined the staff in the Tech around 1935 and as he was in the RNR was called up in 1939.
A very quiet man, always extremely helpful if you approached him but preferred to remain in the background.
As you can see from his war record, a quiet hero.

pelerous
17th April 2016, 15:44
My apologies the attachment did not attach.
Google
uboat.net/allies/commanders
Then search for Brown
Find Harold Hinksman Brown in the list

Google
Lieutenant Harold H Brown RNR

Binnacle
17th April 2016, 17:11
I remember him with respect, I attended a Brown's gyro course at Glasgow Technical College in March 54 where he was the instructor. Thanks to him I always managed to keep the SG Brown gyros I was responsible for functioning. Only one time when the oil pump which supported the main rotor packed up and I had to get a replacement flown to Whyalla. Coincidently when I went on to this site to read your post an RNLI ad popped up, which reminded me that on the last day of the three day course he handed me a sheet of foolscap to write an essay on the gyro, placed alongside the paper was an RNLI collection tin. I understood it was expected of students to place a ten shilling note in the tin. He signed my certificate, I note the principal at that was named Corse. Thanks for posting, people such as him taught us all we needed to know to sail the seas safely.

Falkirk Bairn
18th April 2016, 07:49
I remember Captain Brown very well, another sign that I am now a fully paid up ancient mariner. Captain Brown was our meteorology lecturer when I was up for Masters in 1968 and, as I was in the cadet course at Glasgow and did all my Certificates there I was well aware of him. A man of outstanding intelligence and what a body of knowledge!

George Bis
24th April 2016, 09:49
Any connection with Brown,Son and Ferguson Ltd. nautical publishers based not far from the Exam Room at Eglerton Toll.?

pelerous
24th April 2016, 19:33
I have always believed that there was a connection but I am not sure. If I hear anything more definite I will let you know.

pelerous
25th April 2016, 19:01
If you Google Brown Son & Ferguson website, click on About us and there is the history of the company. There is no mention of Charles or Harold Brown

andy88up.
26th April 2016, 15:42
I did all my Certificates in Glasgow, 2nd Mates in 1963, Mates in 1965, and Masters in 1969. Captains Baldwin, Kennedy, and Hill. I remember Captain Brown took us for one subject in Masters, he also took us into the Planetarium one afternoon, the only time I was there.
Did the radar observers at Ardrossan 1963, and radar simulator at Leith about 1969. That was an interesting experience, with the Commander.
Andy.

Raymond Thompson
13th May 2016, 21:53
Looking for any body who was at Glasgow Nautical College, September 1975, and used to go at the pub across the road/back entrance,(form induction course), or 1978, for 2nd mates/Onc. Remember John Strathearn from Harrison Line and, bye and bye, a lad from P/O who supported Stirling Albion, of all teams?

BobDixon
24th May 2016, 23:36
The last weeks of GCNS - https://youtu.be/uQ13qyaDASg

Irvingman
25th May 2016, 12:29
The last weeks of GCNS - https://youtu.be/uQ13qyaDASg

Ah well. I was going to return Sandy Smith's stapler which somehow came into my possession in 1975. I suppose it's too late now!
[=P]
John

George Bis
26th May 2016, 15:23
The last weeks of GCNS - https://youtu.be/uQ13qyaDASg

Interesting viewing and brought back some memories. Sure I saw the old 2nd.Mates room. Memories of Capt. Crozier, Baldwin etc.
I suppose you could say I got three certificates out of that building.

Knightswood Boy
26th July 2016, 15:54
Havent been back to Glasgow since 1960.theschoolof navigation was in the Royal Technical College,Second Floor.Capt.Macdonald was superintendent circa 1940 -1950s.the school was off George Square ,the watering hole was Clan Bar,Royal Restaurant.HAPPY DAYS.KNIGHTSWOOD BOY

Knightswood Boy
26th July 2016, 16:06
second mate 1955:mates 1956:masters 1959 . ex shell:bank line:oscar gross:Donaldsons 1956 / 1960

Howieneilbaby
27th July 2016, 08:02
2nd M ates 64 then Mates across the river in 65 what was the name of the examiner was it Denns orDent not a bad old bloke helped out with signals and i really needed it vhf rules

Stephen J. Card
27th July 2016, 12:56
I did 2/M and Mates at GCNS. For Master I thought it might be for 'fun' to Tower Hill in London. I lasted for three weeks! The first day at the school the lecturer said, "Tutorial!" We looked bewildered and he said, "Always tutorial on this day."

Twenty four of us in the class. Cramped. NO HANDOUTS!!!!! Everything was out for hand written notes. I had a great flat at Nell Gwenn House off Kings Road. All Arabs and their 'ladies'. Anyhow, I was convinced it would be a waste of time. Called Denholms, they took me out and told them I was required to go back to my ship.... ;-) They were able to get my fees back. Went back to sea... and six months later went up to Glasgow and I was relieved with the old 'team'. Six of us in the class.... perfect. Two of us went up and passed after just three and half months. Later I won a Laurie & Norrie prize of £20.... highest marks for Master's writtens for the whole UK in that year. I'm no 'brain' but GCNS knew how to teach, swot and cram. Callender for Nav. Douglas for Stability, Drummond for Engineering.

Back in '71/'72 I was doing Cadet Correspondence Course. Question: "Descripton: Deep Sea Lead". Went right to the Brown Son & Fergusson, 'Seamanship' by HH Brown. Several months later I had notes come back from the college: "Your answer is 100% correct. However, I would have preferred your own description rather than copied down from 'Seamanship page 84. Signed..... HH Brown." !!!!!

John Cassels
27th July 2016, 19:02
2nd M ates 64 then Mates across the river in 65 what was the name of the examiner was it Denns orDent not a bad old bloke helped out with signals and i really needed it vhf rules

Capt. W Denne was the gentleman in question but would not share your description of him !.

pelerous
3rd August 2016, 20:40
Capt. W Denne was the gentleman in question but would not share your description of him !.

Captain W. Denne wrote an excellent book on the correction of the Magnetic compass. Knowing how much you all loved compass I am sure you cannot wait to get your hands on it.

George Bis
4th August 2016, 07:57
Captain W. Denne wrote an excellent book on the correction of the Magnetic compass. Knowing how much you all loved compass I am sure you cannot wait to get your hands on it.

Perfect for my wife at Christmas!

inandaship
4th August 2016, 11:45
Capt. Denne for Orals was not for the faint hearted, asking a question on how I would lower and raise a telescopic topmast he was not entirely satisfied with my answer and told me to return in the afternoon. On returning in the afternoon he asked me an entirely different question!
Capt. Brown was a quiet gentleman, if I remember correctly I had him for signals, this would be 1960.

George Bis
4th August 2016, 14:41
Capt. Denne for Orals was not for the faint hearted, asking a question on how I would lower and raise a telescopic topmast he was not entirely satisfied with my answer and told me to return in the afternoon. On returning in the afternoon he asked me an entirely different question!
Capt. Brown was a quiet gentleman, if I remember correctly I had him for signals, this would be 1960.

When I was in the Home Trade room one of the class went up for Orals and did fine at everything except the Lifeboat, which he seemed to know nothing off. Three hours the Examiner had him before failing him and ordering him to take a Lifeboat course before coming back! Is this a record?

inandaship
4th August 2016, 15:20
Not sure about that George, you would have expected him to have at least some knowledge of a ship's lifeboat.

George Bis
4th August 2016, 16:21
Not sure about that George, you would have expected him to have at least some knowledge of a ship's lifeboat.

Quite. As I remember it he took a Lifeboat course, past it and wandered about the college muttering "now I am a man!" He then went back to the Exam Room and passed his orals.

Knightswood Boy
7th August 2016, 20:19
re school of navigation.Royal technical college.During the late forties and early fifties.Capt.Kennedy also Capt.H.H>Brown were teaching .Capt Brown was the son of the Author of Browns Nautical Almanac if I remember correctly.

pelerous
8th June 2017, 20:16
GCNS staff lunch June 2017
Left to Right
Muir Porter, Richard Speight, Elaine Ives, Derek Robbie, John McEnaney, Gordon Milne, George Gordon, Alasdair Douglass, Malcolm Linklater, Malcolm Maclachlan

oneofthfew
19th June 2017, 09:59
Brown, Son & Ferguson are the publishers for Nichols Seamanaship and Concise Guide volumes 1 & 2

oneofthfew
20th June 2017, 16:01
I visited the new college campus a few weeks ago, and on entering the foyer you would think you were in some huge hotel! All floors look out onto a central area, maritime has a few floors and simulators near top of building.

George Bis
20th June 2017, 17:16
Sounds good.
Just hope those using it find that their efforts are rewarded.
A couple of weeks ago I was asked how one would set about a career in the M.N. and struggled for an answer.
I am sure the days of "the pool" are long gone!

pelerous
31st July 2017, 20:27
I am told that the two shellfish divers, Iain MacDougall and Ryan McGuckin, who drowned in Castle Bay Barra on Saturday 29-07-2017 were cadets at GCNS in the 1990's.

Winmar
1st August 2017, 09:56
Sounds good.
Just hope those using it find that their efforts are rewarded.
A couple of weeks ago I was asked how one would set about a career in the M.N. and struggled for an answer.
I am sure the days of "the pool" are long gone!

Alas George, there are not to many in our country who still want to go to sea. In an earlier life during the early noughties when I was the operations director for a UK company I instigated a policy to take 8 deck cadets and 8 engineer cadets each year with the entries split over the three college terms. In the first year, we had 106 applications for the first 4 positions and we had the choice of some great candidates. Three of the ones selected all achieved the highest grade certificates and are currently serving as Master, Technical Superintendent and Loading Master at a UK SBM. When I left my role in 2010, we got 3 applicants for 4 positions and we took them all! I don't know what it is like at present, but from carrying out vetting inspections I do not see many Brits in any rank or rating positions, so can only guess? It's very sad!

George Bis
1st August 2017, 18:50
It really is a different world to when I was at sea, 1967/79, there were about 100000 people( mostly men) employed in the British Merchant navy.
Company's were well known in many cases, with UK offices easily found.
Today I haven't any notion how many Britts are at sea or where you would start getting a job.
The only times I have been at sea since has been as a passanger on liners and with crews of 1100 made up of 70+ nationalities employed from agencies.

Derek Dunn
25th October 2017, 07:35
Any engineer cadets who attended GCNS between August 1969 and June 1971; some of us are having a wee get-together next week in Glasgow. Please PM me for details.

pelerous
15th December 2017, 19:25
Sad news
Alistair Crozier passed away peacefully on Wednesday 13th December 2017 two weeks after his 90th birthday.
Alistair joined the GCNS staff in 1968 when the college was in the converted church in John Street and was a member until 1984.
In the mid 70'she returned to sea as Master with Denholm Maclay for a couple of years before returning to the college staff.
I believe he first went to sea in 1944 as a cadet with Donaldsons but someone out there may know different.
All who knew him will be saddened at this news.

George Bis
15th December 2017, 20:47
How sad, I remember him well from the 2nd. Mate class 1970's.
A really nice man and I am glad he had a long life. RIP.

Stephen J. Card
15th December 2017, 22:20
Sad day for sure. Alastair Crozier was a damn good lecturer and better of that, he was just a first class gentleman. All of the lecturers I knew at GCNS were 'first class'. RIP Alastair.

Stephen

oldgoat1947
7th April 2018, 17:59
I was passing the landmark that is Glasgow College of Nautical Studies the other day. It is being demolished to make way for some new fangled building which will form a "campus" for some re-named Glasgow college whose name escapes me. The old accommodation block has already gone, and the main building is soon to meet the same fate. Quite sad when I think about the good times I had there, even if it was only for 6 months or so. Nautical Science ONC course 1/30, August 1979 to January 1980 (plus a 2 week bonus for dummies like me who failed the nav-aids course and had to re-sit. Drink may have had something to do with that!).

I sat my Second Class Steam in 1971 my First Class steam in 1974 and my Motor Endorsement in 1975 all at Glasgow and studied at the Nautical College. Prior to that I sat my OND at the Stow college of Engineering 1965 and my Endorsements at the Stow College Annexe at the Old Loco Works Offices at Springburn 1967 Since then did many of my "Refreshers" at CAMS Leith. Scotland has lost a lot of its Marine Training Centres

George Bis
1st July 2018, 20:07
They say that you acquire knowledge in strange places.
When I was doing Master H.T. in 1975 in GCNS. I was having a smoko in the canteen.
I fell into conversation with a stranger who had just done a trip as Mate on the coast.
My casual question "how did it go" got a lengthy answer. He had carried steel scarf and it had caught fire through spontaneous combustion. Apparently the stuff was impregnated with lube oil.
I had never heard of swarf before but by the end of my break I was a good deal wiser.!
This proved lucky when I was asked "what do you know about steel swarf" doing Orals the following week and I gave the examiner chapter and verse and passed!

alexdron
17th July 2018, 00:19
Any engineer cadets who attended GCNS between August 1969 and June 1971; some of us are having a wee get-together next week in Glasgow. Please PM me for details.

I am staggered by the vintage of some of the contributors here. Utmost respect for all of you.
Well too late for the get-together, but let me chip in for the record...

I was an engineer cadet with BP and joined GCNS in Sept 68 on the OND course, when the college opened.

Fellow engineering cadets in the 68 intake that I remember included (in no particular order):
Bill Kirk, Denholm, Glasgow
Jim Watson, BP, Glasgow
Clive Scott, Ben Line, Falkirk
Ronnie Murning, ?, Glasgow (serious ice hockey player)
Tommy ?, Rothesay
Danny Byrne, BP, Bonnybridge
Ross Macleod, BP, Tain Rossshire
Davie ?, Midlothian, biker with BSA A7 Rocket
John D O’Hare, BP, Auchterarder
John McNamara, Denholm, Busby
Alex Marjoribanks, BP, east of Scotland
John Scott, BP, Perthshire?
Derek Dunbar, Denholm, Keith
Eric Gilroy, Denholm, Bucksburn Aberdeen

Beginning to struggle now, so I'll move on to the GCNS staff...

Bob Marshall. Principal
David Duff, Deputy Principal

Engineering staff I can remember:
Jim McGinniss, maths: absolute star, saved my career and helped me get through BSc ech Eng at Strathclyde in 76.
Jim Gibson, ex NZSC, Thermodynamics
? Jaconelli, Mechanics, great guy. Met him again in the Am Zillertall, Repperbahn, Hamburg, in Dec 70. Hopefully, he conducted the band, too!

Anybody else from the same era, please help fill the gaps!!!

All the best,

Alex

alexdron
18th July 2018, 00:59
Some more cadet names...
Graham Hutchinson, BP, Stirling
Danjuma Sule, Nigeria
Adegboyeba Akanbi, Nigeria

Staff:
Can’t remember his name but we had a Mechanics lecturer who regularly wore a green, Glen check suit with a jumper tucked into the trousers. The tie, unbelievably, outside the jumper and also tucked into the trousers.
Actually a very good lecturer!

Derek Dunn
20th July 2018, 16:09
Some more cadet names...
Graham Hutchinson, BP, Stirling
Danjuma Sule, Nigeria
Adegboyeba Akanbi, Nigeria

Staff:
Can’t remember his name but we had a Mechanics lecturer who regularly wore a green, Glen check suit with a jumper tucked into the trousers. The tie, unbelievably, outside the jumper and also tucked into the trousers.
Actually a very good lecturer!

Alex, we (the class of '69), are having another get together in Glasgow next Thursday, would you like to come? I have John O'Hares number too.

alexdron
21st July 2018, 19:20
Alex, we (the class of '69), are having another get together in Glasgow next Thursday, would you like to come? I have John O'Hares number too.

Sorry Derek, I’ll be in Spain and unable to make it.

pelerous
27th July 2018, 13:59
Alistair Douglas
Alistair passed away yesterday 27th July 2018.
Details of arrangements will, I expect, be published in the Glasgow Herald.
Alistair joined the college, in 1957?, when it was part of the Glasgow Tech. It then moved to the Church at the corner of John St. and Martha St.
In 1968 the new building, now demolished and replaced, opened in Thistle St.
Alistair retired in 1995.
He will be missed by many.

pelerous
27th July 2018, 14:08
Correction
The above should read yesterday Thursday 26th July 2018.

Angus Murray
27th July 2018, 16:52
[quote=pelerous;2925005]Alistair Douglas
Alistair passed away yesterday 27th July 2018.
Details of arrangements will, I expect, be published in the Glasgow Herald.
Alistair joined the college, in 1957?, when it was part of the Glasgow Tech. It then moved to the Church at the corner of John St. and Martha St.
In 1968 the new building, now demolished and replaced, opened in Thistle St.
Alistair retired in 1995.
He will be missed by many.[/quote



Not only a very nice man but a great lecturer. Remember him well from my time at GCNS from 2nd Mates to Masters. Alistair made Ship Stability classes a pleasure to attend.

Stephen J. Card
27th July 2018, 20:15
1971 to 1979 at GCNS, Cadet to Master's. 1971 he was Warden at the Hillfoot Hall of Residence.. AKA Hillfoot Hilton!

Great lecturer and just a great, kind man and fine gentleman. I have all of my notes for Stability and his 'comments'. I must go back and look at them again. Some of the comments are real crackers.

I last saw him about 20 years ago. He was on holiday in Bermuda and it was such fantastic to see him here.

The thing is, all of these lecturers at GCNS were A1. Not just to get us through a few exams, they were there to get us through life, no matter what we might be doing. I spent about two and half years in the school. GCNS and Glasgow in general... great time.

Rest In Peace Alistair.

Stephen

Stephen J. Card
4th August 2018, 19:59
Any idea what company Alistair sailed with?

Stephen

pelerous
6th December 2018, 19:59
Any idea what company Alistair sailed with?

Stephen

Alfred Holt, then Donaldsons and then Buries Marks.

Buries Marks asked him to represent them at the Baltic exchange.

London was not for him and lucky for us he came to the college in Glasgow.

Brian Graham
6th December 2018, 21:50
While looking for info on the web for some college info I came accross this thread and noted with interest Alex Drons post of July 18.
I was also an Engineer Cadet in that first intake in 1968 and reckonise a few names on your list and can add one or two more,

Brian Graham - PSNC
Vic Groundwater - Ben Line
Derek (Dick) MacDonald - Ben Line
Adam Conn - Denholms
Tony Spoor - Shell
John Scott - BP
Andy Wylie - B&C
Colin Shaw
Ronnie Copland
Ronnie Simpson

Good to hear some of these names again

Stephen J. Card
6th December 2018, 23:59
Alfred Holt, then Donaldsons and then Buries Marks.

Buries Marks asked him to represent them at the Baltic exchange.

London was not for him and lucky for us he came to the college in Glasgow.


Thanks.

He was warden at Hillfoot Hostel 1971 ( Hillfoot Hilton!) and lecturer right up to 1979 for Class I. A real gentleman. I made a mistake to go to the London Polytechnic for Class 1. Lasted for three weeks. Their methods were not what we knew at GCNS so switched up to Glasgow.

Stephen

Derek Dunn
9th December 2018, 08:57
While looking for info on the web for some college info I came accross this thread and noted with interest Alex Drons post of July 18.
I was also an Engineer Cadet in that first intake in 1968 and reckonise a few names on your list and can add one or two more,

Brian Graham - PSNC
Vic Groundwater - Ben Line
Derek (Dick) MacDonald - Ben Line
Adam Conn - Denholms
Tony Spoor - Shell
John Scott - BP
Andy Wylie - B&C
Colin Shaw
Ronnie Copland
Ronnie Simpson

Good to hear some of these names again


Good morning Brian, I was second year intake at GCNS and worked for Ben Line. I sailed with Colin Shaw when he was 2nd and I was 3rd. As I did a reversed phase I met many of your year group when I was at Springburn 1971-1972. There was a PSNC cadet there but I can't remember if it was you or not. Cheers.

Brian Graham
9th December 2018, 09:43
Good morning Brian, I was second year intake at GCNS and worked for Ben Line. I sailed with Colin Shaw when he was 2nd and I was 3rd. As I did a reversed phase I met many of your year group when I was at Springburn 1971-1972. There was a PSNC cadet there but I can't remember if it was you or not. Cheers.

Good Morning Derek, I guess we must have passed each other in the corridors many times in the year we overlapped, no that wasn’t me at Springburn as I also did reverse phase and was there in 70-71. For a few years after we qualified I would bump into Colin if he was at his uncles hotel in Oban but lost track as I have of many from that era. Cheers.

Derek Dunn
9th December 2018, 11:01
Good Morning Derek, I guess we must have passed each other in the corridors many times in the year we overlapped, no that wasn’t me at Springburn as I also did reverse phase and was there in 70-71. For a few years after we qualified I would bump into Colin if he was at his uncles hotel in Oban but lost track as I have of many from that era. Cheers.

Morning Brian, yes we certainly must have passed each other in GCNS. I will put a couple of names to you: Paul Smith (Shell), Colin Hill (Salvesons), Jock Munro ( he was from Tranent and drove a van). There was a John somebody from Galashields who lived in the YMCA beside me, I think he might even have been Ben Line? Dave Andrews and Andy Fulton were at Springburn with me.

Brian Graham
9th December 2018, 14:56
Morning Brian, yes we certainly must have passed each other in GCNS. I will put a couple of names to you: Paul Smith (Shell), Colin Hill (Salvesons), Jock Munro ( he was from Tranent and drove a van). There was a John somebody from Galashields who lived in the YMCA beside me, I think he might even have been Ben Line? Dave Andrews and Andy Fulton were at Springburn with me.

We had a Shell Paul Smith in my class if I remember correctly known as Taff possibly, Andy Fulton also rings a bell. I was looking for a few old college photos earlier but it seem I have filed them away “somewhere safe”.

Derek Dunn
9th December 2018, 16:59
We had a Shell Paul Smith in my class if I remember correctly known as Taff possibly, Andy Fulton also rings a bell. I was looking for a few old college photos earlier but it seem I have filed them away “somewhere safe”.

Would be great to see them Brian.
What about John O'Hare from Callander? I sometimes speak to him.
Rab Fraser from Edinburgh, (Denhams).

Brian Graham
10th December 2018, 16:50
Would be great to see them Brian.
What about John O'Hare from Callander? I sometimes speak to him.
Rab Fraser from Edinburgh, (Denhams).

Rab Fraser is another familiar name, possibly Denholms was his second go as a cadet and for the non JJ cadets it gave us hope there might be a backup if our companies chucked us out.

ninabaker
14th December 2018, 23:13
Hi everyone on this thread,
I am working with the nautical college people on a display associated with next year's "Maritime 50" as they are calling their half-centenary celebrations of the founding of the nautical college.
As discussed above, it has recently been beautifully rebuilt and is now called the City of Glasgow College Riverside Campus.
The nautical and engineering departments have recently been merged.

They seem to have very nearly no archives to speak of and I am helping them piece together some of their history so if anyone here would be willing to share recollections of their time at the college, photos etc, that would be terrific.

In particular they would be keen to know names of female cadets (deck, engine or radio).
Also if anyone on here won any prize/s, the college only has lists for 1972-77 prize winners and there were at least a couple of dozen each year, judging by the lists of prize sponsors later on.

I have suggested someone from the college joins SN but in the first instance could you PM me and we can then take it to email.

Some of you may know me perhaps from when I established the now annual MN Memorial Day event at the city chambers. I am retired from the city council now and amusing myself with a lot of this sort of historical stuff.

Many thanks

Nina

Derek Dunn
15th December 2018, 13:46
Hi everyone on this thread,
I am working with the nautical college people on a display associated with next year's "Maritime 50" as they are calling their half-centenary celebrations of the founding of the nautical college.
As discussed above, it has recently been beautifully rebuilt and is now called the City of Glasgow College Riverside Campus.
The nautical and engineering departments have recently been merged.

They seem to have very nearly no archives to speak of and I am helping them piece together some of their history so if anyone here would be willing to share recollections of their time at the college, photos etc, that would be terrific.

In particular they would be keen to know names of female cadets (deck, engine or radio).
Also if anyone on here won any prize/s, the college only has lists for 1972-77 prize winners and there were at least a couple of dozen each year, judging by the lists of prize sponsors later on.

I have suggested someone from the college joins SN but in the first instance could you PM me and we can then take it to email.

Some of you may know me perhaps from when I established the now annual MN Memorial Day event at the city chambers. I am retired from the city council now and amusing myself with a lot of this sort of historical stuff.

Many thanks

Nina
Good afternoon Nina, about a dozen of us from intake year 1969 have been getting together in Glasgow for a "meet-up". We are planning to get as many of us from that year group together for a reunion in August. If you PM me I will give you a contact email address for the gentleman co-ordinating it.

Regards,
Derek.

pelerous
17th December 2018, 20:44
Next year is a bit late for a half-centenary celebration as the college opened on the 20th of August 1968.
That is forgetting the previous 50 years.
Captain Charles H Brown, author of several text books, was appointed superintendent of the Navigation Dept. in 1910 of what became the Royal College of Science and Technology and then the University of Strathclyde.
Glasgow Corporation took over in 1958 or 1959 when the Navigation Dept. moved across the road to an old church at the corner of Martha Street.
When the 'New College' opened in August 1968 the Navigation Dept was on the 6th 7th and 8th floors, the Radio Dept was below that and the Engineering Dept. on the lower floors.
For several weeks everyone was merrily using the lifts until some bright spark noticed
that there was no safety certificate and we had to walk up seven floors.
The Power Plant did not move from Springburn College for several years as the site was still occupied by tenements and a cork warehouse.
For several years there were no female staff or students, apart from three or four office girls, the only female toilet was along the corridor towards the principals office.
How did three or four office girls, without computers, manage all the work of the college! We live in an age of progress!
I believe in this half-centenary celebration, honour should be paid to the college hereos
Lt. Cdr. Harold Hinksman Brown RNR DSC (sinking a U-boat) Son of the college founder.
Lt. Cdr. Ian Pearson RNR DSC and Bar and five times mentioned in dispatches.

George Bis
17th December 2018, 23:15
I first started in the 2nd.Mates class in Nov. 1970 and the whole surrounding area was being demolished for rebuilding. As streets came down the last buildings left standing were the pubs which carried on serving even when the rest of the street had gone! Can't remember where the Clelland fitted into this.

John Cassels
18th December 2018, 18:38
Up for Masters early 1973 , one of the lads ( union castle ) I think had the very first electronic calculator the rest of us had ever seen. Cost him a fortune , could only add , subtract , multiply and divide but to us it was a miracle . Even Capt.Callender was impressed.

Stephen J. Card
18th December 2018, 19:51
Up for Masters early 1973 , one of the lads ( union castle ) I think had the very first electronic calculator the rest of us had ever seen. Cost him a fortune , could only add , subtract , multiply and divide but to us it was a miracle . Even Capt.Callender was impressed.


Five years later... you could use a calculator, BUT you had to show all of the working on the work sheets or go zero marks. I would guess you could still loose 50% of the mark and gain a big red 'P'!!!

NZSCOTTY
18th December 2018, 21:21
Five years later... you could use a calculator, BUT you had to show all of the working on the work sheets or go zero marks. I would guess you could still loose 50% of the mark and gain a big red 'P'!!!

Pity they were ever invented as the modern youth can't count without them. Bring back the "times tables" in schools! (2x2=4 etc)!

Ron Stringer
18th December 2018, 21:52
Pity they were ever invented as the modern youth can't count without them. Bring back the "times tables" in schools! (2x2=4 etc)!

Don't get the logic behind that. Can you recall all your log tables or work out your sights by remembering your Nories tables?

NZSCOTTY
18th December 2018, 22:02
My logic was based on a light hearted view however try getting a lad or lass behind the counter in a shop when you have mentally added up the price while they are still counting via their calculator.

Ron Stringer
19th December 2018, 13:44
My logic was based on a light hearted view however try getting a lad or lass behind the counter in a shop when you have mentally added up the price while they are still counting via their calculator.

My response was light-hearted too - but all these things are relative. You have a skill that they don't have but you still can't recall things that some other people can. Those kids can probably quote you every tune recorded by their latest on-line idol, of whose existence you aren't even aware.

Maybe not important to you and I but essential if you are to move in their social circles.

I too am of an age where multiplication tables had to be learned and recited, where a session of mental arithmetic started every school day (immediately following morning assembly). In an instant I could tell you the price of a dozen eggs if one cost three farthings. In our youth and early adulthood, such skills proved very helpful. But today I am no more able to shop than the lad or lass behind the checkout. Like my ability to send and receive morse code by telegraph or radio, my ability to repair radios and radar equipment which used vacuum tube technology, hard-won skills are frequently by-passed by developments in technology and made redundant.

It isn't my fault that the world moved on and made my skills of only academic interest and I would be displeased with someone who considered me inadequate as a consequence.

So while I'm pleased that I can work out the shop prices quicker than the girl behind the till, I don't consider her to be lacking in any way. It would not help her to do her job (or live her life) better if she were to make the effort needed to learn those old skills. Let her get on with things her way while I try to figure out how to remove an unwanted caller from WhatsApp. (I should ask the girl on the counter how to do that - not a problem to her).

frangio
19th December 2018, 16:32
I can assure you that children do still learn their times tables. In fact many parents will tell you they can't do the maths homework that their children get. My 9yo Grandson is brilliant at mental arithmetic but I know many of my generation that just can't do it. And when you get onto percentages I find a huge proportion of the population can't get their heads round them.

I agree that for some reason many shop assistants can't work out the change and it is quite amazing the reaction when you give them some change along with notes and it dons on them that you did this to get larger coins in change. Can't see why times tables would help with that anyway as it just simple adding and subtraction.

It was on the radio this morning that we are morphing into a cashless society with the growth in contactless paying so there soon won't be any need. As people no longer have to use mental arithmetic the skill, even if learned at school, will atrophy. Like many other things - use it or lose it!

NZSCOTTY
19th December 2018, 17:47
Up for Masters early 1973 , one of the lads ( union castle ) I think had the very first electronic calculator the rest of us had ever seen. Cost him a fortune , could only add , subtract , multiply and divide but to us it was a miracle . Even Capt.Callender was impressed.

My apologies to you John for making a light hearted remark about a calculator which has brought on a stream of defence and comment on the youth of today.
Still have fond memories of the Glasgow Nautical college and Friday afternoon over at the pub.

John Cassels
19th December 2018, 18:33
No apologies necessary John , anyhow I agree with your view.

George Bis
20th December 2018, 14:59
This is changing the subject slightly, I wondered if anyone knows how many candidates attended the GCNS at any one time?
Also I wondered if anyone knows how many people are employed in the British Merchant navy.? In my day I remember seeing a figure of 1000,000 but I have no idea how accurate that was.

ninabaker
14th January 2019, 10:52
Hi all,
Me again. The college is asking if anyone has any class photos they would be willing to share. It seems the college either didnt take them or didnt keep them. They have scarcely any archives.
Please message me with email address to take this further

thanks
nina