My first Bluey

DURANGO
18th September 2014, 20:16
My first encounter with the Blue Funnel line was back in 1959 when I was in Liverpool as a boy rating in the Wellington Star I was very impressed by there lines powerful majestic ships , the next time that I can remember was in 1962 when I was put ashore sick in Shanghai and from my hospital window on the first floor I could see the ships I could be wrong but I seem to remember seeing AH on one of the shed roofs there are those on this site who will know and who will be able to put me right I,m sure .
The one thing I know is that I had a taste of the far east and I wanted to get back but being from London it was difficult to pick up a ship trading out east ,so when I got back to the UK I contacted the Blue Funnel line it took me a couple of letters to Mr Greenwood have I got the right name again I reckon I,ll be put right there if I,m wrong but then again we are talking 52 years ago so I reckon I,m allowed to forget a few names on my first attempt I got a letter back telling me that there where no position's available for an AB so back to the pool next leave I wrote to Liverpool again this time a letter back telling me to come to Birkenhead to join Agapenor I well remember walking aboard with my gear and standing on deck looking up at that Blue funnel I still remember saying to myself I,m on a Blue Funnel ship off to Java great voyage and a great crew little Edgar Owen my cabin mate a wonderful tough little welsh man I was in 4 blueys all good trips but I have to say the Agapenor was my favourite how wonderful to have experienced those long gone times best regards to all hands .

Hugh Ferguson
19th September 2014, 07:57
Here's a photo of a maiden voyage Agapenor-Aug.1947-sailing from Birkenhead. I was on the bridge, a brand new 4th mate with a brand new 2nd mate's certificate.
Captain Longair and Mr Punchard C/O. We were off to Japan.

Pat Kennedy
19th September 2014, 09:05
My first encounter with the Blue Funnel line was back in 1959 when I was in Liverpool as a boy rating in the Wellington Star I was very impressed by there lines powerful majestic ships , the next time that I can remember was in 1962 when I was put ashore sick in Shanghai and from my hospital window on the first floor I could see the ships I could be wrong but I seem to remember seeing AH on one of the shed roofs there are those on this site who will know and who will be able to put me right I,m sure .
The one thing I know is that I had a taste of the far east and I wanted to get back but being from London it was difficult to pick up a ship trading out east ,so when I got back to the UK I contacted the Blue Funnel line it took me a couple of letters to Mr Greenwood have I got the right name again I reckon I,ll be put right there if I,m wrong but then again we are talking 52 years ago so I reckon I,m allowed to forget a few names on my first attempt I got a letter back telling me that there where no position's available for an AB so back to the pool next leave I wrote to Liverpool again this time a letter back telling me to come to Birkenhead to join Agapenor I well remember walking aboard with my gear and standing on deck looking up at that Blue funnel I still remember saying to myself I,m on a Blue Funnel ship off to Java great voyage and a great crew little Edgar Owen my cabin mate a wonderful tough little welsh man I was in 4 blueys all good trips but I have to say the Agapenor was my favourite how wonderful to have experienced those long gone times best regards to all hands .

Your memory is spot on, there was a AH on the shed roof in Shanghai, Holts had their little empire there for many years.
As for Mr Greenwood, yes he was the main man in Odyssey Works in Birkenhead, responsible for selecting and allocating the deck crews.
He was an ex radio officer who hailed from Garstang in Lancashire, perhaps you can remember his strong Lancashire accent.
He was a kindly man who would do his best to accomodate your wishes in regard to which run you preferred and so on, he once allowed me to sail home trade for a year while my father was ill, and even got me into the shore gang for a few months for the same reason. There were not many like him around.
As for the Agapenor, I was coasting in her 25/5/62 until 26/6/62, as AB. Joined in London and took her to Hamburg, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Antwerp, Avonmouth, Glasgow, Birkenhead.
Edgar Owen I remember, but he was on the Memnon when I sailed with him, in 1960. As you say, a tough little character, and a true Blue Funnel 'stanchion'.
Best Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

Hugh Ferguson
19th September 2014, 17:25
We finished discharging our outward cargo in Shanghai and I vividly remember a very long steel girder coming out of No.5 lower hold.
It was so long that I still have the impression that it extended into No.4 lower hold but surely that cannot be possible! Please enlighten.

Whatever, out it came and was landed on the wharf with, apparently, no means of shifting it-probably weighed about ten tons.
We didn't have long to wait, for 'round the go-down trotted about a hundred coolies each carrying a bamboo rod and a coil of rope.
They quickly aligned all hands on either side of the girder, passing the end of their rope under the girder to their opposite number and, taking a turn around their respective bambee rods, did a test lift with the accompaniment of much vocalising.
Having got an equal load on each and every shoulder up came the girder as if it weighed a feather and, with much more vocalising, they gathered speed, to such an extent, that by the time they were disappearing around the side of the go-down I swear they were going at a slow trot.

Those were the days to be going to sea: I'd get bored stiff nowadays in a container ship-no colour, no romance.

China hand
19th September 2014, 19:00
Ah Hugh, the way you describe it, I can almost see it in front of me. Thanks a lot.(Thumb)

DURANGO
19th September 2014, 20:26
Yes Pat a very nice man as you say not to many Mr Greenwoods about now days, regarding Edgar a lovely man great ship mate I heard he crossed the bar some years ago a Blue funnel stanchion I reckon that just about describes him one of the toughest men I have ever met with a real nice nature he was always up for a laugh , you describe Shanghai wonderfully Hugh as they used to say give a China man a bamboo.pole and he could carry the world think about it they where always rushing about carrying heavy loads on there shoulders such wonderful times thanks for the great photo of the old girl Hugh, oh to just do one more trick on the wheel through those Indonesian islands regards Dave .

DURANGO
20th September 2014, 06:52
I must have joined her for the deep sea voyage as you paid off from the home trade Pat regards Dave .

Hugh Ferguson
20th September 2014, 08:27
Lovely to have a bit of nostalgia shining through after all this natonalistic stuff that I don't much care for!
m.v. Agapenor was a Clyde built ship with a Scots captain, a Scots 2nd mate a half Scots 4th mate and a Liverpool 3rd mate, and without question some more Scots in the engine room.

We never gave a thought to where we happened to have been born-in my case Winchester-and it never, that I recall, was ever an issue in any of our ship-board dealings.

Hugh Ferguson
20th September 2014, 11:29
After that dream voyage in the maiden voyage Agapenor as a 4th mate watch keeper I went 3rd mate of the 1917 year built s.s. Elpenor for no less than three voyages; the first of which took us to Shanghai.
You younger fellows could not begin to imagine how different life was aboard an old, slow, coal-burner compared to that aboard a modern motor ship.
Steam reciprocating winches that vibrated through the whole ship and if you had one near your cabin-as most did-you sure knew it!
And as for taking bunkers in a place like Aden the less remembered the better.

See HERE (www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/243187/title/glenfinlas-1946/cat/500)

TABNAB
20th September 2014, 14:12
Your memory is spot on, there was a AH on the shed roof in Shanghai, Holts had their little empire there for many years.
As for Mr Greenwood, yes he was the main man in Odyssey Works in Birkenhead, responsible for selecting and allocating the deck crews.
He was an ex radio officer who hailed from Garstang in Lancashire, perhaps you can remember his strong Lancashire accent.
He was a kindly man who would do his best to accomodate your wishes in regard to which run you preferred and so on, he once allowed me to sail home trade for a year while my father was ill, and even got me into the shore gang for a few months for the same reason. There were not many like him around.
As for the Agapenor, I was coasting in her 25/5/62 until 26/6/62, as AB. Joined in London and took her to Hamburg, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Antwerp, Avonmouth, Glasgow, Birkenhead.
Edgar Owen I remember, but he was on the Memnon when I sailed with him, in 1960. As you say, a tough little character, and a true Blue Funnel 'stanchion'.
Best Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

In the late 1950's I remember visiting the Mariners' Club in Shanghai, formerly the famous expat "Shanghai Club", where the carpets had the Ocean Steamships Co logo woven into the design. Apparently it had been liberated from AH warehouse. RGDS TABNAB

Pat Kennedy
20th September 2014, 20:26
We finished discharging our outward cargo in Shanghai and I vividly remember a very long steel girder coming out of No.5 lower hold.
It was so long that I still have the impression that it extended into No.4 lower hold but surely that cannot be possible! Please enlighten.

Whatever, out it came and was landed on the wharf with, apparently, no means of shifting it-probably weighed about ten tons.
We didn't have long to wait, for 'round the go-down trotted about a hundred coolies each carrying a bamboo rod and a coil of rope.
They quickly aligned all hands on either side of the girder, passing the end of their rope under the girder to their opposite number and, taking a turn around their respective bambee rods, did a test lift with the accompaniment of much vocalising.
Having got an equal load on each and every shoulder up came the girder as if it weighed a feather and, with much more vocalising, they gathered speed, to such an extent, that by the time they were disappearing around the side of the go-down I swear they were going at a slow trot.

Those were the days to be going to sea: I'd get bored stiff nowadays in a container ship-no colour, no romance.

Hugh,
Birkenhead stevedores could do some wonderful things with stowage. I have often seen hundreds of long steel girders loaded into the lower hold and be finished off as a perfectly smooth and level 'dance floor' with no gaps.
One 'H' class loaded in Liverpool, a very large launch was stowed in #2 upper tween deck per floating crane and a couple of bull wires with strategically placed snatch blocks.
It sat snug in the tween deck all the way to Sydney.
When the Aussie wharfies came to discharge it, they couldnt figure out how the hell the poms had got it int the tween deck and eventually had to get a burner with a gas axe to remove a steel column so they could get it out.

As to a steel girder longer than the lower hold, maybe it was stowed on a port to starboard angle and posibly canted upward as well.

Here is a photo from the SN gallery courtesy of Plainsman, of long steel being loaded by quayside crane into #4 hatch on Harrison's Administrator in Birkenhead
Its possible I was actually driving the crane in this picture, as it was my regular crane for a while

DURANGO
20th September 2014, 20:50
I to had very few problems at sea and I sailed with lads from all corners of the UK and in many ships I was the only Londoner on deck in fact when I was with Blue Funnel from what I remember when I was in the Pyrrhus apart from me and a pal who joined her with me there was the bosun known as the Gaul I think he may have been also from London , Antilochus ,Agapenor , Perseus , I was the only one although I did have a run in with my watch mate aboard Perseus he was a big lump. who wanted to give me a hard time through out the voyage but I wasn't having it I always thought he was gutless and put him straight a few times lucky for me he never got round to clumping me there was no way I would have been able to handle him mind you come to think of it I bought a cockatoo parrot in Singapore (somewhere I have some photos I will try to dig them out and post them ) I was walking through the working alleyway with 2 thick glasses that I put it,s food and water in I had just cleaned them in our bathroom as I,m walking back to my cabin who comes walking towards me but none other than the lump as we all know we had to give way to each other as we passed or we would collided anyhow I had had a dose of him before and this time I thought he never gives way so I won't well of course we collides this really made him angry so he grabs me round the neck all I could think of was that apart from throttling me he was going to break my 2 glasses so I well remember shouting out to him mind me glasses which straight away took me back in my mind to when I was at school when we where kids and the one who wore glasses took them off before they got into a punch up so when that thought came to my mind I started to laugh which really gave him the hump but lucky for me he left it at that and after that we just tolerated each other but to be fair I spent 12 years at sea and only 1 run in I don't think that was to bad and if he read this he will know who he is but I have no hard feelings in fact I wish him well ,blimey I went on there but it happened ,Tab Nab you mention the seamen's club in Shanghai I spent best part of a week there back in 1962 waiting to be sent to Hong Kong they eventually put me on a train in fact I still have those train tickets I often look at them they take me back to when I was no more than a boy I was only just 19 in fact I spent Chinese new year in hospital there is a story about that but that is for another time regards to all hands .

Pat Kennedy
20th September 2014, 21:10
[quote=DURANGO;1062417]I to had very few problems at sea and I sailed with lads from all corners of the UK and in many ships I was the only Londoner on deck in fact when I was with Blue Funnel from what I remember when I was in the Pyrrhus apart from me and a pal who joined her with me there was the bosun known as the Gaul I think he may have been also from London ,

I believe the bosun you mention was 'The Ghoul' whose real name, if I ever knew it, I have forgotten. He always wore black leather gloves, and would prowl the decks during the night. A strange man, he once had a small part in a film which featured a Blue Funnel ship, I think it was the Bellerophon, whose name was shortened to 'Belle' for the filming. The Ghoul played the gangwayman in one short sequence. The film was called, 'The Sailor who fell from Grace with the Sea, and starred Kris Kristofferson and Sarah Miles.
Best Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

DURANGO
21st September 2014, 10:22
Thanks for that Pat I always found the bosun to be a decent man who was a very competant seaman I will try to find a copy of that film best regards

richardwakeley
21st September 2014, 11:24
Hugh,
From my dim distant memory of making cargo plans, I think the upper tween deck in no.4 or No.5 in A-boats extended under the mast house. I will look it up on the drawing in 'Voyage East' next time I'm home.
Brgds,
Richard

Hugh Ferguson
22nd September 2014, 14:00
Here's a bit of pure nostalgia to tweak the equivalent of taste buds but relating to smell: no that doesn't sound right, maybe "aroma", "odour", "fragrance". No, none of those sounds right: where's my Roget's Thesaurus ?www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=15759#9

DURANGO
22nd September 2014, 16:06
The smells aboard where truly wonderful out east as you well know Hugh the thought takes me back to having to batten down and secure ship especially when we had hatchboards and tarps and what a mess the decks where wires all over the place clusters to be stowed derricks and guys in all sorts of positions that had to be sorted lowered and secured, this always went down well if we had just got back aboard from a run ashore from what I can remember the saying used to be iv,e got a head like birkenhead, us lot laying about waiting for the bosun to call us to get it sorted as we where getting ready to put to sea mind you once we got stuck in it all soon started to come together then it was the call for stations and if you where really unlucky you copped the leaving wheel as I did on many occasions ,I well remember on a Royal Mail ship down the west coast of South America we where leaving Callao and my cabin mate was adrift the bosun sent me ashore to find him I goes into a bar and there he is as drunk as a skunk mopping out the bar in bare feet so i drags him back to the ship he missed battening down and stations which really cheered the rest of the lads up I had missed battening down looking for him , then to top it off he was my watch mate as well ,I was first wheel leaving he was farmer it ended up our other watch mate doing 4 hours on look out and me doing 4 hours on the wheel and then I had to ask the mate of the watch if I could slip down to the loo he took the wheel while I shot down and called the next watch or else I might still have been there when I finally got releived and got back to my cabin he was sleeping like as baby and the lucky git got away with it .

Hugh Ferguson
22nd September 2014, 16:53
The smells aboard where truly wonderful out east as you well know Hugh the thought takes me back to having to batten down and secure ship especially when we had hatchboards and tarps and what a mess the decks where wires all over the place clusters to be stowed derricks and guys in all sorts of positions that had to be sorted lowered and secured, this always went down well if we had just got back aboard from a run ashore from what I can remember the saying used to be iv,e got a head like birkenhead, us lot laying about waiting for the bosun to call us to get it sorted as we where getting ready to put to sea mind you once we got stuck in it all soon started to come together then it was the call for stations and if you where really unlucky you copped the leaving wheel as I did on many occasions ,I well remember on a Royal Mail ship down the west coast of South America we where leaving Callao and my cabin mate was adrift the bosun sent me ashore to find him I goes into a bar and there he is as drunk as a skunk mopping out the bar in bare feet so i drags him back to the ship he missed battening down and stations which really cheered the rest of the lads up I had missed battening down looking for him , then to top it off he was my watch mate as well ,I was first wheel leaving he was farmer it ended up our other watch mate doing 4 hours on look out and me doing 4 hours on the wheel and then I had to ask the mate of the watch if I could slip down to the loo he took the wheel while I shot down and called the next watch or else I might still have been there when I finally got relieved and got back to my cabin he was sleeping like as baby and the lucky git got away with it .

Reminds me of a pretty tough character, Bill Brabner?, who didn't get his fingers out quick enough as a derrick dropped into its crutch.
He was so determined not to miss sailing from Singapore that he jumped hospital, leaving one of his fingers behind! He was a typical Liverpool/Birkenhead seaman.

DURANGO
22nd September 2014, 18:12
Oh yes Hugh it was very strict health and safety in those long gone days in fact could you imagine a health and safety chap walking around with derricks flying all over the place and us lot in boots and shorts and if we were lucky we might have a pair of gloves he would have had a heart attack just a thought I remember again this was when I was in Agapenor some of the lads had clusters over the side when we where working cargo at anchor in Java and they where catching sea snakes , I well remember the male nurse saying " I don't know if those snakes are poisonous because if they are and someone gets bitten I won't be able to do anything golden days indeed regards to all hands

Pat Kennedy
22nd September 2014, 18:41
Reminds me of a pretty tough character, Bill Brabner?, who didn't get his fingers out quick enough as a derrick dropped into its crutch.
He was so determined not to miss sailing from Singapore that he jumped hospital, leaving one of his fingers behind! He was a typical Liverpool/Birkenhead seaman.

That would be Mick Brabander, Hugh
He was a good bosun.(Thumb)

Hugh Ferguson
22nd September 2014, 19:34
He was an A.B., Pat, when I knew him and I can remember him well having gone several voyages, one as a middy and then as a 3rd mate in the old coal-burning Elpenor previously Glenfinlas c.1946 and again in 1949 (yes, a white crowd in a Glen boat!).
Jimmy Newall was another name I remember.
I've got some copies of old Articles stashed away some-place, I'll see if I can come up with some more names which maybe familiar to you.

Pat Kennedy
22nd September 2014, 21:20
He was an A.B., Pat, when I knew him and I can remember him well having gone several voyages, one as a middy and then as a 3rd mate in the old coal-burning Elpenor previously Glenfinlas c.1946 and again in 1949 (yes, a white crowd in a Glen boat!).
Jimmy Newall was another name I remember.
I've got some copies of old Articles stashed away some-place, I'll see if I can come up with some more names which maybe familiar to you.

Hugh,
Mick Brabander was very highly thought of in Blue Funnel.
When the company opened the deck boy training school at Odyssey Works, around 1957, Mick became the first bosun instructer.
However, the call of the sea was too strong and he shipped out again in mid 1958 and the bosun instructer's post was taken over by the legendary Denis O'Brien.
I sailed with Mick on a couple of ships coasting and he was, as I said a good bosun.
I also sailed with his nephew Peter Brabander who was AB in the company and who was cut out of the same cloth.

There is an extremely interesting and informative sarticle about the training school at this link;

http://www.rhiw.com/y_mor/blue_funnel_02/training_school.htm

Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

DURANGO
22nd September 2014, 22:26
Pat the Mr Greenwood in the article would that be the same man who I wrote to applying for a position as AB within the company when I was on the pool regards ,Dave

Mickdunn
23rd September 2014, 06:34
My first encounter with the Blue Funnel line was back in 1959 when I was in Liverpool as a boy rating in the Wellington Star I was very impressed by there lines powerful majestic ships , the next time that I can remember was in 1962 when I was put ashore sick in Shanghai and from my hospital window on the first floor I could see the ships I could be wrong but I seem to remember seeing AH on one of the shed roofs there are those on this site who will know and who will be able to put me right I,m sure .
The one thing I know is that I had a taste of the far east and I wanted to get back but being from London it was difficult to pick up a ship trading out east ,so when I got back to the UK I contacted the Blue Funnel line it took me a couple of letters to Mr Greenwood have I got the right name again I reckon I,ll be put right there if I,m wrong but then again we are talking 52 years ago so I reckon I,m allowed to forget a few names on my first attempt I got a letter back telling me that there where no position's available for an AB so back to the pool next leave I wrote to Liverpool again this time a letter back telling me to come to Birkenhead to join Agapenor I well remember walking aboard with my gear and standing on deck looking up at that Blue funnel I still remember saying to myself I,m on a Blue Funnel ship off to Java great voyage and a great crew little Edgar Owen my cabin mate a wonderful tough little welsh man I was in 4 blueys all good trips but I have to say the Agapenor was my favourite how wonderful to have experienced those long gone times best regards to all hands .

G'day boys couple of bosuns you mention I knew but didn't sail with.
Except one M brabander i am sure wasn't it his stepson or relative who dropped the Derrick on his fingers? We heard the hard sod chased him around the deck before he went to the doc.
When I joined blueys deck school Denis O'Brien was the bosun instructor for the six weeks I was there a great man.when he took us for lifeboat drill in the dock he told us we were going to the other side of a bridge no way we could get under,so he told us pull the drain plug from the boat we got under with half a boat full of water!!!! And soaking legs. Mr Greenwood did me a favour by getting me a berth on the Neleus bound for Aussie so I could bring two tea chests out for my brother who had just emigrated plus saving him a fortune in shipping cost another good man.
Cheers DUNNY .

Pat Kennedy
23rd September 2014, 09:05
Pat the Mr Greenwood in the article would that be the same man who I wrote to applying for a position as AB within the company when I was on the pool regards ,Dave

Yes Dave, it was the same Mr Greenwood, a heavily built chap with silvery hair, he had a stern look about him, but was a really kind hearted bloke.
I once had a fall on the Automedon in Hamburg and was landed into the Hafenkrankenhause in St Pauli. Mr Greenwood called at my home in Wallasey that same evening to reassure my parents that I was ok and would be home in a few days.
He was a genuinely good sort.
Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

Pat Kennedy
23rd September 2014, 09:14
G'day boys couple of bosuns you mention I knew but didn't sail with.
Except one M brabander i am sure wasn't it his stepson or relative who dropped the Derrick on his fingers? We heard the hard sod chased him around the deck before he went to the doc.
When I joined blueys deck school Denis O'Brien was the bosun instructor for the six weeks I was there a great man.when he took us for lifeboat drill in the dock he told us we were going to the other side of a bridge no way we could get under,so he told us pull the drain plug from the boat we got under with half a boat full of water!!!! And soaking legs. Mr Greenwood did me a favour by getting me a berth on the Neleus bound for Aussie so I could bring two tea chests out for my brother who had just emigrated plus saving him a fortune in shipping cost another good man.
Cheers DUNNY .

Dunny,
That Denis O'Brien knew a thing or two about lifeboats.
He was six days in an open boat after the Anchises was bombed and sunk in the Atlantic.
Here is an excerpt from the citation when he was awarded the British Empire Medal for his bravery.


For his conduct in taking charge of an open boat for six days:
O'Brien, Denis John - Able Seaman, BEM (CIV)
Citation for Denis John O'Brien:
"The ship was hit by bombs and had to be abandoned. Boats were lowered and ordered to lie to their sea anchors.

'One of the boats became separated from the rest, and was at sea for six days in heavy weather. On the second day the officer in charge died and Able Seaman O'Brien found himself senior survivor. He sailed and organised the boat until rescued, showing courage, seamanship and resource throughout.'

Ungazetted award by Lloyd's
O'Brien, Denis John - Able Seaman Lloyd's Bravery Medal.

Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

Hugh Ferguson
23rd September 2014, 09:22
Oh yes Hugh it was very strict health and safety in those long gone days in fact could you imagine a health and safety chap walking around with derricks flying all over the place and us lot in boots and shorts and if we were lucky we might have a pair of gloves he would have had a heart attack just a thought I remember again this was when I was in Agapenor some of the lads had clusters over the side when we where working cargo at anchor in Java and they where catching sea snakes , I well remember the male nurse saying " I don't know if those snakes are poisonous because if they are and someone gets bitten I won't be able to do anything golden days indeed regards to all hands

Not a hard hat in sight! I love this photo; the best I ever took. (m.v.Stentor, homeward Jan.1947, two days out of Singapore.)

DURANGO
23rd September 2014, 09:52
I found him to be a pleasant man Pat the sort who had the welfare of the men foremost in his mind , I remember going into the Birkenhead office and I believe if my memory serves there was a blue funnel imprinted in the floor of the main entrance and wasn't his office on the left as you walked in and why this comes to mind i dont know I think I was checked over by the doctor in a room to the right I believe again we are going back to close onto 50 years since I was last there so forgive me if I,m of course in any way best regards Dave .

Pat Kennedy
23rd September 2014, 10:08
I found him to be a pleasant man Pat the sort who had the welfare of the men foremost in his mind , I remember going into the Birkenhead office and I believe if my memory serves there was a blue funnel imprinted in the floor of the main entrance and wasn't his office on the left as you walked in and why this comes to mind i dont know I think I was checked over by the doctor in a room to the right I believe again we are going back to close onto 50 years since I was last there so forgive me if I,m of course in any way best regards Dave .

Quite correct Dave. You entered the building through an imposing double doorway , up a few steps into a waiting area with an ornate AH design on the floor, I seem to recall it was a large compass rose. Mr Greenwood's office was to the left and the doctor's office/examination room to the right. This was where any pre voyage innoculations were dispensed.
Further along the corridor was the catering superintendant's office. His name was Mr Sparrow and he dealt with crewing for the catering side.
In 1980, long after my seagoing career was over, I got a job with a company who had office space in Odyssey Works. Blue Funnel was long gone although some of the janitorial staff were still employed there.
I found myself working in an office on the same corridor, and walked over the AH floor design every day for a couple of years. A strange feeling.
Ive attached a photo which may bring memories into focus Dave, the doorway in question is the one by the grey bin.
Best Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

Mickdunn
23rd September 2014, 11:09
Hugh,
Birkenhead stevedores could do some wonderful things with stowage. I have often seen hundreds of long steel girders loaded into the lower hold and be finished off as a perfectly smooth and level 'dance floor' with no gaps.
One 'H' class loaded in Liverpool, a very large launch was stowed in #2 upper tween deck per floating crane and a couple of bull wires with strategically placed snatch blocks.
It sat snug in the tween deck all the way to Sydney.
When the Aussie wharfies came to discharge it, they couldnt figure out how the hell the poms had got it int the tween deck and eventually had to get a burner with a gas axe to remove a steel column so they could get it out.

As to a steel girder longer than the lower hold, maybe it was stowed on a port to starboard angle and posibly canted upward as well.

Here is a photo from the SN gallery courtesy of Plainsman, of long steel being loaded by quayside crane into #4 hatch on Harrison's Administrator in Birkenhead
Its possible I was actually driving the crane in this picture, as it was my regular crane for a while
Pat you must have loaded steel or steel pipes longer than the hatch that just fitted down below.I know I have,you had a long chain one end and a short one the other with pieces of dunnage in between sling and pipe,crude and dangerous but it worked!
I did hit the edge of the hatch one night in the dark and the pipe shot down the ships alley way and scattered all hands having a smoke.
I never heard the last of that one.

Pat Kennedy
23rd September 2014, 12:10
Pat you must have loaded steel or steel pipes longer than the hatch that just fitted down below.I know I have,you had a long chain one end and a short one the other with pieces of dunnage in between sling and pipe,crude and dangerous but it worked!
I did hit the edge of the hatch one night in the dark and the pipe shot down the ships alley way and scattered all hands having a smoke.
I never heard the last of that one.

Yes Mick, many a time picked up long steel or pipes slung at a precarious angle, but always managed to get them down the hatch safely.
It was odd though that every time we loaded board slings of cases of whisky, at least one sling would manage to strike the tween deck coaming and spill a case or two out!
Do you remember the shouts of 'Paddy Kelly' whenever the dock police were spotted approaching the ship?
Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

makko
23rd September 2014, 13:55
Oddy Works - Pat, the small building on the right, wasn't that the canteen? When I was there, Daggy was on the second floor and the third floor had been the radar school. We had tech lectures from Daggy on a Tuesday night. He always made sure that they ran late enough for us to have to make a mad dash to the pub before last orders!

I assume Pat that you worked in the loft where they did liferafts etc. It was rented out and I cannot remember the name of the company. Between the workshop and that building, cadets were employed "sectioning" and old steam engine which was to be displayed. I managed to escape to Nestor up in Loch Striven!
Rgds.
Dave

Pat Kennedy
23rd September 2014, 16:40
Oddy Works - Pat, the small building on the right, wasn't that the canteen? When I was there, Daggy was on the second floor and the third floor had been the radar school. We had tech lectures from Daggy on a Tuesday night. He always made sure that they ran late enough for us to have to make a mad dash to the pub before last orders!

I assume Pat that you worked in the loft where they did liferafts etc. It was rented out and I cannot remember the name of the company. Between the workshop and that building, cadets were employed "sectioning" and old steam engine which was to be displayed. I managed to escape to Nestor up in Loch Striven!
Rgds.
Dave

Dave, I think the building with the radar antennas on the roof was to the left of the rigging loft. That building did have engineering classrooms as well as deck training rooms.
Ive attached a view of that building.
The one I worked in, in the 1980s was in the same building as Mr Greenwood's office. It was for a company called Mareguard International, a subsidiary of Sabre Safety, a firm which manufactures compressed air breathing apparatus at a large factory in Ash, Hants.
Mareguard supplied this equipment to the marine industry, including Blue Funnel.
I was employed, after suitable training,( sitting next to a gorgeous blonde in the factory for a month), as a service engineer, and enjoyed a couple of years, based in Odyssey Works, travelling to ships all over the UK and Northern Europe, servicing the on board safety equipment.
A nice job until the a*** fell out of shipping in 1983
Best Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

makko
23rd September 2014, 17:25
Yes, thats it Pat. There was access to a benchwork workshop located above the main workshop and the classroom above. In the workshop on the right hand side going in was the mankiest lathe on earth which you had to use to make test pieces with very strict tolerances. All the tools were clapped out too but the idea was that you were onboard ship and had no other resources but those at hand.
Rgds.
Dave

tom roberts
23rd September 2014, 19:37
Not a hard hat in sight! I love this photo; the best I ever took. (m.v.Stentor, homeward Jan.1947, two days out of Singapore.)

Hugh Re the photo you took of the two deck crew on the Stentor,the man on the right is Doug Jardine, he was my wifes ex father in law Doug worked in the riggingloft at Odessey works.Do any other ex Blueys remember him .Dougs son, another Doug went down below as he was colour blind, he did a few trips on the Bowater boats,sadly he passed away earlier this year.

Farmer John
23rd September 2014, 22:21
I have been trawling BF sites quite heavily today after checking the cattle and other things. There are lists of A class, D class, M class and Super Ps, but where does a ship like the Glenogle fit in? M class, I sailed on Menestheus, I remember her well, but the Glenogle had a bulbous bow and other things. Being picky, but what class was she? Lovely to do a trip on, I must have done later trips than I thought, I "missed" the Melampus on her lock in trip when BR lost my luggage (and looted it, the bastards), then did the Glenogle trip, we saw the Priam Super P on her maiden voyage ( I have a photo somewhere, must dig it out), then that was it for me.

makko
23rd September 2014, 22:39
John,
The Super P's were my favourites as a boy. However, it was quite something for this first tripper crossing Biscay! They woul roll in a photograph! My Dad sailed on both D's and M's and during his time at Odyssey Works probably worked on every existent class (early 50's). Anyone remeber old Pops Blakemore at Odyssey - He stopped me on my first day and told me he had sailed with my Grandfather in the war (who eventually ended up in Milag Nord).
Rgds.
Dave

bfraser47
24th September 2014, 06:56
[QUOTE=Farmer John;1067873]I have been trawling BF sites quite heavily today , but where does a ship like the Glenogle fit in? the Glenogle had a bulbous bow and other things. Being picky, but what class was she? Lovely to do a trip
Morning John
Glenogle, Glenlyon, Flintshire and one other I can't remember. Four beautiful ships, and you're right, lovely to do a trip. I did about 6 on Glenogle, regular as clockwork out of KGV via Capetown to Penang, coasting all around far east and back via Trinco and Colombo. Three months trip, one month leave while she coasted around UK then back for another pleasure cruise. Classic ships, great crews and amazing runs. Oh that I could turn back the clock

bfraser47
24th September 2014, 07:17
John
Further to mine #38, think the 4th Glen boat was Glenfalloch
Cheers
Brian

DURANGO
24th September 2014, 07:31
The super P,s I take it where the ones built in the 60,s ,I was in Perseus and Pyrrhus as we all know there was also Peleus the Christmas ship and also Patroculos what where they know as and however pretty the knew P,s where I think the old ones took some beating for style and elegance regards to all hands Dave .

makko
24th September 2014, 13:54
Dave,
The Old Fellah's ship was Dolius. He took her out new. From what he has mentioned, he sailed on Demodocus and Menestheus too (the mid/late 50's ones). I used to pore over the H&W opposed piston engine drawings as a kid and wonder at the Roots blower! I suppose marine engineering was in my blood. My Grandad was on the previous Patroclus when she was sunk by a U-Boat off Ireland.
Rgds.
Dave

Hugh Ferguson
24th September 2014, 16:48
Hugh Re the photo you took of the two deck crew on the Stentor,the man on the right is Doug Jardine, he was my wifes ex father in law Doug worked in the riggingloft at Odessey works.Do any other ex Blueys remember him .Dougs son, another Doug went down below as he was colour blind, he did a few trips on the Bowater boats,sadly he passed away earlier this year

.

I don't think I ever knew their names: we never used names in those days it was always rank. The guy on the left was "Lamps", a scoucer, and on the right was always addressed as "Bose", a Glaswegian, who frequently dropped in on us maddies, after work, usually to spin us a lurid yarn about a trip to Japan!
But this voyage was to Australia which was a long old haul for that worn out old coal-burner in which I made 4 voyages; middy and later 3rd mate.

(Click on image to enlarge. Sorry to confuse by mixing voyages in two different ships)

tom roberts
24th September 2014, 18:42
Thanks Hugh for the info.As I have posted before I was not considered Blue Funnel material as I left Aberdovey with the report that my second best efforts let me down I have posted before why.I take this opportunity to ask any Blue Funnel men do they remember my cousin Derek Roberts who lost his life in an accident aboard a Blue funnel ship in Glasgow in the late 60s.Derek was from Ruthin and is buried at Llanrhydd church Ruthin.

Mickdunn
25th September 2014, 06:55
Dunny,
That Denis O'Brien knew a thing or two about lifeboats.
He was six days in an open boat after the Anchises was bombed and sunk in the Atlantic.
Here is an excerpt from the citation when he was awarded the British Empire Medal for his bravery.


For his conduct in taking charge of an open boat for six days:
O'Brien, Denis John - Able Seaman, BEM (CIV)
Citation for Denis John O'Brien:
"The ship was hit by bombs and had to be abandoned. Boats were lowered and ordered to lie to their sea anchors.

'One of the boats became separated from the rest, and was at sea for six days in heavy weather. On the second day the officer in charge died and Able Seaman O'Brien found himself senior survivor. He sailed and organised the boat until rescued, showing courage, seamanship and resource throughout.'

Ungazetted award by Lloyd's
O'Brien, Denis John - Able Seaman Lloyd's Bravery Medal.

Regards,
Pat(Thumb)
Thanks for that info on D O'Brien Pat.I had only known him for that six weeks and not once did he talk about his war tales,probably didn't think he had too.
That's the kind of man he was I suppose a tough seaman and full of courage.
Cheers DUNNY.

Pat Kennedy
25th September 2014, 09:48
Thanks for that info on D O'Brien Pat.I had only known him for that six weeks and not once did he talk about his war tales,probably didn't think he had too.
That's the kind of man he was I suppose a tough seaman and full of courage.
Cheers DUNNY.

No, he never spoke about them to us either. It was only when I got away to sea that I learned of his history.
No doubt you recall his demonstration of wire splicing? It was like a conjuring trick. Once he had the first tuck inserted, in went the spike, and then a quick whirl of movement, and he'd run it in to five or six tucks. He could put an eye splice in a gal wire in about three minutes flat from start to finish.
Pat(Thumb)

jmcg
25th September 2014, 10:22
The super P,s I take it where the ones built in the 60,s ,I was in Perseus and Pyrrhus as we all know there was also Peleus the Christmas ship and also Patroculos what where they know as and however pretty the knew P,s where I think the old ones took some beating for style and elegance regards to all hands Dave .

No Durango - the Super Ps were named Priam, Peisander, Prometheus and Protesilaus - the last mentioned distinguished by being the worst Bluie I sailed on.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

makko
25th September 2014, 14:35
No Durango - the Super Ps were named Priam, Peisander, Prometheus and Protesilaus - the last mentioned distinguished by being the worst Bluie I sailed on.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

The full class was:
Blueys -
Priam
Peisander
Protesilaus
Prometheus

All having been built in British yards.

The Glens were-
Glenfinlas/Phemius
Radnorshire/Perseus
Pembrokeshire/Phrontis
Glenalmond/Patroclus
Both built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Nagasaki.

Glenalmond was the first ready to go into service but Holts had to pay MHI to delay the launch in order to get Priam into the bath first. The british vessels were all delivered late.

Rgds.
Dave

DURANGO
25th September 2014, 14:52
The full class was:
Blueys -
Priam
Peisander
Protesilaus
Prometheus
Phemius
Perseus
All having been built in British yards.

The Glens were-
Pembrokeshire/Phrontis
Glenalmond/Patroclus
Both built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Nagasaki.

Glenalmond was the first ready to go into service but Holts had to pay MHI to delay the launch in order to get Priam into the bath first. The british vessels were all delivered late.

Rgds.
Dave Are you saying Dave that there was a Perseus built after the one that I sailed in on the express service to Japan back in 1962 best regards Dave

makko
25th September 2014, 16:31
Are you saying Dave that there was a Perseus built after the one that I sailed in on the express service to Japan back in 1962 best regards Dave

Yes, Dave. Brief history of each below (Ack. Red Duster):

PERSEUS (3) was built in 1950 by Vickers Armstrong Ltd at Newcastle with a tonnage of 10109grt, a length of 515ft 6in a beam of 68ft 4in and a service speed of 18.5 knots. Sister of the Peleus she was launched on 22nd October 1949 and delivered to the China Mutual Steam Navigation Co. on 4th April 1950. Commencing her maiden voyage on 21st April 1950 she had an uneventful career with the company until 5th January 1973 when she arrived at Kaohsiung where she was broken up.


PERSEUS (4) was built in 1967 by Vickers Armstrong Ltd at Newcastle with a tonnage of 12094grt, a length of 563ft 10in, a beam of 77ft 11in and a service speed of 21 knots. Sister of the Priam she was completed for Glen Line as the Radnorshire. In 1973 she was transferred to the China Navigation Co. and renamed Perseus. After only eleven years with the Holt Group she was sold to John Swire's China Navigation Co., a company in which Holt's had a substantial interest, and renamed Kwangsi. Three years later, in 1981, she was sold to undisclosed owners and renamed Asia Dragon with registry in Panama. Shortly afterwards she was sold on to the Saudi Venture Corporation of Jeddah, later to be restyled Saudi Falcon Navigation Co., and renamed Saudi ZamZam. Two years later, in 1984, she was sold to Chinese shipbreakers.

There was even another Perseus, albeit Barber Perseus:

BARBER PERSEUS was built in 1984 by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries at Nagasaki, Japan with a tonnage of 21747grt, a length of 749ft 7in, a beam of 105ft 10in and a service speed of 20.5 knots. Sister of the Barber Priam she was launched on 7th February 1979 and delivered in the following June to Speakshaw Ltd with Ocean Fleets as managers. She was later transferred to Barber Menelaus Shipping Corp. of Panama, Blue Funnel having become a flag of convenience operation. In 1985 ownership was recorded as being Perseus Shipping Ltd of Panama. In 1987 she briefly returned to the British registry albeit at Douglas in the Isle of Man. Blue Funnel pulled out of the Barber Blue Sea consortium in 1988 and, as a result, sold the Barber Perseus to one of the other partners, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Lines AB of Stockholm, with whom she traded as the Talabot. The vessel was delivered to Changjiang Shipbreaking Yard at Jiangyin, China on 23 April 2009.

Regards,
Dave

jmcg
25th September 2014, 17:13
Perseus, Pyrrhus, Peleus & Patroclus were 4 of a kind (class) as were Neleus and Theseus.

Save for Pyrrhus sailed on all of them either coasting or voyage.

Favourite of all was the "A" class Autolycus, followed by the "H" class Hector. 7 voyages on Autolycus

Oh for just more trip as it used to be - what would we all give up to do it all just one more time.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

jmcg
25th September 2014, 17:32
Check here http://globalmariner.com for some interesting shots of former Bluies. If link doesn't work just google "globalmariner.com" without the the quote marks.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

Pat Kennedy
25th September 2014, 19:02
Perseus, Pyrrhus, Peleus & Patroclus were 4 of a kind (class) as were Neleus and Theseus.

Save for Pyrrhus sailed on all of them either coasting or voyage.

Favourite of all was the "A" class Autolycus, followed by the "H" class Hector. 7 voyages on Autolycus

Oh for just more trip as it used to be - what would we all give up to do it all just one more time.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

John,
Neleus and Theseus had a third sister, the Nestor.

I had good times on Autolycus as well. Although only coasting in her, with a crowd of heroes from Scotland Rd, we smuggled eight young ladies from Du Barry's Bar in Belfast on board, and had a high old time with them over to Glasgow, where they disembarked, heads held high, 24 hours after we tied up in KGV.
Best Regards,
Pat[=P]

jmcg
26th September 2014, 12:15
John,
Neleus and Theseus had a third sister, the Nestor.

I had good times on Autolycus as well. Although only coasting in her, with a crowd of heroes from Scotland Rd, we smuggled eight young ladies from Du Barry's Bar in Belfast on board, and had a high old time with them over to Glasgow, where they disembarked, heads held high, 24 hours after we tied up in KGV.
Best Regards,
Pat[=P]

Pat

Those red headed Colleens sure did know how to travel in style and with eclectic deck crews.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

Pat Kennedy
26th September 2014, 18:03
Pat

Those red headed Colleens sure did know how to travel in style and with eclectic deck crews.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

Funny enough John, one of them was a red head, her name was Marty, and she was a photo copy of Shirley MacLaine.
She certainly made a big impression on me.
[=P]

DURANGO
28th September 2014, 08:58
Thanks for that Dave another of our once great shipping company,s gone ,at least I have the memories and of course the chance to keep the memories alive on here with like minded good old boys, I reckon I have got a couple of watches on the wheel left in me given half a chance having said that if there was half a chance I reckon I would get flattened in the rush to get up the gangway best regards to all hands Dave

Mickdunn
28th September 2014, 10:17
No, he never spoke about them to us either. It was only when I got away to sea that I learned of his history.
No doubt you recall his demonstration of wire splicing? It was like a conjuring trick. Once he had the first tuck inserted, in went the spike, and then a quick whirl of movement, and he'd run it in to five or six tucks. He could put an eye splice in a gal wire in about three minutes flat from start to finish.
Pat(Thumb)

Yes I do remember the way he could run a splice Pat I tried a few times but could never do it that way.Always ended up doing one tuck at a time.
DUNNY.(Cloud)

tom roberts
28th September 2014, 13:12
No, he never spoke about them to us either. It was only when I got away to sea that I learned of his history.
No doubt you recall his demonstration of wire splicing? It was like a conjuring trick. Once he had the first tuck inserted, in went the spike, and then a quick whirl of movement, and he'd run it in to five or six tucks. He could put an eye splice in a gal wire in about three minutes flat from start to finish.
Pat(Thumb)

On Slicing wire Pat the best I have ever seen was a rigger in Land and Marines loft his name was Terry Ezra I don't think he had ever been to sea,a guy was doing demonstrations some years ago at the Liverpool Maritime Museum and he told me it was Terry who taught him ,he was doing work for the rigging on the Warrior in Portsmouth.

Aberdonian
28th September 2014, 16:40
I tread warily here since I am looking back near six decades, but when I worked for just a few months with a rigging firm i did my share of splicing mainly wire trawl warps. We had the facilities there to hold the wire and thimble in a vice with special jaw attachments then the standing part of the wire would be hauled vertical by means of an overhead block and made fast. After the first tucks I am almost certain the strands were run up one after the other. A finishing touch was to lay the splice on an anvil and gently beat out any irregularities; all nice and tiddly.

Keith

Pat Kennedy
28th September 2014, 19:02
I tread warily here since I am looking back near six decades, but when I worked for just a few months with a rigging firm i did my share of splicing mainly wire trawl warps. We had the facilities there to hold the wire and thimble in a vice with special jaw attachments then the standing part of the wire would be hauled vertical by means of an overhead block and made fast. After the first tucks I am almost certain the strands were run up one after the other. A finishing touch was to lay the splice on an anvil and gently beat out any irregularities; all nice and tiddly.

Keith

More or less Keith, except I always hauled the standing part horizontally not vertically. As for special jaw attachments, saw them used in Cammell Lairds rigging loft, but they mainly were using hydraulic swaging instead of splicing at that time.

Pat(Thumb)

IAN M
11th October 2014, 01:40
After four deepsea voyages, followed by a coasting voyage, on the Glengarry, I requested a voyage to Australia before I left the sea. Calverley, who appointed R/Os, was non-commital and sent me coasting on several ships for a period of about seven months, then asked, "How would you like the Deucalion. She's going to Australia?" Then added that the Ixion, fitting out in Belfast, would be ready next month and that Reg Peaston, who was to sail as her 1st RO/Purser, was ill and that, if he hadn't recovered, I could have her.

Reg recovered in time and I sailed from Liverpool on the Deucalion (Captain 'Film Star' Kerr) during the evening of Monday, 8 January, 1951. We broke down in the Mersey, it took 43 days to reach Melbourne, and we ended up going round Indonesian islands loading copra. (The story of the voyage is told in my Kindle book, Last Voyage and Beyond.)

The Deucalion had been the Glenogle, built in Glasgow by Harland & Wolff in 1920, and was part of the Glen Line Fleet acquired by Holts in 1935. Glenogle, Glenapp, Glengarry, Glenbeg, and five other vessels of the same design, had been the largest oil burning ships in the world and all were twin-screw motor vessels. The Glenogle, which was renamed Deucalion in 1949, had a gross tonnage of 9513 and accommodation for twelve passengers.

The other Glen Line ships listed above had been renamed as follows: Glenapp - Dardanus (GDXT) : Glengarry, which had been renamed Glenstrae in 1939 to release her name for the ship building in Copenhagen - Dolius (GCXD) : Glenbeg - Dymas (GBZK).

Hugh Ferguson
11th October 2014, 10:56
Glengarry alongside Holt's Wharf.

Mickdunn
21st October 2014, 10:34
Perseus, Pyrrhus, Peleus & Patroclus were 4 of a kind (class) as were Neleus and Theseus.

Save for Pyrrhus sailed on all of them either coasting or voyage.

Favourite of all was the "A" class Autolycus, followed by the "H" class Hector. 7 voyages on Autolycus

Oh for just more trip as it used to be - what would we all give up to do it all just one more time.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)
You are so right about one more trip BW. I was working nights on a bluey I think it was the Ixion that was finishing loading for Aussie that night,I had sailed on her before I left the sea.
All night driving that crane I was talking my self into stowing away on her.but come morning when the shore gang started closing the hatches I couldn't do it(Cloud)

Farmer John
21st October 2014, 17:44
If we all clubbed together could we get one built? ;>]

Mickdunn
4th November 2014, 07:07
If we all clubbed together could we get one built? ;>]

Wouldn't that be great FJ?i would throw all my worldly goods in. Cheers DUNNY.(K)

Geoff Dear
15th April 2016, 12:05
Hi my name is Geoff Deer

My first Blue was the Automedon 1961

Happy Days Henry's Bar Hong Kong

Leratty
15th April 2016, 12:41
I have always loved that term 'go down,' does anyone know how or where it originated?

India used the term too & still does.

As to Blue Flue, yes their ships always looked powerful & business like similarly well cared for though I never hankered to join one, nor a Ben boat either. Not sure why. Guess I just liked my delightful trampers often looking unkempt by 'line' ship stds but always enjoyable, as well you were never sure where you would wind up. Crews also had that feeling of being born under the wandering star as Lee Marvin sang. Yes sir would love to do it again.

red lead
15th April 2016, 19:34
[quote=DURANGO;1062417]I to had very few problems at sea and I sailed with lads from all corners of the UK and in many ships I was the only Londoner on deck in fact when I was with Blue Funnel from what I remember when I was in the Pyrrhus apart from me and a pal who joined her with me there was the bosun known as the Gaul I think he may have been also from London ,

I believe the bosun you mention was 'The Ghoul' whose real name, if I ever knew it, I have forgotten. He always wore black leather gloves, and would prowl the decks during the night. A strange man, he once had a small part in a film which featured a Blue Funnel ship, I think it was the Bellerophon, whose name was shortened to 'Belle' for the filming. The Ghoul played the gangwayman in one short sequence. The film was called, 'The Sailor who fell from Grace with the Sea, and starred Kris Kristofferson and Sarah Miles.
Best Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

Pat Kennedy
15th April 2016, 21:42
[QUOTE=red lead;1965321]

You are right Red Lead, it was indeed Bert Evans.
Someone once told me that The Ghoul, as he was known to all, was a charabanc driver while he was home on leave. did you ever hear this?(Thumb)

price
16th April 2016, 08:41
My first Blue Funnel Ship was the Agapenor, around the land. The Bosun was Ralph Ball. Bruce

A.D.FROST
16th April 2016, 09:58
sorry wrong forum I though it was about porn(Jester)

Hugh Ferguson
16th April 2016, 11:26
He was an A.B., Pat, when I knew him and I can remember him well having gone several voyages, one as a middy and then as a 3rd mate in the old coal-burning Elpenor previously Glenfinlas c.1946 and again in 1949 (yes, a white crowd in a Glen boat!).
Jimmy Newall was another name I remember.
I've got some copies of old Articles stashed away some-place, I'll see if I can come up with some more names which maybe familiar to you.

Seventry years ago-in this same month of April-I arrived in Hong Kong for the first of many times.
The first people to come aboard were the three sisters Tam King, Tam Choi and the youngest, Tam Chen.
Here's a photo, taken on Truro Station some 40 odd years later, of Tam Chen and her daughter, Cheng Wing Ling (Rita), arriving for a visit! (She is now living in San Jose , U.S.A.)

IAN M
17th July 2017, 00:18
MY FIRST BLUEY was the Liberty Ship 'Samite', and the preamble up to joining her was as follows.

30 June 1943. Collected PMG Special Certificate at Dundee Wireless College.
1 July. Received telegram from Alfred Holt & Co. to attend for interview at 54 Ullet Road, Liverpool, at 9am the next day.
2 and 3 July. Interviewed, medically examined, and accepted into the Company.
5 July. Joined the Merchant Navy at the Mercantile Marine Office in Dundee.
7 July. Boarded HMTS Queen Elizabeth in Greenock.
14 July. Arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

After sojourns in hotels in Halifax and Baltimore, we sailed in Convoy UGS.18, bound for the Mediterranean, and trouble.

MY FIRST POST-WAR BLUEY was the Liberty Ship 'Samnesse', the story of which is contained in my book, OUTWARD BOUND. I never had a happier time at sea, and the book is now available on Amazon in both Kindle and print formats.

stehogg
17th July 2017, 10:40
Like you Geoff my first Bluey was the Automedon in October 1964,joining as a still wet behind the ears engineer cadet,what an adventure,apart from a school trip to Interlaken in Switzerland in 1958 I hadnt been far from home before.Three and a half months later my first voyage completed couldnt wait to get home to share my experiences with family and friends.Always maintained that being able to travel the world for nearly 30 years was the best part of my education(A)

TonyAllen
17th July 2017, 17:07
elpenor my first 1955 chef bill johnson 2nd cook joe hughes 2n steward vince .
other lad ronnnie baker brian yates Arthur graham captain A K HOLE...
.ABs mcvicar norman wong ,brian blease "also sailed with his brother joe on the catalina star"first trip far east .the old world ..after a battered ore carrier that was my first ship .they where a dream 9 trips in all ..memories

Pat Kennedy
17th July 2017, 20:06
My first was the Achilles. I joined her in Birkenhead as first trip deck boy on December 24 1958.
I was seasick, homesick, and shocked to the core by the realities of life at sea as a 'Peggy'
I swore I would spend the rest of my life working on a farm if only I could escape.
There was no escape, but strangely enough, I went back for more.
(Sad)

Barrie Youde
17th July 2017, 20:53
We all now know that Blue Flue was something which would not last. Realisation came to some sooner than others; and some still pine for its passing, almost thirty years since the last ship of the fleet paid off.

I'm simply grateful that I knew it. It taught me much. It taught me, not least, that nothing tangible lasts forever. It also taught that certain principles have a value which does last forever; and the extent to ehich any one of us might value those principles is a personal matter entirely. I was in the company only for the first 12 months of my working life; and I haven't the slightest doubt that other readers in other companies learned farmore than i did in that time (Sept 1959 - October 1960).

First ship - Jason - Farmer Gould of Tyn-y-Gongl, Master.

TonyAllen
17th July 2017, 22:43
I went from a snotty nose kids the education I never knew from a catholic school.from 90% of all the shipmates.that if you did your job without moaning you got respect .first time ashore in singapore was taken down to bugis street for an outdoor meal and looked after by the wise old heads .from swapping books with the guys on almost every thing you could think off ,"some naughty ones as well".they were the foundation for the rest of my life. fellas from wales. scots. the isles.cocknies.geordies.scousers .the old UK that we lived in.alass I was loured away by a lady when i should have known better ."never worked out the long run anyway"hut eat path I have taken since has been of my own choosing .hat of to all you blues out there Tony