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TIRPITZ
TIRPITZ

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DHendrickson



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Registered: December 2013
Location: Chesapeake VA USA
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Another in a series of ill-fated World War Two naval vessels, this time the German Battleship Tirpitz off the coast of Norway in 1942.
· Date: Fri, 19 July 19 · Views: 261
· Filesize: 16.9kb, 101.8kb · Dimensions: 1024 x 689 ·
Additional Info
Keywords: TIRPITZ
Source of Image, If not your own: 9x12 pencil drawing by David Hendrickson
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Stephen J. Card

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Registered: November 2006
Posts: 9,070
Fri, 19 July 19 21:15

Ah! Good subject. Excellent drawing as always.

Stephen
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vegaskip
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Registered: November 2010
Location: Auchtermuchty
Posts: 3,260
Sat, 20 July 19 05:07

I second Stephen.
Jim
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donmac
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Registered: July 2005
Posts: 1,960
Sat, 20 July 19 09:24

A good subject indeed David.

Don
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vegaskip
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Registered: November 2010
Location: Auchtermuchty
Posts: 3,260
Sat, 20 July 19 12:49

If they had built her without engines (and kept it quiet) she couldn’t have been more useful. As a 'Force in Being' Hitler got his money's worth.!
Jim
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blausioux

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Registered: August 2015
Location: Zürich / Switzerland
Posts: 540
Sat, 20 July 19 14:30

David,
I like the two mountains....
the TIRPITZ is a mountain and the the norwegian mountain in the background.
A nice duality in your drawing.
Emil

ps: The wreck was scrapped in the 1950s by a local Norwegian salvage company.

------------------------------
Emil Gut
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Spanish Binnacle

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Registered: February 2013
Location: North Spain
Posts: 1,464
Sun, 21 July 19 06:16

Nice one David. I agree with Emil about mountains.

David

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DHendrickson
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Registered: December 2013
Location: Chesapeake VA USA
Posts: 923
Sun, 21 July 19 15:02

Tirpitz was I suppose in the end a magnificent failure. Emil: an astute observation. The mountains deliberately mimic the shape of the ship and the shadows and highlights in the mountains pick up the patterns and colors in the ship's lines and dazzle paint scheme. It's instinctive. I rarely consciously think about it when working but many years ago one of my teachers used to constantly say "Always relate your horizontals to your verticals" and I have never forgotten that mantra (RIP Mr Baxter).
David
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stein
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Registered: November 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 14,684
Mon, 22 July 19 22:21

I would say she was "stuck" due to that repeated outline, but that may have been the intention, as she surely was stuck inside that fjord - a perfect sitting duck when first found. (We turned her into nails after the war, so she kept sticking... yeah lousy pun, but I felt obliged). What I remember of teaching related to the picture is: never use parallels at different distances as that destroys space (they stick to each other), and try to find or produce overlaps to indicate distance. "Study Chardin" I was told in this respect, "and keep studying Chardin". Who as far as subjects goes, must be about the dullest painter of all - but space he could produce) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-B...hardin_029.jpg

And, oh yes: "Never keep a whole outline intact, always let it bleed somewhere." Why this was necessary to indicate space, mr. Møller could mot tell me, but he convincingly showed me by altering my lead pencil drawn pear so as to fuse the shadows on the pear and what it cast on the table. "And always use the contrast available, use all the darkness you can get from the medium." This was often insisted on.

And if you want a moving object to look as if moving, give it space to move, and if possible indicate its destination.

A famous example of this adhered to: https://www.phillips.com/detail/HENR...ON/UK040210/59
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blausioux

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Registered: August 2015
Location: Zürich / Switzerland
Posts: 540
Tue, 23 July 19 08:42

David and stein,

Good remarks about the composition and the craft of paintings. Also the quote; "Never keep a whole outline, but always let it bleed somewhere."

I often have struggle... that i do not „set the color“ enough. It is sometimes „too much elapsed“.

Emil

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Emil Gut
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stein
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Registered: November 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 14,684
Tue, 23 July 19 10:19

I know the word "elapse" only as used about time being passed, in general about limited time already being spent. So I ask myself: what is the original language here -is it perhaps French? In French you have the word "s'ecouler", which when retranslated into English becomes (in addition to time being passed) "to flow out, to pour out, as in "the crowd pours out of the stadium and disperses rapidly". Which I will say is exactly what I meant with my "bleeding." And if I now understand you, then I will say that it is easier to merge two sides of a border through the use of darkness, or detail erasing light, than to force a common colour upon them. But it still remains difficult at times. I have as yet not found an answer to how one can merge a square sail anywhere in its outline with another sail behind it, as long as there is enough light to cast shadows. Which probably is one reason why Charles Robert Patterson, for example, for the most part kept his sails in the shade.

No, reading your posting again, I suspect youare saying that your problem is the opposite, a need to further disentangle parts from another. Well, I will let my musings stay, too much or too little - same difference.
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blausioux

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Registered: August 2015
Location: Zürich / Switzerland
Posts: 540
Tue, 23 July 19 11:02

Ahhh stein, i'm a simple in my english wording. Sorry. I take "google translate" for conversation.
I can not really a foreign language.

Yes i mean "s'ecouler"!
However, you're right ....it remains a problem.

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Emil Gut
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DHendrickson
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Registered: December 2013
Location: Chesapeake VA USA
Posts: 923
Tue, 23 July 19 20:12

Another of Mr Baxter's mantras, similar to what is noted by Stein above was to look at and learn from the Masters and from other artists' work and to borrow freely from them (while of course, interpreting your subject matter in your own way). Another was "You can't break rules until you know and understand them." A third was to always balance lights and darks which goes hand in hand with relating horizontals and verticals as do all the rest. It all seemed abstract at the time (to use my own bad pun), but one day he picked up a picture of a painting (might have been by Vincent van Gogh) and started drawing lines on it. When he finished there were lines dividing up the paper into sections but it illustrated what he meant by the relationship of horizontal and vertical patterns and the relationship of light and dark colors. After that I began to understand what he was saying.
In so far as the drawing is concerned, the idea was to have the ship blend in with the background in as much as it was essentially doing just that at that point.
David
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