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eriskay



Senior Member

Registered: March 2006
Location: Scotland
Posts: 1,043
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Parsons Marine Turbine Company Limited, Wallsend

A view on the HP and LP double-reduction geared turbine unit for a 1960s oil tanker. (I worked on a few of these throughout my 5-year apprenticeship but don't recall seeing any as clean and neat as this!)
· Date: Fri, 16 April 10 · Views: 683
· Tags: 2 · Filesize: 166.9kb, 167.0kb · Dimensions: 1024 x 754 ·
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Joe Freeman
Senior Member

Registered: January 2007
Posts: 378
Wed, 21 April 10 17:33

Great series of photographs depicting the steam turbine and gear case coupled together and open for inspection. During may apprenticeship I think that I only saw two or three turbine units but never assembled on the shop floor as shown and never tested with steam. I remember the gear cutting machine was contained in a temperature controlled room which I was never able to see inside, but I do remember deburring the edges of the teeth to a specific profile each tooth to be checked by the fitter.
Good pictures keep them coming.
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gordy
Senior Member

Registered: April 2008
Location: Helensburgh
Posts: 1,656
Thu, 22 April 10 05:04

Really enjoy these pictures.
In Fairfields, Govan, apprentice fitters and turners started off in the training school which also contained the turbine blade machine shop. It was fascinating to a brand new apprentice to see how complex this operation. (No tape controlled machines then, 1961).
I was told Fairfields and John Browns had the only gear cutting machines in Scotland that could do that size. Maybe Admiralty subsidised?
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japottinger

Senior Member

Registered: June 2004
Location: Bridge of Don, Aberdeen
Posts: 8,351
Fri, 23 April 10 15:49

Wonderful shots of classic propulsion units, contrast with the grease driven monsters.
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japottinger

Senior Member

Registered: June 2004
Location: Bridge of Don, Aberdeen
Posts: 8,351
Fri, 23 April 10 15:56

Some of the Brocklebank ships did not have a gland steam condenser, and the gland steam was directed out through a copper pipe above the glands. In hot weather it was difficult to see the vapour from tne outlet and we used to pass a thin bit of wood abopve the outlet to check the flow, one junior was bold enough to pass his hand above the outlet, with the expected results!
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japottinger

Senior Member

Registered: June 2004
Location: Bridge of Don, Aberdeen
Posts: 8,351
Fri, 23 April 10 16:00

On the Manipur the LP casing was from cast iron or steel. After lying at Southend in Thames waiting on the pilot when we got under way we lost all vacuum, after a lot of searching we found that there was a crack in the top casing from edge of the square bolted plate at the inspection opening. Remedy was a filling the crack with Thistlebond resin filler, after test at holding vacuum at full astern we took a chance and proceeded up river to dock. Happy days.
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chadburn
Senior Member

Registered: June 2008
Location: North Yorkshire
Posts: 10,573
Fri, 23 April 10 16:47

Thank God for "Thistlebond", I did a trip the Queen City she was full of it and known as the Thistlebond Queen in Reardon Smith's

------------------------------
Geordie Chief

From Grey Funnel to any Funnel, just show him/ me the money Mabel
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cmakin
Senior Member

Registered: April 2007
Location: Manvel, Texas
Posts: 551
Wed, 23 June 10 07:35

Thistlebond must be kin to Red Hand. It was said that Lykes Lines couldn't operate without the stuff. But we all knew that Waterman probably had ships made of it.
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Wallace Slough
Senior Member

Registered: March 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 1,810
Wed, 23 June 10 12:11

Columbia Steamship had a host of C2's that had been purchased from Alcoa after a lifetime of hauling bauxite. Without Red Hand, I'm sure the ships couldn't have stayed afloat! Thanks for the pictures and memories Cmakin.
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makko

Senior Member

Registered: July 2006
Location: Mexico City
Posts: 5,718
Thu, 24 June 10 07:49

The Parsons Turbine Company was bought lock, stock and barrel by Westinghouse and production moved to USA along with a lot of the workers! It is now part of Siemens Power Engineering. I was up in Charlotte, North Carolina a couple of years back and got the story off the young project manager who had followed his dad, originally from the NE, into the business. The original plant was in New Hampshire. Unfortunately, I usually get to see both Sts and gas turbines when they have been wrecked! The one I chased to Charlotte was the LP/IP rotor and casings from a 340MW unit and was under commissioning after an upgrade when it suffered contamination in the steam. The steam generator had undergone an upgrade too with the addition of extra superheaters and it was believed that the contam was a result of inadequate purging following the work and subsequent chemical bath.
The C/E for Siemens was a fascinating gentleman, originally from Somalia who had studied MarEng in Holland and subsequently was in great demand sailing from the US.
I cannot forget this case as I was stuck in Charlotte waiting for the parts to arrive and missed my daughter's birthday and nearly didn't make it home for Christmas! (arrived 22/12!)
Regards,
Dave
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