05:09

Welcome
Welcome!Welcome to Ships Nostalgia, the world's greatest online community for people worldwide with an interest in ships and shipping. Whether you are crew, ex-crew, ship enthusiasts or cruisers, this is the forum for you. And what's more, it's completely FREE.

Click here to go to the forums home page and find out more.
Click here to join.
Log in
User Name Password

  Home · Search · Register  

Home » Royal Navy Ships Photo Options

« Previous image · Next image »

S_309_Patrol_Boat
S 309 Fast Patrol Boat = Grey Goose

« Previous image  · Slide Show · Next image »


Photo Details
eriskay



Senior Member

Registered: March 2006
Location: Scotland
Posts: 1,043
View Gallery Profile Send PM users gallery
Anyone able to identify - have not got details of this vessel.



G and J Weir of Glasgow were Manufacturers of some of the on-board auxiliary plant and systems. The photo was rescued from old Company archives that were being disposed of some 20 years ago. (Identity of the original photographer unknown)
· Date: Thu, 13 May 10 · Views: 331
· Filesize: 72.5kb · Dimensions: 800 x 544 ·
Additional Info
Keywords: S 309 Fast Patrol Boat = Grey Goose
« more
Newcastle_19820711_.jpg
Shetland_19820711_.jpg
Onyx.jpg
HMS_Blade_ex-Z5_.jpg
1623.jpg
1330.jpg
2167.jpg
Wizard1.jpg
HMS_Richmond_2.JPG
HMS_Richmond_1.JPG
S_309_Patrol_Boat.jpg
ArkRoyal_20100422_-09.JPG
ArkRoyal_20100422_-04.JPG
Keen367.jpg
Attacker_class.jpg
Tiger1.jpg
Albion_20100422_-08.JPG
Albion_20100422_-11.JPG
Albion_20100422_-02.JPG
SN_8-5-10_unknown_frigate.jpg
Kopi_af_IMG_4216.JPG
· more »

Author
Thread  
RUMRAT
Senior Member

Registered: April 2004
Posts: 259
Thu, 13 May 10 15:11

GREY GOOSE Mate.
Regards
Dave
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
AncientBrit

Senior Member

Registered: October 2007
Location: Near Vancouver,Canada
Posts: 1,589
Thu, 13 May 10 16:04

Grey Goose she is, the funnel had me puzzled, the Grey Goose I was familiar with had two, side by side, flatter oval form.
One of her earliest C.O's was Lt Cdr Peter Scott, noted ornithologist and son of Scott of the Antarctic. I believe she was also the worlds first gas turbine powered vessel.

------------------------------
Bob
Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
eriskay

Senior Member

Registered: March 2006
Location: Scotland
Posts: 1,043
Thu, 13 May 10 16:47

Thanks, Dave and Bob. Yes, the funnel / funnels question confuses, depending on what old images you study. 1942-build, originally as a steam powered fast gun boat, and when new her Commander was indeed the famous and distinguished Sir Peter Scott. In 1942 she was for a time based at Oban on the West Coast of Scotland. After the war, she was laid up; for a spell, then around October 1955, as far as I can establish, she was selected for experimentation with gas turbine propulsion using Rolls-Royce RM 60 3-stage gas turbines and the experiemnt was deemed highly successful. It is understood she was the first gas turbine powered vessel in the world. She was sold off in the late 1950s into private hands and duly converted, superbly it has to be said, into a private cruiser and renamed Anserava.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
donald h
Senior Member

Registered: August 2005
Location: Isle of Harris
Posts: 1,814
Fri, 14 May 10 16:20

I`m presuming that the weapon aft of the oerlikon gunner at the bow had some sort of cam system firing cut out so the oerlikon gunner didn`t get shot by friendly fire?
Donald
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
AncientBrit

Senior Member

Registered: October 2007
Location: Near Vancouver,Canada
Posts: 1,589
Fri, 14 May 10 17:51

If you look real close, you can see the metal frame restricting the aiming of the gun to a limit of about 145 degrees port and starboard from dead ahead. Much more efficient than any cam system, cheaper also!

------------------------------
Bob
Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
donald h
Senior Member

Registered: August 2005
Location: Isle of Harris
Posts: 1,814
Sat, 15 May 10 09:02

Thanks Bob,..the eyes are beginning to get a bit iffy in "real close" mode nowadays, so thanks for the explanation.
Donald
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
donald h
Senior Member

Registered: August 2005
Location: Isle of Harris
Posts: 1,814
Sun, 16 May 10 08:16

Hi Bob, once again,
Two days later I`ve just seen what you were talking about. Looking in the wrong place!!
I can see that this is obviously so that the oerlikon gunner couldn`t fire inboard at the ship or crew while traversing aft, but I was actually talking about personnel manning the heavier gun platform to the rear of the oerlikon mounting being able to fire at or very close to the gunner manning the oerlikon gun to the front of them.
regards, Donald
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
AncientBrit

Senior Member

Registered: October 2007
Location: Near Vancouver,Canada
Posts: 1,589
Sun, 16 May 10 12:16

You know what they say about "assume" Haha!
I automatically (pun) assumed you had to be talking about the 20mm in the bow, because the main gun is a "single-banger" 3inch and wouldnt need the safety constrains of an automatic quick-firing type weapon.

------------------------------
Bob
Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
donald h
Senior Member

Registered: August 2005
Location: Isle of Harris
Posts: 1,814
Sun, 16 May 10 15:44

Thanks Bob,
However, I don`t think I`d fancy a 3inch shell flying past at close range just above my head. Could be of course, that they would possibly be using safety firing limits to negate the problem, as more common with large calibre weapons!!
Donald
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  
zardoz121
Member

Registered: January 2012
Location: Rayleigh Essex
Posts: 5
Wed, 25 January 12 13:12

Definitely Peter Scott's Grey Goose SGB9 (also S309 as in the pick but this was taken I think on work up before entering active service), my dad served on her from commissioning until march 1942 when he transferred to MTB622. He took part in a number of forays to the French and Dutch coasts in search of convoys and E Boats to bring to battle, from their base at Dover. She took part in the Dieppe raid in particular.

Originally 60 of the type were ordered as MTB and MGB types were not a real match for the more effective and heavily armed S Boats (E boats to us) but only 7 were delivered and two were on the stocks but after their first action (in the Seine estuary) SGB 7 was sunk and this showed a particular vulnerability to gunfire of the steam turbine engines and so their role was much more limited than they originally were designed for. As a result the order for 60 was cancelled and the two on the stocks were never completed.

The remaining 6 boats were named as Peter Scott argued that at 145 feet 8 inches they were above the minimum length for boats to receive names and so rather than the stark SGB numbering, Grey Goose, Grey Seal, Grey Wolf, Grey Fox and Grey Owl and Grey Shark were born. All six survived the war. SGB9 Grey Goose was converted to test Gas Turbines and fitted with twin funnels and later sold to be converted to the houseboat Ansevera which is now berthed on the River Medway in Kent.
This user is offline
Click here to see this users profile Click here to Send this user a Private Message Find more posts by this user Visit this user's gallery  

Photo Sharing Gallery by PhotoPost
Copyright © 2007 All Enthusiast, Inc.



Support SN


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.