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USS Saratoga (CV-3)
USS Saratoga (CV-3)

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stein



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Registered: November 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 14,698
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Launched, 7 Apr 1925. Commissioned, 16 Nov 1927. Sunk, 25 Jul 1946 as target for atomic bomb.

The first plane to take off has the shortest takeoff space, but probably the longest landing space. If the last one in is in too much of a hurry, he will push all the others into the sea? That's how it looks here at least, but I suppose they generally put some planes below? And if they did - why are seemingly every plane paraded on deck here?
· Date: Sun, 3 October 10 · Views: 279
· Filesize: 111.3kb, 111.3kb · Dimensions: 1024 x 657 ·
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Keywords: USS Saratoga
Source of Image, If not your own: Svenskt Skeppsbyggeri nd
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Rob Andrew

Rob Andrew

Registered: September 2006
Location: Aberdeenshire
Posts: 2,385
Sun, 3 October 10 09:30

The inscrutible ways of naval aviation, I'll bet it was colourful though.
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stein
Senior Member

Registered: November 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 14,698
Sun, 3 October 10 10:38

Maybe they are cleaning up, or painting below, and so has put every plane out of the way?
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Rob Andrew

Rob Andrew

Registered: September 2006
Location: Aberdeenshire
Posts: 2,385
Mon, 4 October 10 03:06

A publicity photo perhaps. I wonder why there's one man alone in the middle of the bare area, and what it is that looks so much like a kit bag.
Beautifully sinuous waterline there.
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Hawkeye
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Registered: December 2005
Posts: 1,168
Mon, 4 October 10 18:57

They look like early biplanes which didn't need as much deck to launch. One of the reasons why they were all on deck is they were preparing to fly to maybe an airfield. And ship going into refit.
But this looks like one of the exercises that the Americans did in the early years of carrierbourne aviation. Testing ideas, etc. The ship behind is the Lexington and it seems she also has all her aircraft on deck.
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stein
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Registered: November 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 14,698
Wed, 6 October 10 04:04

Still seems a short space: but I guess there was a catapult in use.
When I was in the army we cleared a landing/takeoff space for a Fieseler Storch, and this was not much bigger, if any. (Old plane, Hitler's Luftwaffe used it, but I believe it's ability to take off in a short space was not improved upon by a propeller plane.)
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Kinnie
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Registered: June 2010
Location: Cornwall
Posts: 511
Wed, 6 October 10 04:13

Steam catapults were a British invention post war. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_catapult
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stein
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Registered: November 2006
Location: Norway
Posts: 14,698
Wed, 6 October 10 04:28

Then steaming into the wind and holding back the plane for a while was the only help available here? The tail hook catching a braking cable was perhaps also a late invention.
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dmaco09
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Registered: July 2010
Location: Lompoc, California USA
Posts: 470
Mon, 18 October 10 05:08

Hydraulic 'cats' were in use on many, if not all US carriers during WWII- essential for the little 'Escort' vessels. They weren't necessary on the fleet carriers but could free up a lot of space on the flight deck as they made 'deck runs' unnecessary, and more planes could be spotted topside to get a strike launched quickly. They were inadequate to launch big, heavy jets- the British steam catapult made that possible.

Arrester gear has been around longer, I think only the earliest RN ships flying WWI-vintage 'planes got by without it.
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Klaatu83
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Registered: January 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 4,090
Sun, 24 October 10 13:46

These early carriers didn't have catapults, at least, not during the period when this photograph was taken. However, they were converted, while already under construction, from hulls that had originally been laid down as battle-cruisers, so that they were able to generate plenty of headwind; more than enough to launch the sort of early biplanes seen on deck in that short a distance. In that respect, these two carriers were of the same generation, and similar in size and concept, to Britain's HMS Furious, Courageous and Glorious, as the Japanese carriers Akagi and Kaga.

The Lexington (seen astern) was sunk at the Battle of the Coral Sea in 1942. The Saratoga survived being damaged several times, but was finally destroyed after the war at Bikini Atoll during the same atomic bomb tests that sank the German cruiser Prinz Eugen. Although the Saratoga was among the few ships that were actually still afloat after the blast, her huge funnel was blown down flat across her flight deck! I believe the Navy eventually had to scuttle her in order to to get her to finally go down.
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